Pasha

B2224

It really doesn't seem like this is the fifteenth story in the Kydd and Renzi series and that the soft back edition is now available. For readers who have been greatly entertained by any, or all, of the previous fourteen stories, there is little a reviewer can say, other than to confirm that this is a worthy addition to the series and will provide as much pleasure and information as any of the preceding books. For those who have yet to read one of these stories, there is much to say without spoiling the many surprises in store for them in this gripping yarn. The publication of the soft back edition means two things to Kydd and Renzi fans. First, it means that those who prefer to wait for the soft back edition have had their patience rewarded and their numbers will swell with all the new readers who pick up the soft back at an airport, to be avid readers who will want to puy the preceding stories in the saga. Second, it means that we are only a few months away from seeing the sixteenth story appear as a hard back.

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NAME: Pasha
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 270914
FILE: R2247
AUTHOR: Julian Stockwin
PUBLISHER: Hodder & Stoughton
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 375
PRICE: £8.99
GENRE: Fiction
SUBJECT: Napoleonic Wars, Nineteenth Century, sailing frigates, wooden walls, Mediterranean, Eastern Mediterranean, Ottoman Turks, Sultan Selim III, Ottoman Empire
ISBN: 978-1-444-78541-8
IMAGE: B2247.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/k6yn2dp
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: It really doesn't seem like this is the fifteenth story in the Kydd and Renzi series and that the soft back edition is now available. For readers who have been greatly entertained by any, or all, of the previous fourteen stories, there is little a reviewer can say, other than to confirm that this is a worthy addition to the series and will provide as much pleasure and information as any of the preceding books. For those who have yet to read one of these stories, there is much to say without spoiling the many surprises in store for them in this gripping yarn. The publication of the soft back edition means two things to Kydd and Renzi fans. First, it means that those who prefer to wait for the soft back edition have had their patience rewarded and their numbers will swell with all the new readers who pick up the soft back at an airport, to be avid readers who will want to puy the preceding stories in the saga. Second, it means that we are only a few months away from seeing the sixteenth story appear as a hard back.

Stockwin and his wife Cathy form a very effective writing team, visiting the locations for each new story and conducting extensive research. One of the risks for any writer of fiction is that, after a few highly successful stories, it becomes difficult to avoid becoming stale or to avoid boredom with the characters that make the story. Having read each of the previous stories, this reviewer can say that each new story is as fresh and vibrant as a newly minted first publication. Although Kydd and Renzi revisit some old locations over a number of stories, the latest story always contains much new material against a novel plot line and the Stockwin team obviously enjoy the research phase for the next book. During the series, Stockwin has broken much new ground and carved for himself a position equal to any of the most popular writers of French Republic and Napoleonic Wars maritime fiction. That is a major achievement because there have been a number of outstanding authors writing in this genre. From time to time, Stockwin has been favourably compared to O'Brien, and there is some similarity in that both authors have used two characters as the primary heroes that are very different and complimentary. In O'Brien's case, there a captain who is a seaman and a doctor who does some spying, but that has only a superficial relationship to the Stockwin characters of a captain who is a seaman and an educated individual who does some covert work. Stockwin broke new ground by having a young Guilford wig-maker who was press ganged into the Royal Navy and therefore someone who had no experience or aspiration to make a life at sea. Once onboard a warship, the wig-maker, Kydd, develops a friendship with a mysterious figure, Renzi, who has volunteered to serve as a seaman but who is educated. From that first story, the characters evolve and each new book peels some more layers off the onion that is each character. Eventually the mysteries of Renzi are revealed and he develops a long distance relationship with Kydd's sister that seems fated never to be consummated.

In each story, Stockwin includes a piece of technology that is not well known. This forms one key element in that particular story and has a place in historic reality. This latest story contains one such item and the author's note includes mention that an example was presented to Britain and resides in a Royal Navy fort in the Portsmouth area.

This latest tale is as involving and absorbing as those that have gone before. It follows a series of highs and lows for the two main characters. In the process, it takes Kydd to a new elevation as it does for Renzi and for Kydd's sister. It also sets the ground work for the next story with a new career mapping out for Renzi and a new career stage for Kydd.

This new book is a stand-alone story in that it can be picked up and enjoyed without the reader needing to first read earlier stories. However, most readers will be motivated to buy earlier stories because of the enjoyment they have gained from this tale. This reviewer would recommend buying all of the previous books and starting from the first to be published, completing the process by rereading this new story. That probably means that the reader will have reread this book in time to buy the next story. That recommendation is based on the reviewer's own experience of coming in to the series at the forth book. In doing this, the reading experience moves to the next level because there is a further dimension added to the entertainment of each tale.

One of Stockwin's particular achievements is that he successfully broke the Trafalgar barrier that has defeated some other writer's of naval fiction. Nelson is such a powerful icon that his death in the moment of great victory marks for many the end of the story of the British sailing battleship and the war at sea during the Napoleonic Wars. The reality is very different. The French continued to send out individual ships and small squadrons. Battles were still fought around the world, and the British Empire was about to take off with a spurt of expansion that saw new strongholds in Africa and other locations, new colonies, major sea routes to police and frictions with older nations and Empires. It is just that historians have largely failed to tell the stories, concentrating on land warfare after 1805, taking the story of the British Empire from the late Victorian period and starting again with naval warfare from 1900.

Having taken Kydd and Renzi through the Trafalgar barrier, by the interesting device of having Kydd take his frigate into the battle as part of the frigate screen, there is now an almost untrodden opportunity for very fresh stories based on events that are now almost entirely forgotten. It will be very interesting to see if later stories take Kydd and Renzi on the course plotted by Admiral Cockrane to the South American revolutionary wars, the Anglo American War of 1812 and the Eastern Mediterranean again.

The latest tale is set in the Eastern Mediterranean and provides the basis for a return later in one of the stories that must follow.

A cracking read and well worth the time and money. This review is written for an English language Internet news and information resource, but the Kydd and Renzi saga is published in a growing number of languages with some major growth in readership from parts of the world where interest in nautical affairs may seem unlikely. The only downside of reading this new book is that there is the wait until the next story is published.

Short Sterling, 1939-48 (all Marks), Owner’s Workshop Manual

B2226

One of the great mysteries is why Great Britain has consistently failed to preserve some of the most important military artefacts from its long history of fighting successfully against great odds. An almost equal mystery is why Britain fails to record adequately events and technology from that history. The author is a commissioning editor and author with considerable experience in and enthusiasm for aviation history, especially in WWII bombing. He has written about one of the dual mysteries, the Short Stirling heavy bomber, the first of three battle-winning British heavy bomber aircraft. This book follows the well proven Haynes approach to workshop manuals with many fine illustrations in photographic material and drawings. There is a good history of the Sterling, together with views from pilot, engineer, restorer, and maintainer. The technology is presented in sections, anatomy, and engines. This book is highly recommended and no aviation enthusiast can afford to be without a copy.

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NAME: Short Sterling, 1939-48 (all Marks), Owner's Workshop Manual
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 140615
FILE: R2248
AUTHOR: Jonathan Falconer
PUBLISHER: Haynes
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 157
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, Second World War, RAF, Bomber Command, War in the Air, heavy bombers, technology, four engine aircraft, glider tug, troop carrier, air transport, paratroop dropping
ISBN: 978-0-85733-791-7
IMAGE: B2248.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/orvp2a7
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: One of the great mysteries is why Great Britain has consistently failed to preserve some of the most important military artefacts from its long history of fighting successfully against great odds. An almost equal mystery is why Britain fails to record adequately events and technology from that history. The author is a commissioning editor and author with considerable experience in and enthusiasm for aviation history, especially in WWII bombing. He has written about one of the dual mysteries, the Short Stirling heavy bomber, the first of three battle-winning British heavy bomber aircraft. This book follows the well proven Haynes approach to workshop manuals with many fine illustrations in photographic material and drawings. There is a good history of the Sterling, together with views from pilot, engineer, restorer, and maintainer. The technology is presented in sections, anatomy, and engines. This book is highly recommended and no aviation enthusiast can afford to be without a copy.

The mystery of British failure to preserve its outstanding military and military engineering history may never be answered. The nearest we get is to understand that the British have long been a tolerant people who queue in an orderly manner and may take pride in some of their military achievements, but have a tendency to wish to move forward into peace. The reasons why some important artefacts are not preserved is variable. At the end of wars, Britain has been quick, perhaps too quick, to turn swords into plough shears and some artefacts are brought back to life through the dedication of individuals and small groups of enthusiasts. In the case of the Short Sterling, no complete aircraft has survived. There are some fragments and a number of enthusiasts have been working towards recreating a complete aircraft by collecting surviving fragments and linking them with reconstructed facsimiles. There may never result in the restoration of a flying Sterling, although with the huge strides made in rebuilding other classic war birds it cannot be discounted completely. Somewhere, someone may be already planning the construction of a facsimile aircraft that is capable of flight, although this may be a look-alike rather than an exact recreation.

The Short Sterling was the first of the three famous RAF heavy bombers to enter service and it suffered two problems, being the first where there was no real experience of taking an aircraft of this size and complexity to war, and also suffering from the amount of completely new and advanced components that conspired to reduce reliability. The Handley Page Halifax followed the Sterling into service and shared the use of radial engines for most Halifaxes built. Like the Sterling, the Halifax almost disappeared but a number of near-complete non-flying aircraft have survived. It was to prove a dependable workhorse, but the real star was almost an accident but became the most famous bomber of all time, happily also continuing to fly with two Lancasters flying in Britain together in 2015 and the possibility of up to six more being returned to flying condition.

In service, the Sterling was liked by its crews in spite of its reliability record and the long climb up a rickety ladder into the aircraft. The Sterling was almost an essay in new components. This led to its downfall and rapid relegation to other duties. Britain was fortunate that it still had a diverse aircraft industry that was capable of great innovation and had the ability to provide two or three different aircraft for a particular RAF requirement. The delivery of Hurricane and Spitfire to meet the RAF requirement for a monoplane interceptor was to make victory possible, against theoretically overwhelming German odds, in the Battle of Britain. Had only one aircraft been available that victory would have been unlikely. The Hurricane employed much of the technology of its biplane predecessors but in the form of a fast low-wing monoplane with a heavy rifle calibre machine gun armament. It was more than a match for the German bombers and destroyed them in large numbers. It had the great advantage that its method of construction absorbed battle damage and was relatively easy to repair. The Spitfire was very different in its design and construction. That made it difficult to build and more difficult to repair, but it offered sparking performance, was able to more than compete with the German fighters and was capable of considerable further development, eventually developing into the Supermarine Attacker which was the first generation single-seat jet fighter to serve in the FAA from RN carriers.

Where the Hurricane proved faster to initially develop and enter RAF service, the Sterling risked its place in history because it was so advanced. The Halifax proved easier to build, reasonably reliable and equipped with radial engines that allowed the in-demand Merlin engines to go to the superlative Lancaster that had developed from the less than inspiring two engine Manchester bomber. Had the Halifax and Lancaster not become available, the Sterling might have received more attention to improve reliability and result in larger numbers being built. As it was, the Sterling was limited to 2,371 aircraft and reach a peak of 12 squadrons by 1943. It was then overtaken by the Halifax and even more dramatically by the Lancaster. That left a large number of aircraft that were still technically advanced and with a good performance. As a result, the Sterling was modified and used for Special Duties, flying arms and agents into Occupied Territory, serving as an assault glider tug, dropping paratroops and continuing on in RAF service until July 1946.

The Stirling made great use of hydraulic and electric control systems and this was a large part of the reliability issue. However, the design was based on modular construction and the engines were power eggs that used only four bolts for attachment. Apart from the distance of the nose from the ground, requiring gantries and platforms for engineering access, the Sterling was generally easy to work on. Engines could be detached as complete assemblies for servicing and many other components were equally easy to remove for maintenance.

As Britain raced to move from war to peace, the Sterling was one of many items of equipment that was rushed to the scrap yard with considerable efficiency. The author has concluded the story with an account of the work of enthusiasts to collect surviving fragments to restore and build into a more significant restoration. The project is aiming to reconstruct a forward section of fuselage. This may take some time, but there is a realistic prospect of achieving the goal. There have also been a number of other attempts to recreate a complete Stirling, possibly to flying condition. There are however significant challenges to returning a Sterling to the air, not least in achieving minimum reliability standards that would be accepted by an Aviation Authority. One possibility considered by a group of wealthy Americans is to produce a completely new aircraft that is externally a good reconstruction of a Sterling, but one that may be a scaled down version and fitted with modern internal equipment.

Battles of the Marne & the Aisne

D0195

This new DVD of First World War battles matches the very high standard achieved by BHTV in their military history series. It covers the fight back after the initial retreats. At this point the WWI campaign on the Western Front was still a war of movement where cavalry were still deployed on horseback and field artillery raced around the battlefield. It is perhaps the best example of British and French troops being deployed to mutual advantage with excellent communications between the commanders and with the respective strengths of commanders being used symbiotically. This is a stirring story, well told by the BHTV team.

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NAME: Battles of the Marne & the Aisne
CLASSIFICATION: Video, DVD, reviews
FILE: D0195
DATE: 010615
PRESENTER(S): Paul Oldfield, Ed Church, Mike Peters, Tim Saunders, Tom Dormer, Andrew Duff
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword Digital
MEDIA: DVD
FORMAT: Dual layer
RUNTIME: 90 minutes
PLAYERS: Linux Workstation, Personal Computer, Mac Computer, DVD Player
INTERNET:
PRICE: £9.99
GENRE: Non-Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, First World War, Great War,battles, BEF, German Army, French Army, Western Front, counter attack, end of retreat
ISBN: 0-24762-112-9
IMAGE: D0194
VIDEO:
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ngg4dd9
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This new DVD of First World War battles matches the very high standard achieved by BHTV in their military history series. It covers the fight back after the initial retreats. At this point the WWI campaign on the Western Front was still a war of movement where cavalry were still deployed on horseback and field artillery raced around the battlefield. It is perhaps the best example of British and French troops being deployed to mutual advantage with excellent communications between the commanders and with the respective strengths of commanders being used symbiotically. This is a stirring story, well told by the BHTV team.

The abiding image of WWI is of terrifying trench warfare, filth, blood and the destruction of a generation of young men on both sides. After the battles of the Marne and the Aine, this is reasonably accurate until the tank began to break the stalemate of the trenches. Initially, the German Schlieffen Plan had appeared to work and the Germans were contemptuous of the little British Army. German troops swung through neutral Belgium and northern France, approaching Paris and the expected swift victory before the Russians could mount a significant attack on the second front. However, the wheel to the south by von Kluck's and von Bulow's armies had exposed their flank to the east of Paris and they were vulnerable to a counter attack. The sweep through France had also failed to match the expected timetable. The small British Army had proved much tougher than the Germans had anticipated and slowed down the German advance, while enabling British and French forces to fall back in good order and in valiant rear guard actions. The one thing that the Schlieffen could not afford was any departure from the timetable. The German Army had to defeat the British and French rapidly, to free up the troops desperately needed to fight the Russians on the Eastern Front. Germany could not afford a war on two fronts or a lengthy war.

The British Expeditionary Force was small but its troops were well trained with a mixture of the small regular standing Army and the Territorial volunteers, their numbers swelling with new volunteers. Morale was good and the Quick Firing field artillery and the well drilled riflemen were impressive. To these strong points was added the ability of junior commanders to think for themselves when communications with Staff were disrupted by the speed of movement. The result was that the Germans often thought they were facing the full BEF rather than individual units, well-led by junior commanders and where the rate of fire by well drilled riflemen often gave the impression of machine guns. BEF troops not only fell back in good order to reconnect with neighbouring units, but they did so fiercely, giving a good account of themselves, when the Germans had expected to start a chaotic route.

French units were also putting up a stiff resistance and maintaining their structure. However, this might have come to nothing had the senior commanders not managed to communicate effectively. Much of this communications was down to the services of a relatively elderly British Second Lieutenant who was assigned to act as liaison between Haig, French and their French opposite numbers. This is one key fact that has received little recognition. It is very easy to overlook the fact that British and French soldiers had no prior experience, with the experience of the Crimean War being the one, and long forgotten, exception, of fighting alongside each other. Rather, there had been centuries of enmity. Not only was there a long history of fighting each other, there were cultural differences, different attitudes to how land forces should operate, and two very different languages. This potentially provided every opportunity for disaster. That the British and French commanders worked so effectively together was a major achievement for all concerned.

The BEF commanders were cautious and had been considering a further fighting withdrawal to the south to re-equip, draw breath and then decide how to fight on. The French set great store in elan and the war of movement. Against all the odds they worked together and appreciated the German weakness. Marshal Joffre with formidable military diplomacy persuaded Field Marshal Sir John French to join with the French armies in an attack back across the Marne. The exhausted British rallied and filled the gap between two French forces in the Battle of the Marne in what was to be a stunning victory which to many seemed a miracle. They had halted and thrown back the German advance, but lacked the capacity to move forward fast enough to turn the victory of the Marne into a significant defeat of the German Armies. This allowed the Germans to stop beyond the River Aisne, reinforce and dig in. The result was that the British had to make a frontal attack across open country and feel the full impact of modern defensive firepower that they had used so successfully to blunt the initial German invasion of Belgium and northern France.

Unable to continue driving the Germans back, the bloodied and battered BEF was ordered by Sir John French to dig in. This marked the end of the war of movement and the beginning of the long years of bitter trench warfare. Once both forces had stopped and begun to dig defensive positions, the new war was one of stronger defences and new ways of attacking the enemy trenches, giving birth to a bloody twin approach of mining and counter mining below ground and a horribly costly series of attacks Over The Top across the mud and barbed wire of No Man's Land.

So much has been written and lamented about the trench war, and so little about the BEF's fighting withdrawal and courageous fight back to the Aisne, that it is very easy to miss the huge contribution made to eventual victory by the rearguard actions at Mons, and Le Cateau and the fightback to the Aisne. Those actions may have ended in bitter trench war with its terrible price, but they also ensured that German could not win and would eventually be forced to surrender. They were perhaps a delayed victory, but they were also a defeat of German war aims because the German invaders could not afford to fail to win a quick Western Front victory. The best they could then hope for was a delayed defeat.

All of this is ably set out by a video production team of historians and battle field guides, with colour added by re-enactment enthusiasts. The maps are clear and instructive, the presentation is enthusiastic and assured, with the interaction between the team of specialists keeping the pace going at the correct rate. There is also the important assistance that comes from former soldiers with an eye for the terrain which shapes the progress and outcome of land battles. Another splendid DVD from BHTV

Take a Stand to Stop Government Spying

TPPLOGO

Yesterday, Rand Paul stood on the Senate floor for nearly 12 hours to bring light to the government's bulk collection of private information of American citizens. He was joined by several Senators from both sides of the aisle.

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We've demonstrated our willingness to work with unlikely alliances this week because this issue really is one of us vs. the government.

Today we learned that Mitch McConnell has planned votes to end debate on the issue on Saturday. His goal would be for the government to continue spying on American citizens and unless we do something, he will succeed!

We need to target the following Senators and tell them that the American people are sick and tired of their government treating them like criminals who have already committed a crime. Tell them to stop this unwarranted spying. We must make a stand between now and Saturday to make sure they listen to their constituents. Call now!

Senator State Phone
James Lankford OK (202) 224-5754
Cory Gardner CO (202) 224-5941
John Hoeven ND (202) 224-2551
David Perdue GA (202) 224-3521
Jeff Flake AZ (202) 224-4521
David Vitter LA (202) 224-4623
Bill Cassidy LA (202) 224-5824
Pat Toomey PA (202) 224-4254
Mike Crapo ID (202) 224-6142
Mike Enzi WY (202) 224-3424
Jerry Moran KS (202) 224-6521
Daniel Sullivan AK (202) 224-3004
Shelley Moore Capito WV (202) 224-6472
Ron Johnson WI (202) 224-5323
Rob Portman OH (202) 224-3353

Time is of the essence if we want to stop this. Please make your voices heard today!

In liberty,
Tea Party Patriots Support Team

Fighting the Great War at Sea, Strategy, Tactics and Technology

B2183

In reviewing books, there is sometimes a touch of despair. The cost of production, including the royalties to photographers and photo libraries frequently constrains authors and publishers. This new book is an example of an author and publisher who have refused to compromise and consequently produced a book which is outstanding in a field of good books. The downside is that there will be potential readers who would struggle to justify the cover price, even though it is an aggressive price for a book of this quality and a testament to the management of production in driving down costs without reducing the book's quality. The publisher does run some amazing promotions and this is a book that must feature in those programs, opening it to a wider readership. The publisher has also been developing an extensive range of eBooks, into which this must eventually be added. However, those readers who can stretch to the cover price will be richly rewarded.

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NAME: Fighting the Great War at Sea, Strategy, Tactics and Technology
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2183
AUTHOR: Norman Friedman
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 416
PRICE: £45.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, war at sea, tactics, naval architecture, naval engineering, strategy, technology, warships, Royal Navy
ISBN: 978-1-84832-216-5
IMAGE: B2182.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/o266cqa
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: In reviewing books, there is sometimes a touch of despair. The cost of production, including the royalties to photographers and photo libraries frequently constrains authors and publishers. This new book is an example of an author and publisher who have refused to compromise and consequently produced a book which is outstanding in a field of good books. The downside is that there will be potential readers who would struggle to justify the cover price, even though it is an aggressive price for a book of this quality and a testament to the management of production in driving down costs without reducing the book's quality. The publisher does run some amazing promotions and this is a book that must feature in those programs, opening it to a wider readership. The publisher has also been developing an extensive range of eBooks, into which this must eventually be added. However, those readers who can stretch to the cover price will be richly rewarded.

WWI was a naval war of revolution. The numbers of new ship and aircraft types, and the introduction of radio communication, required major changes in tactics and permitted new strategies. The technology was often demanding, but the opportunities for navies that could meet the challenges was great.

From the start of WWI, the Royal Navy was able to launch the new locomotive torpedoes from major warships, fast torpedo boats, submarines and aircraft, the RNAS having successfully conducted the first drop of a torpedo from an aircraft four weeks before the start of WWI. The ability to launch torpedoes from all of these very different types of vehicle gave the RN many advantages, but the enemy was also able to field the torpedo, particularly from U-boats.

Naval aviation was very new but the RN was already adding carriers to its fleet and this was eventually to provide the option to launch pre-emptive strikes against enemy ships in port, using large numbers of aircraft equipped with bombs and torpedoes, launched from carriers cruising off the enemy coastline. Before the end of WWI, the RN not only had a growing fleet of aircraft-carrying vessels, including lighters towed behind fast destroyers, but had built fighter carrying airships and vessels designed from the start to carry naval aircraft into battle.

Communications were revolutionized by radio. For the first time, the Admiralty could communicate with ships and squadrons around the world. For the first time, a warship could sail on a mission without becoming blind to critical events that were known to the Admiralty. Communication was also possible between ships and naval aircraft. The world had shrunk dramatically. This ability to communicate enable the RN to also direction find enemy ships from their radio transmissions and accurately forecast some enemy actions from changes in radio traffic. This rapidly led into a contest between those producing encryption systems and those breaking them.

Against the static war of attrition on land, particularly on the Western Front, naval warfare was amazingly fast and flexible. For the first time it was truly global with actions in all oceans and most seas, including inland waters. Warships were carried in kit form and assembled on the shore of African lakes. German raiders sought refuge in rivers and were hunted by aircraft. Submarines preyed on convoys of merchant ships and the RN used large numbers of airships to shadow convoys, detecting and sinking German submarines. Some airship crews were airborne for days in a range of weather.

There were just so many 'firsts' in the war at sea and the RN managed to rise to the challenges across all of the new areas. The result is that this new book is encyclopedic. There is extensive text and a great many photographs and drawings. In a single book, it would be very hard to match the comprehensive coverage of this work. There will be areas were books of much narrower scope will be able to compete and offer more detailed insights. The nature of history also means that there will be some assertions that will be challenged, although not necessarily with success.

If there is criticism, it could be in the font size used throughout. It is entirely understandable that a publisher would use a smaller font size to avoid even more pages, increasing production cost. It is a size used in many books with less justification and it should not present a problem for most readers. The publisher is to be commended for committing resource to such a fine work that will become one of the key reference works for the naval warfare of WWI. The author has undertaken a considerable work and brought it to successful conclusion after an epic period of research

A Shipyard At War, Unseen Photographs from John Brown’s Clydebank 1914-1918

B2182

For a book of this quality and level of unique illustration, it is already at an aggressive price, although it may be beyond the pocket of many who would love to read it. Fortunately Pen & Sword is famous for its special offers and there are still lending libraries that will stock copies. For anyone with an interest in the sea, ships, shipbuilding and WWI, this is a book that must not be missed. Outstanding!!!

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NAME: A Shipyard At War, Unseen Photographs from John Brown's Clydebank 1914-1918
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2182
AUTHOR: Ian Johnston
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 192
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, war at sea, shipyard at war, naval architecture, naval engineering, Clyde, John Brown, Liners, passenger ships, Scottish shipbuilding
ISBN: 978-1-84832-216-5
IMAGE: B2182.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/o266cqa
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author was brought up in a shipbuilding family and his books always convey his pride in and love of the Clyde shipyards. Anyone who has read the author's work before will need no recommendation to this work. It fits neatly into the story told in other best selling books from the author and this new work brings out the story of how John Brown's Clydebank played a very important role in the naval campaigns of WWI. The text is concise and fully supports the outstanding collection of rare photographs. This is not a coffee table photo essay, but a book of substance that is lavishly illustrated to tell the rich story of the ships and men that immortalize Clydebank at war.

The end papers carry side views of the range of ships constructed, maintained and updated on Clydebank. They range from the liner Aquitania to the iconic and tragic HMS Hood, with warships of all the intermediate sizes.

For a book of this quality and level of unique illustration, it is already at an aggressive price, although it may be beyond the pocket of many who would love to read it. Fortunately Pen & Sword is famous for its special offers and there are still lending libraries that will stock copies. For anyone with an interest in the sea, ships, shipbuilding and WWI, this is a book that must not be missed. Outstanding!!!

Liaison 1914, a Narrative of the Great Retreat

B2181

This is a substantial work, fluently written and well-supported by maps and very strong photo plate section. The foreword by Winston Churchill, who became a life long friend of the author, sets the context of the work. This is one book of WWI that no enthusiast can afford to be without, also a firm foundation for historians.

There are so many lessons in this book that it should become essential reading for school children in Britain and France. It also provides a foundation for understanding the land war through to victory in 1918. To highly commend this work is barely adequate to its value.

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NAME: Liaison 1914, a Narrative of the Great Retreat
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2181
AUTHOR: Edward Spears
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 588
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, Western Front, the retreat, Royal Irish Hussars, Mons, Marne, Churchill
ISBN: 1-47382-746-9
IMAGE: B2181.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/m7mn2dt
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a substantial work, fluently written and well-supported by maps and very strong photo plate section. The foreword by Winston Churchill, who became a life long friend of the author, sets the context of the work. This is one book of WWI that no enthusiast can afford to be without, also a firm foundation for historians.

The author was of junior rank in 1914 but, as a fluent French speaker, he was to become a vital link between the British and the French at the most critical stage of WWI. He was to become the point between success and failure and he performed superbly, being highly decorated by both the British and the French.

The senior British commanders tended to the cautious and their field commanders proved brilliant rear guards, fighting a numerically superior German invasion with a dogged determination that should make Britons then and now proud of their achievements. The French had a huge investment in 'elan' and this made them impetuous and fast to change positions. Linking the two armies by reliable communication maximised the potential of both and acted to reduce or avoid some of the matching weaknesses.

As that reliable communication, the author enjoyed a unique perspective of the BEF and their French allies and ensured that the BEF knew exactly where the French would be and where they intended to move. The French were able to encourage the British commander Sir John French as he ordered his force to fall back in order and then to take the centre between two French Armies to land a telling blow on the Germans and force them back to the Belgian border.

This is an incredible book that has unique authority. There was some controversy about the author during the events, but his decoration by France and Britain demonstrates the regard in which he was held and of the appreciation of his unusual contribution. As a 28 year old subaltern, the author not only held the most junior commissioned rank but was old for that rank. He spoke his mind before very senior officers and his dual fluency in English and French ensured that both sets of commanders clearly understood each other. Considering that neither army had been able to exercise together and that the alliance of Britain and France was in itself novel, the potential for misunderstanding was enormous. It is incredible but true that a very junior officer not only conveyed accurate information between the commanders, but that his forthright manner contributed to the decisions in a most unusual but supportive way.

There are so many lessons in this book that it should become essential reading for school children in Britain and France. It also provides a foundation for understanding the land war through to victory in 1918. To highly commend this work is barely adequate to its value.

A French Soldier’s War Diary 1914-1918

B2180

Very little has been published in the English language about the French experiences in the Great War. This is a great shame because the BEF and the French divisions fought closely together and it was their co-operation that avoided early defeat and won eventual victory. This book is an account by a French officer that was first published in French in 1971. A flowing translation has brought this fascinating story to English language readers.

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NAME: A French Soldier's War Diary 1914-1918
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2180
AUTHOR: Henri Desagneaux, Edited, Jean Desagneaux
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 112
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, Western Front, trench warfare, no-man's-land, mining, static war, war of attrition, over the top
ISBN: 1-47382-298-X
IMAGE: B2180.jpg
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DESCRIPTION: Very little has been published in the English language about the French experiences in the Great War. This is a great shame because the BEF and the French divisions fought closely together and it was their co-operation that avoided early defeat and won eventual victory. This book is an account by a French officer that was first published in French in 1971. A flowing translation has brought this fascinating story to English language readers.

The writer was trained as a lawyer who was mobilized as a reserve, reached the rank of major and was decorated for his bravery. It is interesting to compare his experiences with those accounts by and of British officers of the same period. After the war the writer returned to local government, remobilizing as a major in 1940. He died in 1969 and his diary was saved through its publication in French in 1971. Happily, a number of similar documents that were written, but never published, then published after the death of the writer decades later by family members have also survived and become public information.

1914, They Were There!, Memories of the Great War 1914-1918 by Those Who Experienced It

B2179

With so many books being released as part of the centenary celebrations, and with most of them achieving a high standard, it can be very difficult for a reader to select to suit his or her tastes and interests. This book stands out because it has a fine selection of images and sharp text that presents a series of snapshots across the full range of the war in Europe. It is ideal for those readers who know little of the Great War because it is a great introduction. It is also valuable book for the enthusiast and the knowledgable because its scope covers all of the aspects of the Great War that might have been missed.

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NAME: 1914, They Were There!, Memories of the Great War 1914-1918 by Those Who Experienced It
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2179
AUTHOR: Edited, William Langford
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 272
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, Western Front, trench warfare, no-man's-land, mining, static war, war of attrition, over the top, armoured trains.
ISBN: 1-78383-105-7
IMAGE: B2179.jpg
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DESCRIPTION: This is a rework of a magazine, 'I Was There', that was published in September 1938 at the height of the failed Anglo-French policy of appeasing Hitler. It vividly brought before the public the stories of those who had fought and suffered and triumphed in the Great War. These were stories that had been told in 1918 and been allowed to dim through a peacetime desire to forget about the sorrow and pay almost any price to avoid a repeat.

This book provides a comprehensive view of the actions and is heavily illustrated with a fine collection of images through the body of the book. It includes some of the less well recognized aspects of the Great War, An example is the operation by the Naval Division of an armoured train in defence of Antwerp.

With so many books being released as part of the centenary celebrations, and with most of them achieving a high standard, it can be very difficult for a reader to select to suit his or her tastes and interests. This book stands out because it has a fine selection of images and sharp text that presents a series of snapshots across the full range of the war in Europe. It is ideal for those readers who know little of the Great War because it is a great introduction. It is also valuable book for the enthusiast and the knowledgable because its scope covers all of the aspects of the Great War that might have been missed.

A Story of the Great War, Before Action, William Noel Hodgson and the 9th Devons

B2178

The author has established a formidable catalogue of books and contributions to radio and television, with a special interest in the Great War. In this new book, she draws on the writings and unpublished letters of Hodgson, who has been best remembered for his poetry. This has enabled a recreation of a volunteer battalion and its commitment to violent battle at Loos, where Hodgson won the Military Cross. This is a moving story and encapsulates life in the BEF on the Western Front.


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NAME: A Story of the Great War, Before Action, William Noel Hodgson and the 9th Devons
DATE: 180315
FILE: R2178
AUTHOR: Charlotte Zeepvat
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 237
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, 1914-1918, Western Front, trench warfare, no-man's-land, mining, static war, war of attrition, over the top.
ISBN: 1-78159-375-9
IMAGE: B2178.jpg
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DESCRIPTION: The author has established a formidable catalogue of books and contributions to radio and television, with a special interest in the Great War. In this new book, she draws on the writings and unpublished letters of Hodgson, who has been best remembered for his poetry. This has enabled a recreation of a volunteer battalion and its commitment to violent battle at Loos, where Hodgson won the Military Cross. This is a moving story and encapsulates life in the BEF on the Western Front.

The author has been able to present a well rounded picture of life for the volunteers, family and friendships. The photo plate section provides a view of life before the conflict, and life and death during it. Some will find this a particularly emotional view of people and events that are now beyond living memory.

The Devonshires are a vivid example of the most bestial events of WWI. In a morning, half their strength was destroyed. The survivors would never be the same again. For a military unit that drew its volunteers from a relatively small area, the survivors were not just fellow soldiers with the casualties, but friends before the war began. Their loss had great impact at home and some of the best of a generation were slaughtered on the Western Front.