Azzurra gunning for three in a row at Copa del Rey MAPFRE

July-3115-aae819e4-5f84-48ec-a95b-ce98232064bc

When the 52 SUPER SERIES fleet of 11 TP52s gather for next week’s Mediterranean summer showcase regatta, the 34th Copa del Rey MAPFRE, series leaders Azzurra will be bidding to win their third regatta in a row and the fleet will welcome new American owners to compete on the world’s leading grand prix multihull circuit for the first time.

bbn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

Azzurra, the emblematic yacht of the Roemmers family which races in the colours of the Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, are on a charge. Winners of the Settimana Delle Boche from Puerto Cervo, Sardinia and the 52 World Championships earlier in July from Puerto Portals Mallorca, the crew which is skippered by Guillermo Parada are riding a wave of confidence and feel especially at home on the Bay of Palma. But the notoriously one sided sea breeze race track will place an unusually high premium on starting and gaining the first beneficial wind shift and charges a proportionately high tariff to those who fail to get off the start line well. Azzurra have proven to be one of this season’s best, most consistent starters but the crew will have to be at their very best, and stay out of trouble to pull off a third regatta win in a row.

Asked if they can win three events on the bounce, skipper-helm Parada replies:
?“Why not? We all start with the same chances and will give it everything we have. We have great memories of Palma and some bad ones but we remember every time we come here. The only worry coming to Palma is if you are slow and we have no big worries this season.”

Azzurra have a solid lead on the 52 SUPER SERIES season standings but Parada maintains the only focus is on winning the Copa del Rey

“We are not even thinking of results yet. We are sailing each day if it were the first one of the season.
When you start speculating you can only go backwards. We do not look the points yet as we want to win Copa del Rey.”

Talismanic Terry Hutchinson returns to 52 SUPER SERIES champions Quantum Racing, the 2014 defending champions will line up with owner-driver Doug DeVos on the helm and Hutchinson and Ado Stead in the roles of tactician and strategist. The champions were clearly moving in the right direction at the world championships but suffered a poor final day which saw them narrowly dropped from podium in a very close logjam of aggregate points. As the second event of the season to be sailed in this afterguard configuration and with visibly good speed at the World Championships there is every chance the Quantum Racing team can defend the Copa del Rey title which they won last year en route to their 52 SUPER SERIES title.

They may be debutants on the 52 SUPER SERIES but Steve and Heidi Benjamin’s crew which will race their newly acquired Spookie, formerly Interlodge, are hardly newcomers to grand prix racing. But it will be the American Olympic 470 medallist and the team’s first time racing their new boat and the learning curve will be steep for them among the white hot fleet. Their crew includes Peter Holmberg as tactician. Benjamin visited Valencia and sailed a practice race on the boat but the crew will only sail the boat for the first time together when they arrive in Palma.

“We are very excited but guarded in our expectations. We would be happy just to beat a few boats on this occasion. It is a new boat to us and it is our first event. We have several new guys on the team and some that I have sailed with a lot before. It will be my fourth regatta with Peter (Holmberg) who is an old friend.”
Benjamin declared on his departure from the US for Palma.
“I am frightened to death of all of the top teams, the Azzurras and Quantum Racing and so on. Azzurra do seem to be the favourites. We are looking forwards to being in the 52 SUPER SERIES which really is la crème de la crème.”

52 SUPER SERIES racing starts with the official practice race Monday and points racing from Tuesday.

Rolls-Royce Merlin, 1933-50 (all engine models), Owners’ Workshop Manual

B2187

The Rolls-Royce Merlin is almost certainly the best known aero engine around the world. There are some challengers of which the closest is probably the revolutionary Rolls-Royce Pegasus VSTOL jet engine. The Pegasus has been used only for the Harrier and Sea Harrier jump-jets, but the Merlin has powered a range of aircraft since its debut in 1933. It will forever be associated with the Hurricane and Spitfire of the Battle of Britain and publication of this new manual in the 75th anniversary year of the Battle of Britain is particularly appropriate. However, the Merlin powered British and US combat aircraft, including the Halifax and Lancaster heavy bombers and the incredible multi-role Mosquito. It also turned the P-51 Mustang from a potentially mediocre fighter to an outstanding escort fighter and ground attack fighter. Coupling the Mustang airframe to the license-built Packard Merlin provided the vital escort of 8th Air Force heavy bombers as they raided Germany in daylight. The Mustang had the range to stay with the bombers deep into Germany. It was also a potent interdiction fighter striking targets of opportunity across Occupied Europe. The author has produced very descriptive text and the manual follows the traditional Haynes format with lavish illustration in photographs, drawings and sketches. This is an excellent way to learn about the war-winning Merlin that went on to power Spanish-built versions of the Me-109 and He-111 in particular irony.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Rolls-Royce Merlin, 1933-50 (all engine models), Owners' Workshop Manual
DATE: 180615
FILE: R2187
AUTHOR: Ian Craighead
PUBLISHER: Haynes
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 157
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Schneider Trophy, racing seaplanes, Hon C S Rolls, Frederick Henry Royce, Eagle Merlin, R, Griffon, Spitfire, Hurricane, Mosquito, Mustang, Lancaster, Lancastrian, York, Amiot 356,Whitley, Halifax, Air Horse, Athena, P-40, Sea Hornet, Sea Hurricane, Seafire, Battle, Fulmar, Horsley, Nancu, HA-1109, Sturgeon, Type 322 Dumbo, Vickers Type 432, Welkin
ISBN: 978-0-85733-758-0
IMAGE: B2187.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/o8ptlwm
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Rolls-Royce Merlin is almost certainly the best known aero engine around the world. There are some challengers of which the closest is probably the revolutionary Rolls-Royce Pegasus VSTOL jet engine. The Pegasus has been used only for the Harrier and Sea Harrier jump-jets, but the Merlin has powered a range of aircraft since its debut in 1933. It will forever be associated with the Hurricane and Spitfire of the Battle of Britain and publication of this new manual in the 75th anniversary year of the Battle of Britain is particularly appropriate. However, the Merlin powered British and US combat aircraft, including the Halifax and Lancaster heavy bombers and the incredible multi-role Mosquito. It also turned the P-51 Mustang from a potentially mediocre fighter to an outstanding escort fighter and ground attack fighter. Coupling the Mustang airframe to the license-built Packard Merlin provided the vital escort of 8th Air Force heavy bombers as they raided Germany in daylight. The Mustang had the range to stay with the bombers deep into Germany. It was also a potent interdiction fighter striking targets of opportunity across Occupied Europe. The author has produced very descriptive text and the manual follows the traditional Haynes format with lavish illustration in photographs, drawings and sketches. This is an excellent way to learn about the war-winning Merlin that went on to power Spanish-built versions of the Me-109 and He-111 in particular irony.

Rolls was an enthusiastic advocate of motor vehicles and aircraft during their early years. He held pilot's License No. 2, helped to create the Royal Aero Club and won early air races. He was drawn to military use of his favoured technology and built what is almost certainly the best known motor vehicle in the history of motoring. In partnering with Royce, he had a great design backed by solid engineering to produce a supremely reliable motor car. He applied the same approach of sound engineering to the development of aircraft engines and his early death in an air crash was a great loss to the company, prompting the RR logo to change from red lettering to black.

Royce fought to maintain the aero engine business against some Board opposition and the Eagle entered service in 1916. It was a 12 cylinder V engine at a time when most aero engines were tricky rotary engines, with good power to weight ratios, or solid in-line engines that tended to deliver a much lower power to weight ration, if in return for improved reliability and removal of the centrifugal characteristic of the rotary engine. This later rotary characteristic cost many young pilots their lives but it did offer combat advantage to pilots who learned to exploit the feature, creating aircraft that today might be described as dynamically unstable.

The Eagle proved popular with engineers and pilots, powering a number of combat aircraft, including the Vickers Vimmy heavy bomber. It was the reliability of its twin Eagles that enabled Alcock and Brown to complete the first direct crossing of the Atlantic in 1919, mounted on a Vimmy bomber.

Rolls-Royce was to create a three branched family tree for its petrol engines. The Merlin was the final model of the longest tree. The shortest tree saw the Eagle XVI develop from the original 1916 Eagle and for the Vulture to develop from the XVI. Some will claim that this branch of development was the least successful but the Vulture did have some adherents. The slightly longer second tree included the Buzzard and the R with the Griffon developing from the Buzzard. The R was important as it was built for the Supermarine Schneider Trophy seaplanes and its performance won the Trophy permanently for Britain with three consecutive wins. The final race saw the Schneider float-plane achieve over 400 mph which, even with the massive floats introducing drag, was still twice the speed of front-line fighter aircraft of the time. The Griffon was to begin replacing the Merlin as a power-plant for Spitfires and heavy bombers. A feature of the Griffon was that it exploited the greater power output by employing contra-rotating propellers that provided the swept area a significantly larger diameter single propeller that would have been difficult/impossible to fit into an existing aircraft designed for the Merlin.

The longest branch of development from the original Eagle culminated in the Merlin. From the Eagle to the Falcon, to the Condor is a line from which the Buzzard developed to produce the R and the Griffon. The straight line down from the Condor led to the F.X and the Kestrel which produced the Peregrine as a spur from the main line and continued down to the Goshawk, P.V.12, to the Merlin.

When the Merlin was fitted to the first Hurricanes and Spitfires it spun a two bladed wooden propeller. This was standard for biplane fighters with in-line or V engines. Moving to a dual pitch three bladed propeller allowed more efficient exploitation of the Merlin's power, although some inexperienced pilots got into a muddle remembering whether to fly in course or fine pitch, with unfortunate results. The variable pitch propeller proved the effective solution. Four and five bladed propellers followed and work proceeded with contra-rotating propellers. This was essential to the development of ever more powerful Merlin models as the engine output doubled, requiring matching development of the propeller to enable the pilot to fully exploit the extra horsepower.

The Merlin was always in heavy demand and although production expanded, there were periods when everyone wanted to use the Merlin in their aircraft, or other vehicles, and rationing was inevitable. Packard began license production of the Merlin and this output was available to Canadian and US manufacturers and also provide a source of Merlins for fast attack craft. This had opened a whole new set of requirements, following on from early use of over-houred RAF Merlins that were taken for marine and other uses. Eventually the Merlin was allocated for the Cromwell tank which can claim to be the most effective British WWII tank design, exceeded only by the Centurion which began introduction into the British Army after WWII and which developed a successful export sales including models used by Israel in the various wars with her neighbours.

The author has done a good job, providing a mass of information in crisp text, ably supported by the highest quality illustration. This book is a must for all enthusiasts, but it also provides a very good entry point for those who have not previously been enthusiastic readers of military technology and deployment. Being able to appeal to both readerships is not easy and many books fail, but this is a happy exception. It is very much more than a review of the engine that powered the Hurricane and Spitfire through the Battle of Britain. It explains in an easy to follow style how Rolls Royce was set up, how it got into the aero engine business and how it developed the most potent military aero engine of the 1930s. It then describes how the engine worked and what the pilots and engineers thought of it. The legacy is explained and some very useful appendices add to the fund of carefully researched knowledge. Highly recommended.

Voices in Flight: RAF Escapers and Evaders in WWII

B2192 Another book from a well-established author of WWII RAF actions and activities that benefits from a strong and developing knowledge of his favoured topics. There are two excellent photo plate sections to support a well-researched text. There is good pace and the story is of the covert elements of war. This is a story of considerable bravery, both of the aircrew, evaders and escapers, but also of ordinary men and women in Occupied Europe who were prepared to risk their lives to help downed airmen and POWs who were trying to return to Britain to carry on the fight. This is a must-read book and should appeal to a wide readership. It contains inspiring stories that need to be recounted. reviews.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com bgn.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com   NAME: Voices in Flight: RAF Escapers and Evaders in WWII DATE: 180615 FILE: R2192 AUTHOR: Martin W Bowman PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword BINDING: hard back PAGES: 236 PRICE: £25.00 GENRE: Non Fiction SUBJECT: WWII, Second World War, World War Two, RAF, Bomber Command, Tactical Air Force, fighter sweeps, downed, aircrew, POWs, escapees, evaders, Resistance, escape lines, occupied territory ISBN: 1-78383-175-8 IMAGE: B2192.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nh54gyv LINKS: DESCRIPTION: Another book from a well-established author of WWII RAF actions and activities that benefits from a strong and developing knowledge of his favoured topics. There are two excellent photo plate sections to support a well-researched text. There is good pace and the story is of the covert elements of war. This is a story of considerable bravery, both of the aircrew, evaders and escapers, but also of ordinary men and women in Occupied Europe who were prepared to risk their lives to help downed airmen and POWs who were trying to return to Britain to carry on the fight. This is a must-read book and should appeal to a wide readership. It contains inspiring stories that need to be recounted. The massive air war over Europe meant that, British and Canadian aircrews, later joined by US aircrews, and airmen from around the British Empire and the 'Free Forces' aircrew who had escaped from their ravished countries to fight for the Allies, would involve a number of survivors of downed planes. As the air war continued the losses by Allied Air Forces were terrible. Fortunately a relatively large number survived and either went on the run in occupied territory, or were taken prisoner, only to escape and try to reach freedom. This is an entertaining collection of stories that will keep the reader turning pages to the end. There are some extraordinary stories that are stirring and emotional. The level of courage and determination of what were mainly young people, is amazing. A great read – don't miss it.

Bombing Germany: The Final Phase, The Destruction of Pforzheim and the Closing Months of Bomber Command’s War

B2193

The text flows smoothly and the illustrations are spread through the body of the book. The illustrations are many and this is a book where text and images support each other. The final stage of the bombing of Germany saw some relief for bomber crews as the German Air Force collapsed, but devastation for German cities and industrial areas. German propaganda continued to be effective and planted some false seeds in relation to the bombing of Dresden and other cities. The last phase of bombing was also the most complex, particularly in its political dimensions. This is a very good account of the last phase and every air war enthusiast will want a copy.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Bombing Germany: The Final Phase, The Destruction of Pforzheim and the Closing Months of Bomber Command's War
DATE: 180615
FILE: R2193
AUTHOR: Tony Reading
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 381
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, Second World War, World War Two, RAF, Bomber Command, Tactical Air Force, carpet bombing, radar bombing, USAAF, RAF, German Air Force, pathfinders
ISBN: 1-47382-354-4
IMAGE: B2193.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/n9brl24
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The text flows smoothly and the illustrations are spread through the body of the book. The illustrations are many and this is a book where text and images support each other. The final stage of the bombing of Germany saw some relief for bomber crews as the German Air Force collapsed, but devastation for German cities and industrial areas. German propaganda continued to be effective and planted some false seeds in relation to the bombing of Dresden and other cities. The last phase of bombing was also the most complex, particularly in its political dimensions. This is a very good account of the last phase and every air war enthusiast will want a copy.

The bombing campaign in Europe has been controversial and is likely to remain so. There is no alternative to compare it to. Had there been no bombing of German cities, would the war have been shorter or longer? We will never know for certain. From a very rocky start, the RAF gained strength and waged a relentless war against German targets. In the beginning, the RAF had the Wellington bomber, which was unique and loved by its crews, dependable and able to absorb punishment. The Sterling flew at the start of WWII but although it performed reasonably well as the first four engine heavy bomber for Bomber Command, it was very innovative and paid the price in reliability terms. It was few in numbers and the majority of the RAF bombers were already obsolescent first generation monoplanes, twin engined and light to medium bombers. They were not ideal for strategic bombing and their poor defensive armament and lack of close fighter escort made them very vulnerable.

From that first fragile stage of the RAF bombing campaign in Europe, the situation steadily improved. The Lancaster and Mosquito bombers were magnificent and the use of pathfinders to mark targets led to progressive improvements in accuracy. A flow of crews and new aircraft more than kept pace with the appalling casualties, and the USAAF bomber force came into operation with effective fighter escorts that made daylight bombing practical, if still painful in crew casualties. This middle phase of the air war in Europe saw the RAF and USAAF settling into a routine that was to increase the damage done to enemy targets and to population centres. Had the Germans been equipped with the numbers of heavy bombers, being sent against German targets by the Allies, at the beginning of WWII, they would have waged a very similar war on Britain and had already used bombing to devastating effect in the Spanish Civil War and in the invasions of Poland, the Low Countries and France. What spared Britain the destruction handed out to German targets was that the German Air Force was seen primarily as aerial artillery to support the panzers and infantry in lightning war. That resulted in the Germans lacking long range bombers and fighter escorts, and in their bombers having an ineffective defensive armament. This made the German Air Force effective as a tactical air force but inedequate for strategic bombardment. The total numbers were also inadequate to stage the size raids the Allies were eventually staging against German targets.

The use of radar for bomb aiming was a significant aid to the RAF Lancaster bombers. There was also use of 'window' metal foil strips dropped in clouds to confuse German defence radar. There had been a steady improvement in the range of bombs available. Where the start of WWII saw the 500 lb and 1000 lb bombs as the staple of bombing raids, the RAF began to receive specialist bombs, such as the 'bouncing bombs' used to attack German dams, and the size of bombs increased, leading to the 5 ton and 10 ton 'earthquake' bombs that were used against high value targets. The RAF was in a better position than the USAF because the Lancaster had a very large bomb bay that was not compartmented, allowing progressively larger bombs to be carried. However, there were also smaller, but terrible, bombs being introduced these incendiary and anti-personnel bombs could be dropped in large clusters.

Perhaps the greatest development was made practical by the ability of the RAF and USAF to operate around the clock. Each raid saw blast and incendiary bombs being dropped to rapidly increase temperature and suck in air to fuel the fires. This produced tornadoes in the German cities that consumed everything above ground and sucked people into the flames. The need of the fires for more oxygen also caused air to be sucked from underground shelters and many died from suffocation rather than from blast or fire.

By the final phase of the air war, the Allied bombers were displaying a terrible power, far beyond that available in 1939. There was a reducing pool of valuable targets and the situation on the German's Eastern Front created a need to bomb targets, such as Dresden, to prevent the German soldiers from escaping the Russian assault and building new defensive lines to prolong the war. By late 1944, the Germans were facing inevitable defeat. The vaunted German wonder weapons that were starting to emerge from shattered factories were too few in number to have much effect, and the one thing that new and existing aircraft both required was fuel and ammunition. A jet fighter without fuel was as useless as an Me 109 without fuel.

The author has presented a complete and well-researched account of the final phase of the bombing war in Europe. This is a book that is well worth reading.

from Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer, The Five Wars of Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris

B2191

This is a rewarding read and it debunks a few myths in the process. The subject was an adventurer, not uncommon in Victorian and Edwardian Britain. One of the great misconceptions of the air war on the Western Front during the Great War is that pilots were all spotty youths, fresh from school and unlikely to survive more than a few days. This book reads more like a 39 Steps era novel. Excellent account of an extraordinary individual.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: from Colonial Warrior to Western Front Flyer, The Five Wars of Sydney Herbert Bywater Harris
DATE: 180615
FILE: R2191
AUTHOR: Carole McEntee-Taylor
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 229
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, First World War, World War One, US 6th Cavalry, Klondike,, Boxer Rebellion,Philippines Insurrection, Royal Flying Corps, Spanish Civil War, RAFVR
ISBN: 1-47382-359-5
IMAGE: B2191.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/oflyge6
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a rewarding read and it debunks a few myths in the process. The subject was an adventurer, not uncommon in Victorian and Edwardian Britain. One of the great misconceptions of the air war on the Western Front during the Great War is that pilots were all spotty youths, fresh from school and unlikely to survive more than a few days. This book reads more like a 39 Steps era novel. Excellent account of an extraordinary individual.

The RNAS had many mature pilots, partly because of the innovative flying training program begun by the Royal Navy in 1911. Most of the RNAS pilots in the pre-WWI period were full Lieutenants from the Royal Navy and similar ranked officers from the Royal Marines Light Infantry and the Royal Marines Artillery. By 1914, they were already in their late 20s or older. Even after the massive expansion of British Forces after August 1914, the Royal Navy continued to train a higher proportion of mature officers as pilots and navigators because it was intended that they would have broad naval knowledge and experience. One source of recruits was from Coastal Forces where many torpedo boat skippers transferred to the RNAS and went on to be transferred into the RAF in 1918, when it was formed, and on through the peacetime service to fly in WWII.

The RFC was somewhat different and did include a great many very young and inexperienced pilots straight from school or college. These youngsters were the basis of a widespread belief that the RFC was almost entirely staffed by schoolboy pilots. The reality was that the RFC also included pilots who were older and had a great varied experience. The subject of this book is not unique but is perhaps unusual. The RFC had a number of challenges that the RNAS did not face. The RN had, for hundreds of years, been at the technological forefront in every generation. Naval officers had to sit exams and learn about the technology on which their ships depended and pioneered. The Army was composed of Regiments and Corps that enjoyed some autonomy and it was not long since Cardwell's Army Reforms stopped the practice of buying commissions. Even then there were creative ways around the reforms and 'established' Regiments took in cadets who were placed in harms way to justify the award of a field commission.

Most of the Army in 1914 still regraded aeroplanes as nasty noisy smelly things that frightened the horses. Pilots were often regarded as chauffeurs and that encouraged the Army to think of placing an officer in the back seat to be 'driven' around by an NCO, as he would be on land. That all began to change after 1914 and to demand for pilots led to the recruitment of very young newly minted 2nd Lieutenants.

The more unusual and mature recruits had already served Britain, or some other country, in one of the many small wars that flared up around the world before 1914. What they mostly had in common was a love of adventure. Where today a 'gap year' student might back-pack around the Pacific, the Edwardian adventurers went on gold rushes, whaling, sheep or cattle farming and ended up in civil wars, insurrections and larger, but still minor wars in China, India, Africa, or the Americas.

The author has traced the progress of one of theses adventurers. The style is comfortable and mobile. There is something of the novel in the range of experiences and emotions. There are also many well-chosen images to support the text and these provide a number of fresh insights. A good story, well-told.

Rigging, Period Fore-and-aft craft

B2190

There is very little text in this book, which is a collection of beautifully drawn images of period fore-and-aft craft. The text which is included is adequate to support the drawings. The drawings are impeccable. This is a very reasonably priced book, aimed at the model maker and particularly the scratch-build modeller who is either producing a model on the basis of a commercial kit that is greatly enhanced, or building from scratch to produce a unique model of high impact. For such modellers, a rigging book of this quality is a considerable aid, but it should also be considered by those readers who are building knowledge of period sailing craft and need to understand the finer points of period rigging. This book received a very favourable review from best selling author Julian Stockwin who is something of a perfectionist in his research for each of his Kydd and Renzi tales with a well-developed knowledge of naval craft of the Napoleonic War period.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bbn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Rigging, Period Fore-and-aft craft
DATE: 180615
FILE: R2190
AUTHOR: Lennarth Petersson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 111
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Period craft, sailing craft, model engineering, model making, rigging, rope work, small warships, 18th Century, 19th Century, Napoleonic wars
ISBN: 978-1-84832-218-9
IMAGE: B2190.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/o5uvww7
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: There is very little text in this book, which is a collection of beautifully drawn images of period fore-and-aft craft. The text which is included is adequate to support the drawings. The drawings are impeccable. This is a very reasonably priced book, aimed at the model maker and particularly the scratch-build modeller who is either producing a model on the basis of a commercial kit that is greatly enhanced, or building from scratch to produce a unique model of high impact. For such modellers, a rigging book of this quality is a considerable aid, but it should also be considered by those readers who are building knowledge of period sailing craft and need to understand the finer points of period rigging. This book received a very favourable review from best selling author Julian Stockwin who is something of a perfectionist in his research for each of his Kydd and Renzi tales with a well-developed knowledge of naval craft of the Napoleonic War period.

There is something truly magical about the naval craft from the days of sail. At the time they were the leading edge of technology and designed to provide a gun platform that could be fully controlled and survive in the harsh environment of the sea. Perhaps this explains why so many dream of building a beautiful scale model. What tends to deter these would-be modellers is the apparent complexity of rigging. The tangle of rope and blocks defies logic but, in the real ships, it is entirely logical and works very well.

This book looks at the British Naval Cutter, the French Lugger, and the American Schooner. These were solid work boats, built in some numbers, deployed around the world and heavily armed for their size. They were fast and highly maneoverable vessels that could be operated close in shore or on the vast expanses of ocean. They were often used for communication and reconnaissance, but they were also potent combat vessels that could hold their own against larger ships.

The author/illustrator has used his skills as a draughtsman and enthusiasm as an amateur model maker, to produce a fine set of drawings for each ship and in so doing filled a hole in published knowledge. For some reason, it can prove very difficult to find detailed drawings for completing a period model of this type of craft. It is a strange omission of the past that is happily corrected by this book. It is strange because this type of vessel makes an ideal subject for the home. The relatively small size of the fore-and-aft craft allows a very handsome model to be built to a relatively large scale, providing every opportunity to provide great detail and authenticity.

This book is naturally highly commended to its target audience, but anyone with an interest in sailing ships will find it an interesting source of information that can be very hard to find. In the process it makes sense of how and why these vessels were so important in their time.

Flight Craft 3, Hawker Hurricane and Sea Hurricane

B2189

A deceptively thin A4 format book with colour, black & white photographs with full colour drawings. The Flight Craft series is an interesting family of publications. It is aimed primarily at the model makers and model engineers, but it is in two parts. The first part is a very well written history of the subject with some fine photographs in illustration. The second part of the book provides some outstanding full colour drawings and reviews of plastic kits, some of which are now out of general sale and have become collectors items. The amount of information packed into the book is surprising and of very high quality. The author and his illustrators have provided model makers with many options to enhance standard plastic kits of the subject and modify them to replicate some interesting variations of the subject. An excellent publication which will satisfy serious model makers, but a first class book for the novice of all ages and for those who are enthusiasts of a remarkable aeroplane.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Flight Craft 3, Hawker Hurricane and Sea Hurricane
DATE: 180615
FILE: R2189
AUTHOR: Tony O'Toole, + Martin Derry, Neil Robinson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 97
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, Second World War, World War Two, shipboard aircraft, Hawker, Hurricane, Sea Hurricane, HurriBomber, Tank Killer, ground attack, point interceptor, monoplane, Merlin, RAF, FAA, PAF
ISBN: 1-47382-725-6
IMAGE: B2189.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ogfxe8k
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: A deceptively thin A4 format book with colour, black & white photographs with full colour drawings. The Flight Craft series is an interesting family of publications. It is aimed primarily at the model makers and model engineers, but it is in two parts. The first part is a very well written history of the subject with some fine photographs in illustration. The second part of the book provides some outstanding full colour drawings and reviews of plastic kits, some of which are now out of general sale and have become collectors items. The amount of information packed into the book is surprising and of very high quality. The author and his illustrators have provided model makers with many options to enhance standard plastic kits of the subject and modify them to replicate some interesting variations of the subject. An excellent publication which will satisfy serious model makers, but a first class book for the novice of all ages and for those who are enthusiasts of a remarkable aeroplane.

What is still not widely appreciated is just what made the Hurricane a vital new combat aircraft for a premier Air Force. At the time of its first flight, the standard RAF fighter aircraft were biplanes that were little different from those that flew during the later stages of WWI. They looked much the same, employed the same construction techniques and materials, and offered much the same performance. The Hawker Fury was one of the fastest fighters in service anywhere and achieved only 200 mph, little faster than the best machines of 1918. It carried the same two rifle calibre machine guns, had fixed undercarriage, open cockpit and wire braced wooden strutted biplanes. The only machine more advanced was the Gloster Gladiator which was a radial engined biplane of traditional structure with fixed undercarriage but included three innovations. The cockpit was enclosed by a sliding canopy, a radio-telephone was fitted to provide communication with other aircraft and fighter control rooms, and the traditional two rifle calibre machine guns mounted in the fuselage, where the pilot could reach the cocking mechanism to clear jams, set to fire through the propeller arc with an interrupter gear to safeguard the propeller, were now joined by two wing-mounted guns that fired outside the propeller arc. This latter innovation greatly increased the weight of fire striking a target, not just because there were two more guns, but because the wing-mounted guns could fire at the full rate of around 500 rounds per minute rather than the fuselage-mounted guns that were halted every time a propeller blade was about to pass in front of the gun muzzle. This interruption could half the rate of fire to around 250-300 rounds per minute. This meant that a typical 5 second burst of fire could land 75 rounds on the target aircraft instead of the traditional 25 rounds, greatly increasing the probability of achieving a 'kill'.

When the first Hurricane flew, it was a revolution operationally. The thick monoplane wing was able to include eight rifle calibre machine guns, all firing outside the propeller arc to achieve a rate of fire during a 3 second burst of a staggering 1340 rounds. It also carried a new reflector gun sight that was a huge advance over earlier wire and simple optic gunsights in general use for fighters at that time. The significant reduction in drag, achieved by losing the upper wing of a biplane, together with the magnificent Rolls Royce Merlin engine delivering a terrific 1,000 hp, enabled the Hurricane to achieve more than 300 mph, a 50% increase over the speed of the fastest biplane fighters and faster even than the new monoplane metal bombers that were entering service in Britain, Germany and other countries. The radio telephone was of improved performance and the widely spaced retractable undercarriage provided reliable grass field operation. The streamlined nose with its pointed propeller spinner was clad with metal panels and the designers had already thought of providing the pilot with armour to protect him from enemy fire. The first pilots to fly this amazing new machine were thrilled by its performance, its excellent stability as a gun platform, but the spectacular tuning rate and light-handed aerobatics made it truly exciting.

However, the Hurricane was remarkably similar to the Hawker Fury biplane. The steel and wood framing aft of the pilot and the fabric covering of aft fuselage and wings meant that the Hurricane still depended on traditional aircraft design and construction of the biplane era. This had three consequences. The Hurricane was much easier to build, maintain and repair than her Spitfire stable-mate. This enabled the Hurricane to enter service faster and become operational quickly. It also meant that the Hurricane was an excellent bomber killer, able to absorb battle damage. The smaller number of Spitfires accounted for far fewer 'kills' during the Battle of Britain, but it was a team effort with the faster Spitfire keeping the enemy fighter escort occupied while the Hurricanes concentrated on the bombers. The third consequence was that the Hurricane more rapidly reached the end of its development cycle and started to be relegated to secondary and ground attack duties, whilst the Spitfire was able to soldier on well into the jet age and form the basis for development of jet fighters. Against that, the Hurricane was much easier to develop into a shipboard fighter, with the wide track undercarriage being much more suitable for the small flight deck of a carrier.

This book not only provides a good history section and a review of plastic model kits, but it also describes how kits can be modified into accurate Sea Hurricane models.

German Naval Camouflage, Volume Two, 1942-1945

B2188

This is a specialist book for the professional and the serious enthusiast. The quality of illustration is consistently high throughout the book. It is the most comprehensive and authoritative work ever to be published on the colour schemes of the Kriegsmarine, containing the coverage of Volume 1 which took coverage to 1941. This second volume covers from 1942 to 1945. To those wishing to increase their knowledge of WWII naval activity, this is an excellent book, if perhaps at the upper end of the price range for those not yet serious enthusiasts. The publisher has a long tradition of running promotional campaigns with significant price reductions, so all is not lost for those who may struggle to justify the recommended price. The work cannot be too highly commended.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: German Naval Camouflage, Volume Two, 1942-1945
DATE: 180615
FILE: R2188
AUTHOR: Eric Leon, John Asmussen
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Frontline
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 168
PRICE: £35.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, Second World War, World War Two, German Navy, naval architecture, camouflage, warships, battleships, battle cruisers, armoured cruisers, heavy cruisers, light cruisers, destroyers, torpedo boats, shipboard aircraft
ISBN: 978-1-84832-223-3
IMAGE: B2188.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/neq35l5
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a specialist book for the professional and the serious enthusiast. The quality of illustration is consistently high throughout the book. It is the most comprehensive and authoritative work ever to be published on the colour schemes of the Kriegsmarine, containing the coverage of Volume 1 which took coverage to 1941. This second volume covers from 1942 to 1945. To those wishing to increase their knowledge of WWII naval activity, this is an excellent book, if perhaps at the upper end of the price range for those not yet serious enthusiasts. The publisher has a long tradition of running promotional campaigns with significant price reductions, so all is not lost for those who may struggle to justify the recommended price. The work cannot be too highly commended.

Although the principle objective has been to provide a unique collection of fine art work to show the camouflage patterns used by the Kriegsmarine, there is some very helpful text. The only slightly odd note is that the volume includes corrections for volume one. For serious enthusiasts and professionals, it is a very useful addition because they will already have a copy of volume one and sitting volume two next to it means that the corrections are readily available and bound in a volume so that they cannot become detached and lost. The less serious enthusiast might wonder why a comprehensive and authoritative work should require a number of corrections and then wonder how many errors are present in volume two. In fact, it demonstrates how serious the co-authors are and how they continue to uncover new material or evidence to question an accepted fact.

Hyundai Heavy to put ships on “Internet of Things”; Aker Philly to change name, sell shipping assets

56454570de0afb3ffc4a93d12bedd535 L

 

Hyundai Heavy to put ships on "Internet of Things"
July 16, 2015—Your refrigerator and home heating system can be linked to the "Internet of Things," so why not a ship? South Korean shipbuilding giant Hyundai Heavy Industries, and global management consulting, technology services and outsourcing company Accenture are collaborating to design a "connected smart ship" that will enable ship owners to better manage their fleets and achieve potential operational savings through the application of digital technologies.

bbn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

Industry News
Aker Philly to change name, sell shipping assets
AKPS's shipping assets consists of what it describes as "a potential exposure toward eight product tankers through its future interests in the four-ship AKPS-Crowley joint venture and its investment in Philly Tankers."

MAIB: Master tried to cover up grounding
The investigation identified that Vectis Eagle was unnecessarily close to the breakwater and that the turn was started too early.

NSC 5 sails away from Ingalls
National Security Cutters, the flagships of the Coast Guard's cutter fleet, are designed to replace the 378-foot Hamilton-class high-endurance cutters, which entered service during the 1960s.
Time running out for many product tankers to carry biofuels
New regulations on the carriage of biofuels could limit the trading flexibility of product tankers from next January.

Warships of the Great War Era, a History in Ship Models

B2185

The author followed an RN career as a pilot, then with a period as Curator of the Fleet Air Arm Museum, before becoming a successful author of many highly regarded books. Naturally, he started with books covering aspects of naval aviation, but this new book provides a valuable review of warships of the Great War Era. Surprisingly, there have been very few books published on the same topic and those that have appeared have tended towards a narrow selection of classes and relied on drawings and photographs. This book follows a different path and features the history of warships through professional models. It is incredible that Britain has failed so spectacularly to preserve vintage warships that have not only been important to the Royal Navy, but marked a new standard in warship design. It is necessary to travel to the US to see a preserved battleship of the Great War Era. In Britain there is no Dreadnought or pre-Dreadnought or post-Dreadnought to view. The revolutionary early aircraft carriers all died in the breakers yard. Cruisers, destroyers and submarines have faired equally badly. There are many photographs and drawings, but these do not convey all of the character of warships that broke boundaries and took naval warfare to a new level. So strange when Britain literally led the World. However, there are many surviving models that all too often lurk in the recesses of museums or in the rarely viewed reserve collections that are hidden away because the museum lacks space to present them to visitors. This book is therefore not only very informative but it reminds us that these highly detailed models exist and provide a presentation of the character of the real warships that have sadly passed to scrap. An enjoyable and recommended book.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Warships of the Great War Era, a History in Ship Models
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2185
AUTHOR: David Hobbs
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 128
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, war at sea, tactics, naval architecture, naval engineering, strategy, technology, warships, Royal Navy, models, shipyard models, museum exhibits
ISBN: 978-1-84832-212-7
IMAGE: B2185.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/pggb396
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author followed an RN career as a pilot with a period as Curator of the Fleet Air Arm Museum before becoming a successful author of many highly regarded books. Naturally, he started with books covering aspects of naval aviation, but this new book provides a valuable review of warships of the Great War Era. Surprisingly, there have been very few books published on the same topic and those that have appeared have tended towards a narrow selection of classes and relied on drawings and photographs. This book follows a different path and features the history of warships through professional models. It is incredible that Britain has failed so spectacularly to preserve vintage warships that have not only been important to the Royal Navy, but marked a new standard in warship design. It is necessary to travel to the US to see a preserved battleship of the Great War Era. In Britain there is no Dreadnought or pre-Dreadnought or post-Dreadnought to view. The revolutionary early aircraft carriers all died in the breakers yard. Cruisers, destroyers and submarines have faired equally badly. There are many photographs and drawings, but these do not convey all of the character of warships that broke boundaries and took naval warfare to a new level. So strange when Britain literally led the World. However, there are many surviving models that all too often lurk in the recesses of museums or in the rarely viewed reserve collections that are hidden away because the museum lacks space to present them to visitors. This book is therefore not only very informative but it reminds us that these highly detailed models exist and provide a presentation of the character of the real warships that have sadly passed to scrap. An enjoyable and recommended book.

Most detailed warship models were constructed with the same care and attention as was applied to their full size facsimiles. Very often, they were marketing aids to present a 3D impression of a warship that was at least state-of-the-art, or frequently a revolutionary design that significantly advanced the technology of marine warfare. In the closing decades of the 19th Century, the major navies were all moving to steel and armoured warships that were designed from the start to be powered by coal-fired steam. They featured gunnery direction, long range and increased firepower that was mainly mounted in barbets or turrets that were trained and elevated by powered controls, with their guns fed through the breech. This was a major advance over the previous designs that had continued to employ many of the materials and technologies that would have been familiar to Nelson, albeit with the inclusion of steam power, along with a full sailing rig. It was to be expected that the largest navies would move rapidly to replace the earlier designs with these new vessels and their greater capabilities. As it took time to build a ship, and the cost was not insignificant, Britain, Germany and their allies would enter WWI with many of these early steam-powered steel ships.

However, Britain started the 20th Century with a major advance in the form of HMS Dreadnought. Not only was Dreadnought a very powerful addition to the RN, it was so advanced that navies around the World began to describe capital ships as 'pre-dreadnought' and 'dreadnought'. As Britain and Germany engaged in an arms race, the Dreadnought design was further enhanced to produce what some refer to as super dreadnought and others as post-dreadnought, these being in effect the final classes of battleship that were made obsolescent by the equally dramatic introduction by Britain of the purpose-designed aircraft carrier.

Many tend to focus so intently on battleship and carrier design that all the other equally important classes of warships receive far less coverage than they deserve.

In the years leading into the Great War, a number of new ship types and weapons were coming into service. The submarine and the smaller warships depended more on the locomotive torpedo than on the gun. However, one of the most dangerous weapons was to prove to be the relatively cheap and simple sea mine. During the Great War, huge minefields were laid in an attempt to apply blockades. They proved highly effective and added danger because those mines that broke their moorings drifted unpredictably and continued to be lethal even after the end of hostilities.

As a result, further new classes of warship were introduced to fight submarines and minefields. There were also attempts to enhance battle-fleets and the use of battle cruisers and heavy cruisers introduced a new form of capital ship, fast, heavily armed and, to some degree armoured, but intended to be faster than battleships and suitable as an advanced screen ahead of the main fleet.

At the other end of the scale were the new Fast Torpedo Boats. These vessels carried a torpedo and a light gun armament depending on their speed to attack the great warships and escape before they could be sunk. These relatively inexpensive vessels with their tiny crews could seriously damage or sink a capital ship. They were powered by petrol engines and mostly built of wood.

The author has done an excellent job of using full colour images of detailed warship models to present this period of incredible change in the nature of war at sea. He has also included Q-Ships, Auxillary warships, river gunboats, merchantmen at war and hospital ships. He has included boats and boat stowage which is a combination of old and new. The open rowing boat was still carried by warships, but steam pinnaces and petrol/parafin-powered boats were being added to warships and the Carley raft was being added as a simple but effective escape system for warships of all sizes. One strength of the Carley raft was that it could survive damage that would fatally damage a wooden, oar, or engine-powered, ship's boat.

A great book and very informative.