DVD Review – Agincourt 1415

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This excellent DVD is part of the growing 100 Years War collection. Once again the BHTV team is supported by a re-enactment group, this time the Medieval Combat Society and by French historian Francois Wicart.

Location filming and another crisp production of well lit footage has produced an enjoyable and absorbing account of one of the great European battles. Once again history repeats itself as terrain forces the conduct of war with battles fought over the same ground across the generations.

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DVD Review – Agincourt 1415

KB0162

 

This excellent DVD is part of the growing 100 Years War collection. Once again the BHTV team is supported by a re-enactment group, this time the Medieval Combat Society and by French historian Francois Wicart.

Location filming and another crisp production of well lit footage has produced an enjoyable and absorbing account of one of the great European battles. Once again history repeats itself as terrain forces the conduct of war with battles fought over the same ground across the generations.

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NAME: Agincourt 1415
CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews
FILE: K0162
DATE: 020714
PRESENTER(S): Tim Saunders, Andrew Duff, Mike Peters, Francois Wicart
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital
MEDIA: DVD
FORMAT: Dual layer
RUNTIME: 100 minutes
PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player
INTERNET:
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: Middle Ages, Medieval battles, France, Burgundy, Gascony, Henry V, Edward III, Harfleur, Crecy, archers, canon, mounted Knights, armour, men-at-arms
ISBN: 0-24762-032-7
IMAGE: KB0162
VIDEO:
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nyycfj3
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This excellent DVD is part of the growing 100 Years War collection. Once again the BHTV team is supported by a re-enactment group, this time the Medieval Combat Society and by French historian Francois Wicart.

Location filming and another crisp production of well lit footage has produced an enjoyable and absorbing account of one of the great European battles. Once again history repeats itself as terrain forces the conduct of war with battles fought over the same ground across the generations.

BHTV has developed its own unique signature as a history video producer. The team provide a selection of members for each production and their experiences as soldiers, researchers and battlefield guides introduces a level of authenticity and knowledge that is so often lacking in other offerings covering similar topics that appear on broadcast television. In fairness to these lesser products, the presenters are not necessarily either interested in the subject, or knowledgeable. They would be equally comfortable developing their celebrity in any field and frequently with no greater success. There is also a feeling in made-for television history programmes that the broadcasters desire to introduce tension and suspense, as for a fictional work, has been allowed to intrude on historical accuracy and efficacy.

BHTV clearly start with a balanced research programme and then film on location with a clear idea of where they are heading and a desire to remain grounded in the historic realities. The soldier's eye always comes to the fore in a firm understanding of the importance of the terrain to the conduct of the battle or campaign being presented.

Agincourt is yet another battle where English arms have triumphed in an most unpromising situation and in the lengthy conflict with France have provided another example of the apparent genetic ability of the French to firmly grasp defeat from the jaws of victory.

Henry V was leading a small and depleted Anglo/Welsh Army, that was suffering widespread sickness, to safety and home. His Army included the famous Welsh archers who had contributed success to so many other battles. He also had batteries of the new canon, although these were not yet at the point of development to provide a dependable force and their weight was hardly helpful to a weakened armed force that was in retreat.

Against this, the French had all the apparent advantages to ensure victory. They were present in significantly greater numbers, unaffected by sickness and a shortage of supplies, they were on home ground, and they were across the English line of retreat, with the advantage of waterways and crossing points to their favour.

Historians will for ever argue about the reasons for this unlikely English victory, but the basic characteristics were again in view. The French pride and notions of chivalry of a military class of armoured knights did not stand well against the discipline, courage and endurance of a largely yeoman army where its noble knights fought on foot in the battle line with the yeomen. The English had a handful of men-at-arms and an even smaller force of artillery. The French notions of chivalry did not sit well with the new technology of gunpowder and the English were more effective in embracing and integrating this new weaponry.

To the basic characteristics there are the intangibles of luck, weather and opportunities seized. What seems like luck is just a combination of opportunities presenting on the field and the ability of one commander to see and grasp favourable opportunity faster that the opponents.

The Medieval Combat Society bring their knowledge and enthusiasm to the BHTV team and provide a level of detail that makes the distant past visible and vivid.

As with other DVDs from BHTV, the viewer can feel part of the story and relate to the enthusiasm of presenters who have a great enthusiasm for their subject, a lifetime of related experience, and an ability to present in a fluid and understandable manner.

Yet another great BHTV exposure of one of the great battles of history.

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DVD Review – The Hawker Hurricane

KB0164   The Spitfire may have won the glory, but the Hurricane initially outperformed German 109 fighters and achieved a much higher kill rate in the Battle of Britain, but it was a partnership with the Spitfire where the differing capabilities of the two fighters complimented each other. This is one of those videos that must be watched.   reviews.firetrench.com   adn.firetrench.com   bgn.firetrench.com   nthn.firetrench.com   ftd.firetrench.com NAME: The Hawker Hurricane CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews FILE: K0164 DATE: 020714 PRESENTER(S): original film PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital MEDIA: DVD FORMAT: Dual layer RUNTIME: 100 minutes PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player INTERNET: PRICE: £12.99 GENRE: Non-Fiction SUBJECT: World War Two, WWII, Second World War, war in the air, aerial combat, tchnology, RAF, Hurricane, Hawker ISBN: 0-24762-096-3 IMAGE: KB0164 VIDEO: BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/obzvncj LINKS: DESCRIPTION: Pen & Sword are a prolific publisher of fine military history books and are now rapidly expand their range of electronic publications in the form of ebooks and DVDs. Their DVD range includes video produced mainly or entirely from wartime film and propaganda film from a number of production sources. These sources are arranged into groups and this DVD is from the World War II Primary Sources, meaning that it has not been updated or edited by a modern production company. As a result, some footage looks its age when included in a modern digital video compilation. The footage exception being film of one of the last flying urricanes. The viewer is unlikely to be put off in any way because, where a small amount of footage shows signs of its age, the methods of processing, and the storage for more than seven decades, it adds to the atmosphere and authenticity of the DVD. This is genuinely the ultimate primary source guide to the aircraft that helped save Britain in 1940 and flew on through the war and into the times that followed victory. The Hurricane was designed to reduce the risks of migrating from biplanes to monoplanes. The first Hurricanes had a fixed pitch two-bladed propeller just like the contemporary Hawker Fury biplane fighter. The cockpit was enclosed by a sliding plexiglass hood where the Fury was still open cockpit. In place of twin machine guns firing through the propeller arc, the Hurricane had four rifle calibre machine guns in each wing, firing outside the propeller. This gave approximately eight times the weight of shell hitting the target over the Fury's weight of shell. Accuracy was provided by a reflector gun sight. HF radiotelephone communication was fitted to the Hurricane, providing the communication to take full advantage of the new radar assisted command and control network covering Britain. The most obvious difference from the Fury was that the Hurricane had a low mounted broad cord monoplane wing in place of the Fury's wire and strut based biplanes. After take off, the retractable undercarriage of the Hurricane was another difference that was obvious. In common with the Fury, the early Hurricanes were almost entirely fabric covered with a tube and former construction method almost identical with the Fury. Although the Hurricane and Fury had similar contours, the Hurricane was fitted with the Merlin engine that was to power other outstanding British aircraft, including the Spitfire, Mosquito and Lancaster. This and the reduced drag of the monoplane gave the early Hurricane a staggering hundred miles per hour speed advantage over the Fury but still retained great manoeuvrability. After introduction, ahead of the Spitfire, the Hurricane was fitted with later Merlin marks and a three bladed variable-pitch propeller. Four 20mm canon replaced the machine guns and some Hurricanes were fitted with 30 mm anti-tank guns, or a mixed canon and machine gun armament. The fabric covering was progressively replaced by metal skinning but still on a tube and former frame, that continued to allow the aircraft to survive heavy punishment that destroyed other monoplanes of the time. After 1940, the Hurricane was increasingly assigned to the ground attack roll and was able to carry bombs or rockets. Some exhausted RAF Hurricanes were transferred to the Fleet Air Arm for semi-suicide convoy defence being catapulted from merchant ships with no chance of making land or being able to land on a ship. The Spitfire may have won the glory, but the Hurricane initially outperformed German 109 fighters and achieved a much higher kill rate in the Battle of Britain, but it was a partnership with the Spitfire where the differing capabilities of the two fighters complimented each other. This is one of those videos that must be watched.
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DVD Review – Spitfire, Combat Operations 1939-1945

KB0163   Pen & Sword are a prolific publisher of fine military history books and are now rapidly expanding their range of electronic publications in the form of ebooks and DVDs. Their DVD range includes video produced mainly or entirely from wartime film and propaganda film from a number of production sources. These sources are arranged into groups and this DVD is from the World War II Primary Sources, meaning that it has not been updated or edited by a modern production company. As a result, some footage looks its age when included in a modern digital video compilation. The viewer is unlikely to be put off in any way because, where a small amount of footage shows signs of its age, the methods of processing, and the storage for more than seven decades, it adds to the atmosphere and authenticity of the DVD. reviews.firetrench.com   adn.firetrench.com   bgn.firetrench.com   nthn.firetrench.com   ftd.firetrench.com NAME: Spitfire, Combat Operations 1939-1945 CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews FILE: K0163 DATE: 020714 PRESENTER(S): Official Wartimne Documentaries PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital MEDIA: DVD FORMAT: Dual layer RUNTIME: 100 minutes PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player INTERNET: PRICE: £12.99 GENRE: Non-Fiction SUBJECT: World War Two, WWII, Second World War, war in the air, aerial combat, technology, RAF, Spitfire, Supermarine ISBN:0-24762-064-5 IMAGE: KB0163 VIDEO: BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ld45mtc LINKS: DESCRIPTION: Pen & Sword are a prolific publisher of fine military history books and are now rapidly expanding their range of electronic publications in the form of ebooks and DVDs. Their DVD range includes video produced mainly or entirely from wartime film and propaganda film from a number of production sources. These sources are arranged into groups and this DVD is from the World War II Primary Sources, meaning that it has not been updated or edited by a modern production company. As a result, some footage looks its age when included in a modern digital video compilation. The viewer is unlikely to be put off in any way because, where a small amount of footage shows signs of its age, the methods of processing, and the storage for more than seven decades, it adds to the atmosphere and authenticity of the DVD. This is genuinely the ultimate primary source guide to the aircraft that helped save Britain in 1940 and flew on through the war and into the times that followed victory. The three public information and training films provide a fascinating look at a great battle-winning weapon with spotting information that helps to understand the succession of Spitfire Marks that enabled it to meet newer generations of German aircraft and expand its envelop of operation. Where the Hawker Hurricane was a low risk development of biplane technology and construction into a very stable monoplane gun platform that could absorb a great deal of damage, the Spitfire was a thoroughbred that demanded great care in manufacture and operation but rewarded the pilot with a supremely fast and nimble fighter. To the end of its service in the 1950s, the Spitfire continued to demonstrate some of its original design flaws that were both part of a great advantage as a fighter, but also limiting factors. The undercarriage with its narrow track continued to be a problem right up to the final Marks. The short range was never entirely addressed, and repair continued to present as much a problem as it had during production. Visibility during taxi, and ability to withstand the shock of carrier landings continued to challenge pilots. If Britain had only had the Spitfire in 1940 it would have lost the Battle of Britain and the same could be said if the only fighter available had been the Hurricane. Together these aircraft complimented each other and made victory possible. This is one of those videos that must be watched.
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DVD Review – 95th Rifles, 1809 to Salamanca

KB0161

This DVD will appeal to a wide audience, not least because of the success of the fictional “Sharpe” stories and television feature length films. Once again the value of Living History enthusiasts is shown by BHTV. This has become a strong movement of enthusiasts who re-create battles from history and serve as a living museum. In the process, they develop a great knowledge of the detail of the society and the military environments they re-create. In this DVD they show their dedication to reproducing the clothing and equipment faithfully from careful research and it is some of the fine details that really make a battle or a war click into place.

Another outstanding DVD.

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NAME: 95th Rifles, 1809 to Salamanca
CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews
FILE: K0161
DATE: 020714
PRESENTER(S): Tim Saunders, Andrew Duff, Mike Peters
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital
MEDIA: DVD
FORMAT: Dual layer
RUNTIME: 105 minutes
PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player
INTERNET:
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: Peninsular War, Napoleonic Wars, Portugal, Spain, Wellington, Wellesley, Baker rifle, skirmishers, snipers, special forces, elite troops, musket, Brown Bess, Chosen Men
ISBN: 0-24762-038-6
IMAGE: KB0161
VIDEO:
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/l344vya
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The BHTV is producing a stunning range of military and intelligence history videos. The team features former soldiers and battlefield guides working with historians and re-enactment groups. The result is that a colourful absorbing presentation is achieved that provides depth to the history and benefits from a soldier's eye for terrain which so strongly influences the choice of battlefield and the conduct of the engagement.

For many viewers, the first introduction may well have been the “Sharpe” stories that have made such popular novels and been turned into exciting films for television. Well-researched though these tales may be, they are fiction and the author was free to turn history to creative advantage. This DVD provides detail beyond what is possible and desirable in a novel and sets the story of The Rifles into its true historic perspective.

Shot on location in Iberia, the DVD includes explanations by re-enactment enthusiasts of the uniform and equipment of The Rifles and how they fitted into the British Army deployed to Portugal. Their faithfully reproduced equipment demonstrates how The Rifles operated in Iberia.

BHTV has been working through the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars with a series of beautifully produced DVDs in a number of series. This DVD is part of The Peninsular Collection and where ever a viewer starts into the series, it is likely to become an enduring interest and require the acquisition of all of the DVDs in this series and in the related series of the period. One of the great achievements of the BHTV team is that each series and each DVD in a series is the product of a combination of researchers, presenters and guides that is a close fit with the subject, including officers who have served in the successors to the units covered by the DVD collections. The level of knowledge and pride in the subject is something that is never achieved in the many history series made for television broadcasting, because the presenters do not usually share the enthusiasm, knowledge and pride in the subjects that the BHTV team demonstrate.

In this DVD, the progress of the Peninsular War from 1809 to Salamanca is followed and the part played by the 95th Rifles is ably shown. It includes the interactions of the principle characters on both sides and the way in which The Rifles and its officers related to the other British Regiments and formations.

This period is the story of how the British under Wellesley established their hold on Portugal and the ability to move into Spain, heading for France. 1810 saw Marshal Massena driving the British towards the sea, with the Rifles playing a key part in what was a relatively successful withdrawal, protecting the Light Brigade. 1811 saw the British driving the French back to Spain with The Rifles snapping at their heels and proving the value of a well-aimed rifle above the muskets of the other British and French Regiments. By 1812, with Napoleon occupied in Russia, Wellington took the offensive and climaxed with Wellington and Marshal Marmont seeking to gain a decisive advantage with a great battle on the Plains of Salamanca.

This DVD will appeal to a wide audience, not least because of the success of the fictional “Sharpe” stories and television feature length films. Once again the value of Living History enthusiasts is shown by BHTV. This has become a strong movement of enthusiasts who re-create battles from history and serve as a living museum. In the process, they develop a great knowledge of the detail of the society and the military environments they re-create. In this DVD they show their dedication to reproducing the clothing and equipment faithfully from careful research and it is some of the fine details that really make a battle or a war click into place.

Another outstanding DVD.

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DVD Review – Bletchley Park and the Ultra Secret

KB0160 The BHTV is producing a stunning range of military and intelligence history videos. The most numerous titles are field battles and wars, but this new DVD demonstrates that their unique presentation style works equally well in the somewhat different environment of intelligence work. reviews.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com brn.firetrench.com bsd.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: Bletchley Park and the Ultra Secret CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews FILE: K0160 DATE: 020714 PRESENTER(S): Tim Saunders, Tom Dormer, Iain Standen, Joel Greenburg PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital MEDIA: DVD FORMAT: Dual layer RUNTIME: 100 minutes PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player INTERNET: PRICE: £12.99 GENRE: Non-Fiction SUBJECT: World War Two, Second World War, WWII, decryption, encryption, Enigma, SIGINT, code-breakers, intelligence, radio interception, Polish Intelligence Service ISBN: 0-24762-114-5 IMAGE: KB0160 VIDEO: BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/oaq384v LINKS: DESCRIPTION: The BHTV is producing a stunning range of military and intelligence history videos. The most numerous titles are field battles and wars, but this new DVD demonstrates that their unique presentation style works equally well in the somewhat different environment of intelligence work. Britain was quick to appreciate the opportunities for intelligence gathering as radio was introduced to military communications. The Royal Navy saw that a series of listening posts could use direction finding techniques to triangulate on any ship, in any ocean that was transmitting back to its base, or to other ships. As the first triangulation stations came into service before the outbreak of WWI, the RN also appreciated that “signal chatter” could disclose useful intelligence by showing departures from normal levels of traffic. That technique was to identify the intention of the German High Seas Fleet to sail out to challenge the RN in a set piece naval gun battle. As the RN developed its signal intelligence operation, it was seen that there was a need for code-breaking of intercepted signals that were initially made in Morse code as wireless telegraphy. Radio telephony was still very much in its infancy and employed in relatively short range communication between aircraft and local ground stations. In the period before and during WWI, code-breaking relied on human capabilities because practical computers had not yet arrived. After 1918, the British intelligence services continued to develop their radio intercept systems and the Government Code and Cypher School (GC&CS) was established and relocated to Bletchley Park for WWII, as a less vulnerable location to bombing. Through WWII, Bletchley Park not only developed code-breaking techniques and radio intercept systems, but also developed the first electronic computers. At the end of WWII, the Bletchley operation moved to Cheltenham and a number of outstations in Britain and overseas. It became known as GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters) a title deliberately intended to confuse outsiders into thinking it was some kind of GPO (later British Telecom) communications research centre. Also established was CESG (Communications Electronics Security Group) that took some duties from GCHQ code intercept and breaking operations and undertook to develop techniques of defence of sensitive information. The DVD covers the WWII operations at Bletchley very well and the BHTV team are ably assisted by those involved in developing the Bletchley Park Trust. It provides a detailed history of Bletchley Park from its vital wartime operations to the site's conversion into a museum in 1993. There is a wealth of inside knowledge that adds further information to explain the many complexities of everyday life at Bletchley during the war. This is further enhanced by interviews with some of the survivors from the wartime operation. There is still much that has not been revealed about Bletchley and its outstations because the work continues and includes techniques and systems developed from 1939. However this DVD provides the most detailed and balanced coverage of the history and provides fascinating insights into the people and the society that developed there. Also covered is the valuable contribution to British code-breaking by the Polish Intelligence Service. The techniques pioneered by the Polish Service before the outbreak of war and the early German Enigma machines gave Bletchley a head start in the early stages of the war. The Polish techniques soon became obsolete as new Engima machines were developed and deployed and the Lorenz machines came into operation. At that point, Bletchley had to develop its own techniques and some amazing electronic machines that were to create the computer revolution after WWII that has changed society around the globe. However, this in no way minimizes the enormous contribution made by Poles to the huge success of Bletchley and its contribution to ensuring victory and reducing the length of WWII by perhaps three years. Having the head-start provided by the Poles not only delivered early valuable intelligence on German operations, but it developed the approaches from which later Bletchley innovations grew. This is an excellent video, based of thorough research and presented by a team that has developed its own unique and authoritative style. The video is well lit and edited to provide a smooth presentation of a very complex subject, capturing the human elements of the story. A video not to be missed.
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ISAF Youth Match Race Worlds Action Heats Up In Helsinki

worldsailing

Thursday 24 July 2014
Issued on behalf of ISAF
The ISAF Youth Match Racing World Championship on water action matched the warm climate as the competition heated up on the second day in Helsinki, Finland.

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Temperatures in Helsinki reached a new summer high but that not did stop the on-water action with 12 more flights completed. The situation is incredibly tight ahead of the last ten flights.

The day commenced at 09:45 local time with one flight in a dying breeze. As the wind filled in, racing resumed at 11:45 with a 10-11 knot breeze ensuring fair racing across the remaining flights.

Joachim Aschenbrenner (DEN) is sitting with level with Sam Gilmour (AUS) on 8-2 at the top, matching each other blow for blow. Overnight leader Nevin Snow (USA) sits on eight points but counts three losses.

The trio are followed by Mark Lees (GBR) at 7-2 and Valerio Galati (ITA), Pierre Quiroga (FRA) and Chris Steele (NZL) on 7-3.

One notable thing about the regatta thus far is the comments from the Umpires and Race Committee about the behaviour of the young sailors. Cool, calm and composed heads ensures that match racing is truly a gentleman's sport in the youth division.

The racing continues on Friday at 09:30 local time. The forecast is for similar conditions with a lot of sun and heat, but luckily also some wind.

2014 ISAF Youth Match Racing World Championship Results:
Joachim Aschenbrenner, DEN 8-2
Sam Gilmour, AUS 8-2
Nevin Snow, USA 8-3
Mark Lees, GBR 7-2
Valerio Galati, ITA 7-3
Pierre Quiroga, FRA 7-3
Chris Steele, NZL 7-3
Nelson Mettraux, SUI 5-5
Tyler Rice, ISV 5-6
Markus Ronnberg, FIN 4-5
Philip Bendon, IRL 4-6
Jakob Klitte, SWE 3-7
Slawomir Plichta, POL 1-8
Florian Haufe, GER 1-9
Vladislav Abramov, RUS 0-11

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Testing Completed on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope Backplane

14-178

The backplane of NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope was mounted to a structure for static load testing to verify it can support the stiffness required to keep the optics in alignment, and maintain the strength to support launch loads.
Image Credit: Northrop Grumman

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has reached another development milestone with the completion of static load testing of its primary mirror backplane support structure (PMBSS) moving the telescope one step closer to its 2018 launch.

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The PMBSS is the stable platform that holds the telescope's science instruments and the 18 beryllium mirror-segments that form the 21-foot-diameter primary mirror nearly motionless while the telescope peers into deep space. The primary mirror is the largest mirror in the telescope -- the one starlight will hit first.

"Static testing demonstrates the backplane has the structural integrity to withstand the forces and vibrations of launch and is the final test prior to starting the integration of the backplane with the rest of the telescope," said Lee Feinberg, NASA’s Optical Telescope Element manager at the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

The Northrop Grumman Corporation and ATK of Magna, Utah, completed the testing before delivering the structure to Northrop Grumman's facilities in Redondo Beach, California.

"This is the largest, most complex cryogenically stable structure humans have ever built," said Scott Texter, Optical Telescope Element manager for Northrop Grumman. "Completion of the static testing verifies it can hold the weight it is designed to hold. Now the structural backbone of the observatory is officially verified and ready for integration."

Despite its size and complexity, the PMBSS is one of the most lightweight precision-alignment truss structures ever designed and built. When fully deployed, it measures approximately 24 feet tall by 19.5 feet wide by more than 11.5 feet deep, and weighs only 2,180 pounds. Once fully assembled and populated, the PMBSS will support a mission payload and instruments that weigh more than 7,300 pounds. With a full launch load, it will support the equivalent of 12 times its own weight.

The PMBSS is designed to minimize changes in the shape of the telescope caused when one side is hotter than the other. While the telescope is operating at a range of extremely cold temperatures, between -406 and -343 degrees Fahrenheit, the backplane must not move more than 38 nanometers, approximately 1/1,000 the diameter of a human hair.

Under contract from NASA, Northrop Grumman is the lead contractor for the design and development of the Webb telescope's optics, sunshield and spacecraft. ATK designed, engineered and constructed more than 10,000 parts for the PMBSS at its facilities in Magna. They used composite parts, lightweight graphite materials, state-of-the-art material sciences and advanced fabrication techniques to build the structure.

The next step for the space telescope is to integrate the composite structures with the deployment mechanisms to create the overall Optical Telescope Element (OTE) structure. The OTE structure will then be shipped to Goddard for integration with the mirrors. NASA and Northrop Grumman will perform cryogenic testing of the PMBSS structure after mirror integration is complete.

The James Webb Space Telescope is the world's next-generation space observatory and successor to NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Designed to be the most powerful space telescope ever built, Webb will observe the most distant objects in the universe, provide images of the first galaxies formed and see unexplored planets around distant stars. The Webb telescope is a joint project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency.

For more information about NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/webb

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Another C-5M Goes West

0206-MP14-0965 005 TDN

Lockheed Martin photo by Thinh D. Nguyen.

MARIETTA, Ga. July 1, 2014 - A U.S. Air Force crew ferried the 20th C-5M Super Galaxy to Travis Air Force Base, California, from the Lockheed Martin [NYSE: LMT] facilities here on June 30.

Travis' second Super Galaxy, Aircraft 85-0010 was delivered 28 days ahead of the contracted schedule. A total of 52 Super Galaxy aircraft are scheduled to be delivered to the Air Force.

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FIRE Project update

firecartoon

Readers will have noticed changes in the presentation of our news and information portals this year.

Since January, we have been testing various items of new software and modifications. This work is nearing conclusion.

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When the FIRE (Flexible Information Retrieval Environment) Project started in 1995, it was staffed by volunteers from the Firetrench Consortium and operated as a community news and information service.

Initially, we based the system on technologies developed for specialist government agencies. Originally this was military command, control, and intelligence systems that were later adapted to power civil Emergency Operations Centers. One of our members proposed an experiment to adapt these technologies to the very different conditions found on the Internet at that time and which have evolved significantly over the last two decades. It was agreed to run this experiment within our Community Service Program that was originally set up to help members call on colleagues for help in various voluntary activities, aimed at serving our communities.

Since the project started the user base has increased considerably, our initial volunteer group has aged, and the frequency of hostile attack of many portals linked to the Internet has increased. Although our volunteers continue to work at the leading edge of certain technologies, aging inevitably thins out our numbers and reduces the number of hours some volunteers are able to donate.

We also have functionality that has never been fully activated and ideas that have yet to be tested. We wanted to take some of this further to a point where a new generation of volunteers could take it forward.

Late last year, we agreed to a program to meet the new challenges and continue to serve our growing readership.

There are two parts to the program.

We are keen to begin bringing new and younger volunteers into our teams but we recognize that some of the things we are happy to do to maintain the FIRE Project portals requires skills that not all potential new volunteers have and may require equipment that is different from equipment available to them . Therefore, part of the recent work has been aimed at trialling different types of software and this inevitably produces some differences in the way that information and news appears on our portals.

We appreciate the patience of our readers during this work.

The second part of the work was to look at the many types of hostile code that are in use on the Internet. The FIRE Project public access portals are only one part of the total system. The invisible part is well-protected from potential forms of attack, but the public access portals have deliberately been built with light protection in the interests of providing fast response times from the resources allocated for public access. At the same time, the public access portals have not required special access control mechnaisms to make reader access simple and easy. Unfortunately, the number of motives for attacking Internet assets have grown, particularly during the last five years, and now have strong commercial motivation. The number of volunteer hours required to remove hostile code, correct any damage resulting from these attacks, and keep our readers safe have absorbed a high proportion of available volunteer hours. Given that each volunteer is juggling donated time around busy day jobs and other personal commitments. It is necessary to attempt to reduce the load and allow volunteers to join the teams without having to be highly skilled system administrators.

We are now approaching the point where much of the work is concluding and we will be able to return to a familiar presentation of news and information.

Project Manager, FIRE Project

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