Ypres 1914: The Menin Road, Battleground Early Battles 1914

This series of battlefield guides has been proving very successful and this new addition to the series follows the established format. The First World War is largely remembered as a bitter war of attrition between trench systems that ran from the Channel coast to the Swiss border but it did not start that way and the authors provide a graphic story of the Menin Road with a guide for those intending to visit the battlefield. – Most Highly Recommended

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NAME: Ypres 1914: The Menin Road, Battleground Early Battles 1914
FILE: R2775
AUTHOR: Nigel Cave & Jack Sheldon
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 216
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War One, World War 1, First World War, The 
Great War, BEF, Ypres, war of mobility, trench warfare, British Army, French Army, 
Belgian Army, Germany Army

ISBN: 1-78159-200-4

IMAGE: B2775.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yb2klmvm
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  This series of battlefield guides has been proving very 
successful and this new addition to the series follows the established format.  
The First World War is largely remembered as a bitter war of attrition between
 trench systems that ran from the Channel coast to the Swiss border but it did 
not start that way and the authors provide a graphic story of the Menin Road 
with a guide for those intending to visit the battlefield. -  Most Highly
Recommended

Battlefield tours in Europe and beyond have become increasingly popular. Where once they were 
undertaken by veterans, they are now undertaken by their grand children, and great grand children. 
Although guided tours are available and highly recommended, many visit as individuals and family
 groups. Even for those intending to take a guided tour, a guide book, such as this new volume, are 
most useful. However, the readership is much wider even than that. This book is an excellent 
example of a pocket-able volume that packs a great deal of information and images at a very 
affordable price. As a result, it is an excellent addition to the library of any military history enthusiast, 
professional, or newcomer to military history and battlefields.

The authors have combined their considerable experience of battlefield guides with careful research, 
and presented an extremely readable and concise volume that is small enough to carry in a coat pocket.

The epic rearguard fight of the BEF against what should have been overwhelming German numbers 
has dominated the story of the opening engagements of WWI as the Germans ruthlessly drove through
 neutral Belgium and attempted to break through the British and French troops between them and Paris 
in a repeat of the Franco Prussian War. The Germans were quick to deride the British Expeditionary 
Force as a Contemptible Little Army and believed that this was so. The BEF had other thoughts and 
fought a series of brilliant rearguards that numbers suggested they be destroyed. As a battle was fought, 
the British units fell back in good order and regrouped to fight all over again and shocked the Germans 
in the process. This was a war of movement that included infantry, cavalry and artillery.

The British proved to be well trained, equipped and led. However, they took heavy casualties and it was 
a mark of their determination that they kept fighting. The infantry were so well trained that the Germans 
often thought they faced machine guns when in reality they were facing Lee Enfield bolt-action rifles 
handled by well-drilled troops to produce a very rapid rate of aimed fire.

The result was that today we remember the BEF fight when we should also remember the Belgian Army 
that continued fighting and the French troops on the British right flank. The BEF elan and stamina may 
have deserved special recognition, but it was a joint British, Belgian, French defence.

The British and French staff had established commendable communication and understanding, especially 
so when neither army had any prior experience of fighting together apart from during the Crimean War 
half a Century and more before. That enabled them to move from fighting withdrawals to counter attack. 
By that stage the BEF was exhausted and did not manage to turn the retreat, they and their French 
comrades had forced on the Germans, into a rout. That gave the Germans just enough time to start 
digging in before they were thrown back over their border. That then became the start of a long trench 
war of attrition.

The authors have provided a great deal of information on the fighting and the senior commanders 
involved. Much of this will be new information even for some enthusiasts who started their studies at 
the trench war and missed the critical opening battles. Onto this information is laid the information to 
help those going today to visit the sites of the old battlefields.