Book Review – Kampfgruppe Peiper, The Race For The Meuse

B2054

READ THE FULL REVIEW

The authors have done a first rate job of using contemporary accounts to tell a fasted paced story, supported by a wealth of clear maps and strong illustrations. There is also a very good introduction with a description of the weapons available to both sides. If this is the only book you can buy of the Battle of the Bulge, this is the one to go for. Highly commended.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

Kampfgruppe Peiper, The Race For The Meuse

B2054

The authors have done a first rate job of using contemporary accounts to tell a fasted paced story, supported by a wealth of clear maps and strong illustrations. There is also a very good introduction with a description of the weapons available to both sides. If this is the only book you can buy of the Battle of the Bulge, this is the one to go for. Highly commended.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Kampfgruppe Peiper, The Race For The Meuse
DATE: 191014
FILE: R2054
AUTHOR: David Cooke, Wayne Evans
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 192
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, Second World War, World War Two, D-Day, Panzer Armies, PkwIV, Panther, SS Panzers, Tiger, King Tiger, elite forces, armoured battle group, bridges, Allied advance, defence of Germany, Battle of the Bulge, Ardennes Offensive, Special Forces, Sherman tanks
ISBN: 1-47382-704-3
IMAGE: B2054.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ldzx2sk
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Allied invasion of Normandy was a huge operation never before attempted on that scale. It was also benefiting from a set of brilliant deception plans that kept the Germans guessing and still believing that the main thrust was to be at Calais. The result was that Allied forces managed to break out of their beach heads and then begin the advance towards Germany. Given the resources available to the Allies, and the ingenious technical solutions developed to support an enormous amphibious landing operation, the Germans had lost the war the moment that the Allies broke out and began their advance. However, the German soldiers continued to fight on and some units achieved local successes, but they were remorselessly forced back towards Germany. As the Allies advanced they were constantly under pressure in logistics supply, making Antwerp a vital port to build supplies for the final advance into Germany.

Kampfgruppe Peiper was deployed to take the Meuse Bridges and Antwerp, to deny the Allies the use of Antwerp to supply their forward units as they raced into Holland and Germany. To achieve the objectives, Peiper had to take his heavy tanks through the Ardennes on roads suitable for cars and light trucks, crossing numerous streams on the way.

Kampfgruppe Peiper was typical of the Waffen SS. Equipped well, and ruthlessly led, they achieved objectives, often by means of very heavy casualties that would be avoided by other German units. They were also prepared to butcher prisoners to conserve their resources. The Battle of the Bulge came as an unpleasant surprise for the Allies, at a time when weather conditions prevented the tactical air force close support that had made life impossible for German formations. Hitler was throwing everything he had left into one desperate gamble. However, US engineers managed to blow the bridges and their infantry and artillery recovered to fight back. Then the weather improved and the tactical air force was back in business, blitzing any German units that moved. During the battle, Peiper followed type and ordered war crimes.

Peiper was part of the Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler that had been responsible for many war crimes on the Eastern Front. He led a powerful armoured fighting gruppe that was equipped with Panther, Tiger and Royal Tiger AFVs. These were formidable tanks in one on one contests with Allied Shermans. The Sherman's great strength was that it was a balanced design, armour:mobility;firepower, and it was available in considerable numbers. The German tanks had a number of weaknesses, particularly in cross country mobility and survivability against close support rocket and canon-armed fighter aircraft like the Hawker Typhoon. They were also very thirsty and the Germans hoped to seize fuel from over-run Allied positions. As long as Peiper was free of fighter attack and could keep moving, he stood a reasonable chance of punching through the Allied lines, but it is highly debatable that the Germans had the resources to follow up in support of his strike force. As it was, Peiper moved from tenuous advantage to the point where his gruppe was fighting for its life against Allied counter attack and losing.

Constant Vigilance, The RAF Regiment in the Burma Campaign

B2053

The author has brought to life the Forgotten Regiment, of the Forgotten Army, of the Forgotten War. Although historians are beginning to bring out the stories of the Burma campaigns, there is still so much to cover and to correct the news neglect of the campaigns at the time that they were taking place. This is therefore a very welcome new book and a fitting memorial to those who served in the RAF Regiment in the Far East.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Constant Vigilance, The RAF Regiment in the Burma Campaign
DATE: 191014
FILE: R2053
AUTHOR: Nigel W M Warwick
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 302
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, Second World War, World War Two, Far East, Forgotten Army, Forgotten Air Force, Forgotten War, Burma, India, Japanese, Sout-East Asia Command
ISBN: 1-47382-284-X
IMAGE: B2053.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nsgzutm
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author has brought to life the Forgotten Regiment, of the Forgotten Army, of the Forgotten War. Although historians are beginning to bring out the stories of the Burma campaigns, there is still so much to cover and to correct the news neglect of the campaigns at the time that they were taking place. This is therefore a very welcome new book and a fitting memorial to those who served in the RAF Regiment in the Far East.

It was perhaps natural that British news coverage of the Far East campaigns was so muted. The reverses in the outposts of Empire were painful at the time and there was so much to cover on the domestic doorstep. The Far East was just so far away.

The RAF Regiment was established to defend RAF airfields. That meant that it had to be trained and equipped as any infantry regiment in the British Army and also trained and equipped as an anti-aircraft artillery force to tackle threats from the ground and from the air. However, it was confined in its movement. Any Army regiment needed to advance and retreat while engaging an enemy force. Rear guards would buy time for the main force in a retreat, but the Army was expected to engage and advance, or provide a static shield. The RAF Regiment arrived at an airfield and was then expected to hold that position and protect aviation assets against air and ground attack, including small determined raids by Special Forces. Even advanced airfields were generally some way behind the front line. That became more complex in Burma because of the nature of fighting and local conditions.

By the start of WWII, aviation had come of age and formed a valuable and vital part of the combined arms deployed against the enemy. That was even more true in Burma because large Special Forces groups operated far behind the Japanese lines and could only survive and succeed with significant air support in the form of supply drops, glider and paratroop forces, air observation, and close air support. The RAF regiment was therefore a small, and under-equipped, force that performed a vital role in ensuring aviation assets survived and operated at optimum level.

The author has made use of personal records and accounts from RAF Regiment personnel. The text is strongly supported by maps, diagrams and photographs, many not previously published. This book is strongly recommended.

Retreat and Rearguard Somme 1918, The Fifth Army Retreat

B2052

The Centenary of the start of WWI has not surprisingly produced a large volume of books that rake through every conceivable aspect of this historic conflict. For the reviewer, battle fatigue can set in early on, but this centenary has produced some fine books, reprints of valuable insights that had faded from libraries, and a number of fresh insights. The epic scale of the conflict means that there are yet more insights to emerge as we move towards the rash of books that will be published for the Centenary of the End of the Great War. This book sits firmly in the upper reaches of those so far published. The author has researched well and this volume is worthy addition to his catalogue of WWI accounts.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Retreat and Rearguard Somme 1918, The Fifth Army Retreat
DATE: 191014
FILE: R2052
AUTHOR: Jerry Murland
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 254
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, First World War, World War One, 1918, German Army, Somme, Western Front, The Great War, German Spring Offensive.
ISBN: 1-78158-267-5
IMAGE: B2052.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/pk3jx8r
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Centenary of the start of WWI has not surprisingly produced a large volume of books that rake through every conceivable aspect of this historic conflict. For the reviewer, battle fatigue can set in early on, but this centenary has produced some fine books, reprints of valuable insights that had faded from libraries, and a number of fresh insights. The epic scale of the conflict means that there are yet more insights to emerge as we move towards the rash of books that will be published for the Centenary of the End of the Great War. This book sits firmly in the upper reaches of those so far published. The author has researched well and this volume is worthy addition to his catalogue of WWI accounts.

The author has painted a vivid picture of the actions on the Somme in 1918. He has brought out the unit and individual courage, the terrible conditions, and given graphic detail of the British, Irish and South African regiments. He demonstrates that so much has yet to emerge from this Great War, even one hundred years on.

The book is a valuable companion for battlefield visitors and, if anything, battlefield visits not only continue to be popular, but are increasing in popularity.

There will continue to be many conflicting views about particular elements of the war and this period of the German Spring Offensive may well be one of the most contentious.

After the lengthy stalemate on the Western Front, the Allies had been steadily gaining the upper hand. Then, the Russian Revolution changed everything, freeing up the German forces on the Eastern Front. It made possible the German Spring Offensive of 1918.

There have been claims that the US finally rode to the rescue, but the reality was probably that green US troops partly balanced the experienced but ill-led and ill-equipped, Russian troops, who were no longer fighting the Germans. The German Army preformed a major movement of troops in bringing such a large force across Germany from East to West.

However, the Allies were able to roll with the punch and then move back onto the offensive, leading to the German surrender only a few months later. The fighting retreat on the Somme bought time for the Allies to reform and re-supply to go back onto the offensive, and it also wore down the German soldiers. The author has captured this very well and the text is supported by maps and a photoplate section.

Hitler’s Last Witness, The Memoirs of Hitler’s Bodyguard

B2051

Misch has provided some interesting detail and observation, together with an assessment of others in Hitler's 'court' This is a book that was worth writing and, when compared to the many other books about Hitler and his way of life, adds to the pool of knowledge. The style is easy to read and there are two photoplate sections.

reviews.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Hitler's Last Witness, The Memoirs of Hitler's Bodyguard
DATE: 191014
FILE: R2051
AUTHOR: Rochus Misch
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 254
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Hitler, Third Reich, WWII, Second World War, World War Two, assault on Berlin, defeat, German Army, SS, bodyguards, close protection.
ISBN: 978-1-84832-749-8
IMAGE: B2051.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/o8ekwqa
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author was seriously wounded in the Polish invasion in 1939, but invited to join Hitler's close protection squad. He may therefore have been one of the last to see Hitler alive, but he was with him for much of the war. The title may suggest that the book is only about the final days in the Berlin bunker, but the author was in close attendance in all of the locations used by Hitler through the war. This provides a unique perspective, some new detail and an appreciation of how Hitler was to eventually fall.

Hitler was surrounded by an extraordinary 'court' where he was immensely loyal to some of his most junior servants, but played off his senior courtiers against each other. The author has been described as an insignificant individual who was privy to significant events. That is hardly a fair assessment Misch may have held junior SS rank but the power of the SS in Germany was such that he enjoyed more power and prestige than his rank suggested. He was not just a bodyguard, but also served Hitler as a courier and representative. His unquestioning loyalty was reciprocated.

Misch has provided some interesting detail and observation, together with an assessment of others in Hitler's 'court' This is a book that was worth writing and, when compared to the many other books about Hitler and his way of life, adds to the pool of knowledge. The style is easy to read and there are two photoplate sections.

NASA Rover Finds Active, Ancient Organic Chemistry on Mars

Curiosity-14-330a 0

This image illustrates possible ways methane might be added to Mars' atmosphere (sources) and removed from the atmosphere (sinks). NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has detected fluctuations in methane concentration in the atmosphere, implying both types of activity occur on modern Mars.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SAM-GSFC/Univ. of Michigan

NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has measured a tenfold spike in methane, an organic chemical, in the atmosphere around it and detected other organic molecules in a rock-powder sample collected by the robotic laboratory’s drill.

adn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

Curiosity-14-330b

Curiosity drilled into this rock target, "Cumberland"
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity drilled into this rock target, "Cumberland," during the 279th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (May 19, 2013) and collected a powdered sample of material from the rock's interior.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity-pia19086 webster-1

This graphic shows the Tunable Laser Spectrometer, one of the tools within the Sample Analysis at Mars laboratory on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover. By measuring absorption of light at specific wavelengths, it measures concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide and water vapor in Mars' atmosphere.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity-pia19087 webster-2

This graphic shows tenfold spiking in the abundance of methane in the Martian atmosphere surrounding NASA's Curiosity Mars rover, as detected by a series of measurements made with the Tunable Laser Spectrometer instrument in the rover's Sample Analysis at Mars laboratory suite.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity-pia19089 summons2

Data graphed here are examples from the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) laboratory's detection of Martian organics in a sample of powder that the drill on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover collected from a rock target called "Cumberland."
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


Curiosity-pia19090 summons3

This graphic offers comparisons between the amount of an organic chemical named chlorobenzene detected in the "Cumberland" rock sample and amounts of it in samples from three other Martian surface targets analyzed by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity-pia19091 summons4


This illustration portrays some of the reasons why finding organic chemicals on Mars is challenging. Whatever organic chemicals may be produced on Mars or delivered to Mars face several possible modes of being transformed or destroyed.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

"This temporary increase in methane -- sharply up and then back down -- tells us there must be some relatively localized source," said Sushil Atreya of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Curiosity rover science team. "There are many possible sources, biological or non-biological, such as interaction of water and rock."

Researchers used Curiosity’s onboard Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) laboratory a dozen times in a 20-month period to sniff methane in the atmosphere. During two of those months, in late 2013 and early 2014, four measurements averaged seven parts per billion. Before and after that, readings averaged only one-tenth that level.

Curiosity also detected different Martian organic chemicals in powder drilled from a rock dubbed Cumberland, the first definitive detection of organics in surface materials of Mars. These Martian organics could either have formed on Mars or been delivered to Mars by meteorites.

Organic molecules, which contain carbon and usually hydrogen, are chemical building blocks of life, although they can exist without the presence of life. Curiosity's findings from analyzing samples of atmosphere and rock powder do not reveal whether Mars has ever harbored living microbes, but the findings do shed light on a chemically active modern Mars and on favorable conditions for life on ancient Mars.

"We will keep working on the puzzles these findings present," said John Grotzinger, Curiosity project scientist of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena (Caltech). "Can we learn more about the active chemistry causing such fluctuations in the amount of methane in the atmosphere? Can we choose rock targets where identifiable organics have been preserved?"

Researchers worked many months to determine whether any of the organic material detected in the Cumberland sample was truly Martian. Curiosity’s SAM lab detected in several samples some organic carbon compounds that were, in fact, transported from Earth inside the rover. However, extensive testing and analysis yielded confidence in the detection of Martian organics.

Identifying which specific Martian organics are in the rock is complicated by the presence of perchlorate minerals in Martian rocks and soils. When heated inside SAM, the perchlorates alter the structures of the organic compounds, so the identities of the Martian organics in the rock remain uncertain.

"This first confirmation of organic carbon in a rock on Mars holds much promise," said Curiosity participating scientist Roger Summons of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. "Organics are important because they can tell us about the chemical pathways by which they were formed and preserved. In turn, this is informative about Earth-Mars differences and whether or not particular environments represented by Gale Crater sedimentary rocks were more or less favorable for accumulation of organic materials. The challenge now is to find other rocks on Mount Sharp that might have different and more extensive inventories of organic compounds."

Researchers also reported that Curiosity's taste of Martian water, bound into lakebed minerals in the Cumberland rock more than three billion years ago, indicates the planet lost much of its water before that lakebed formed and continued to lose large amounts after.

SAM analyzed hydrogen isotopes from water molecules that had been locked inside a rock sample for billions of years and were freed when SAM heated it, yielding information about the history of Martian water. The ratio of a heavier hydrogen isotope, deuterium, to the most common hydrogen isotope can provide a signature for comparison across different stages of a planet's history.

"It's really interesting that our measurements from Curiosity of gases extracted from ancient rocks can tell us about loss of water from Mars," said Paul Mahaffy, SAM principal investigator of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and lead author of a report published online this week by the journal Science

The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen has changed because the lighter hydrogen escapes from the upper atmosphere of Mars much more readily than heavier deuterium. In order to go back in time and see how the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio in Martian water changed over time, researchers can look at the ratio in water in the current atmosphere and water trapped in rocks at different times in the planet’s history.

Martian meteorites found on Earth also provide some information, but this record has gaps. No known Martian meteorites are even close to the same age as the rock studied on Mars, which formed about 3.9 billion to 4.6 billion years ago, according to Curiosity’s measurements.

The ratio that Curiosity found in the Cumberland sample is about one-half the ratio in water vapor in today's Martian atmosphere, suggesting much of the planet's water loss occurred since that rock formed. However, the measured ratio is about three times higher than the ratio in the original water supply of Mars, based on assumption that supply had a ratio similar to that measured in Earth's oceans. This suggests much of Mars' original water was lost before the rock formed.

Curiosity is one element of NASA's ongoing Mars research and preparation for a human mission to Mars in the 2030s. Caltech manages the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and JPL manages Curiosity rover science investigations for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The SAM investigation is led by Paul Mahaffy of Goddard. Two of SAM instruments key in these discoveries are the Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer, developed at Goddard, and the Tunable Laser Spectrometer, developed at JPL.

The results of the Curiosity rover investigation into methane detection and the Martian organics in an ancient rock were discussed at a news briefing Tuesday at the American Geophysical Union's convention in San Francisco. The methane results are described in a paper published online this week in the journal Science by NASA scientist Chris Webster of JPL, and co-authors.

A report on organics detection in the Cumberland rock by NASA scientist Caroline Freissenet, of Goddard, and co-authors, is pending publication.

For copies of the new Science papers about Mars methane and water, visit:

http://go.nasa.gov/1cbk35X

For more information about Curiosity, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/msl

and

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/

Learn about NASA’s Journey to Mars at:

http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-journey-to-mars/

From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow, Volume 5, Victory and Aftermath 1918-1919

B2050

What was not understood at the time was that the Second World War began in 1919 as the Treaty of Versailles forced Germany into unbearable humiliation. When war again resumed, the Royal Navy survived and triumphed on the lessons learned during WWI
This is a valuable reference work that reads easily and will satisfy the most committed enthusiast of naval history. By reprinting this work in paperback, the publisher has done a great service to the understanding of a very important period of history. History is no longer written on such an epic scale as publishers and authors pander to the attention deficit suffered today by many readers. This is such a shame, but works such as these provide a beacon for future authors and those who create historical works in new media.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow, Volume 5, Victory and Aftermath 1918-1919
DATE: 191014
FILE: R2050
AUTHOR: Arthur J Marder
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 417
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Dreadnought, naval arms race, German expansion, WWI, World War One preparation for war, Royal Navy, tactics, strategies, global warfare.
ISBN: 978-1-84832-203-5
IMAGE: B2050.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/pzt43h6
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This American author died in 1980 and during his career wrote some fifteen major works on Royal Navy history. His set of five volumes “From Dreadnought to Scapa Flow” made a major contribution to naval history. Volume Four has been reprinted and contains some illustration in the body of the book, but is primarily a text monologue. See also reviews for Volumes One to Five in this reviews database.

The author offers some great insights into the Royal Navy of its time, the politicians, the technology, the tactics and the changing threats. Arguably this can only be achieved from someone looking in from the outside.
In Fifth and final volume, the author concludes his immaculate study of the Royal Navy During WWI. At this point, the Royal Navy once more stood unchallenged after a bloody and demanding war that saw the introduction and extensive use of submarines and carrier aircraft. In 1918, the RN had lost its aircraft to the newly formed RAF, but continued with carrier development and the operation of airships. The raid on Zeebrugge was a great morale lifter before the Armistice was signed in November 1918. The German Fleet sailed to the Firth of Forth to surrender, steaming on into internment at Scapa Flow. Then, in June 1919, the German Fleet was scuttled, bringing to a total conclusion a major naval conflict.
Again, he covers all aspects, political, financial, military and operational, of this critical period of history that has done so much to shape the period that followed it.
The Royal Navy faced an immediate challenge when Germany became the primary enemy. For Centuries, the Royal Navy had faced a threat from Spain and France. This meant that the concentration of naval assets at home ran from the Thames Estuary, South along the Channel to the Cornish coast. To meet the German threat, the Fleet had to be moved North to Scapa Flow, from where it could close the German access to the Atlantic and confront the German Fleet in its home port of Kiel. At the same time, the Royal Navy faced the enormous task of protecting the maritime trade routes that crossed the world, linking the many nations and territories of Empire. Spread very thin, and often equipped with the oldest and least capable warships, the Royal Navy and the Merchant Navy were vulnerable to lone commerce raiders and small squadrons. The author explains very well how the Royal Navy and the politicians worked to reposition defences and provide an effective counter to German expansion.
The German U-Boats posed a serious potential threat to the Allies. German surface ships were, by 1917, unable to operate against the Royal Navy with any prospect of success, but submarines presented a threat that was new and therefore a threat against which no proven weapon system or tactics existed. The Royal Navy was therefore developing effective anti-submarine warfare for the first time. The use of convoys and new anti-submarine weapons, combined with effective tactics was to give the Royal Navy victory over the U-Boats and provided a legacy with which to fight the renewed submarine threat in WWII.
What was not understood at the time was that the Second World War began in 1919 as the Treaty of Versailles forced Germany into unbearable humiliation. When war again resumed, the Royal Navy survived and triumphed on the lessons learned during WWI
This is a valuable reference work that reads easily and will satisfy the most committed enthusiast of naval history. By reprinting this work in paperback, the publisher has done a great service to the understanding of a very important period of history. History is no longer written on such an epic scale as publishers and authors pander to the attention deficit suffered today by many readers. This is such a shame, but works such as these provide a beacon for future authors and those who create historical works in new media.

From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow, Volume 4, 1917 Year of Crisis

B2049 In Volume Four, the author continues his immaculate study of the Royal Navy into the |German attempt to cut the sea routes between Britain and North America, using U-Boats. Again, he covers all aspects, political, financial, military and operational, of this critical period of history that has done so much to shape the period that followed it. This is a valuable reference work that reads easily and will satisfy the most committed enthusiast of naval history. By reprinting this work in paperback, the publisher has done a great service to the understanding of a very important period of history. reviews.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com bgn.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow, Volume 4, 1917 Year of Crisis DATE: 191014 FILE: R2049 AUTHOR: Arthur J Marder PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword BINDING: soft back PAGES: 364 PRICE: £16.99 GENRE: Non Fiction SUBJECT: Dreadnought, naval arms race, German expansion, WWI, World War One preparation for war, Royal Navy, tactics, strategies, global warfare. ISBN: 978-1-84832-201-1 IMAGE: B2049.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/pzt43h6 LINKS: DESCRIPTION: This American author died in 1980 and during his career wrote some fifteen major works on Royal Navy history. His set of five volumes “From Dreadnought to Scapa Flow” made a major contribution to naval history. Volume Four has been reprinted and contains some illustration in the body of the book, but is primarily a text monologue. See also reviews for Volumes One to Five in this reviews database. The author offers some great insights into the Royal Navy of its time, the politicians, the technology, the tactics and the changing threats. Arguably this can only be achieved from someone looking in from the outside. In Volume Four, the author continues his immaculate study of the Royal Navy into the |German attempt to cut the sea routes between Britain and North America, using U-Boats. Again, he covers all aspects, political, financial, military and operational, of this critical period of history that has done so much to shape the period that followed it. The Royal Navy faced an immediate challenge when Germany became the primary enemy. For Centuries, the Royal Navy had faced a threat from Spain and France. This meant that the concentration of naval assets at home ran from the Thames Estuary, South along the Channel to the Cornish coast. To meet the German threat, the Fleet had to be moved North to Scapa Flow, from where it could close the German access to the Atlantic and confront the German Fleet in its home port of Kiel. At the same time, the Royal Navy faced the enormous task of protecting the maritime trade routes that crossed the world, linking the many nations and territories of Empire. Spread very thin, and often equipped with the oldest and least capable warships, the Royal Navy and the Merchant Navy were vulnerable to lone commerce raiders and small squadrons. The author explains very well how the Royal Navy and the politicians worked to reposition defences and provide an effective counter to German expansion. The German U-Boats posed a serious potential threat to the Allies. German surface ships were, by 1917, unable to operate against the Royal Navy with any prospect of success, but submarines presented a threat that was new and therefore a threat against which no proven weapon system or tactics existed. The Royal Navy was therefore developing effective anti-submarine warfare for the first time. The use of convoys and new anti-submarine weapons, combined with effective tactics was to give the Royal Navy victory over the U-Boats and provided a legacy with which to fight the renewed submarine threat in WWII. This is a valuable reference work that reads easily and will satisfy the most committed enthusiast of naval history. By reprinting this work in paperback, the publisher has done a great service to the understanding of a very important period of history.

From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow, Volume 3, Jutland and After May to December 1916

B2048 This American author died in 1980 and during his career wrote some fifteen major works on Royal Navy history. His set of five volumes “From Dreadnought to Scapa Flow” made a major contribution to naval history. Volume Three has been reprinted and contains some illustration in the body of the book, but is primarily a text monologue. See also reviews for Volumes One to Five in this reviews database. The author offers some great insights into the Royal Navy of its time, the politicians, the technology, the tactics and the changing threats. Arguably this can only be achieved from someone looking in from the outside. reviews.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com bgn.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: From the Dreadnought to Scapa Flow, Volume 3, Jutland and After May to December 1916 DATE: 191014 FILE: R2048 AUTHOR: Arthur J Marder PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword BINDING: soft back PAGES: 363 PRICE: £16.99 GENRE: Non Fiction SUBJECT: Dreadnought, naval arms race, German expansion, WWI, World War One preparation for war, Royal Navy, tactics, strategies, global warfare. ISBN: 978-1-84832-200-4 IMAGE: B2048.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/pzt43h6 LINKS: DESCRIPTION: This American author died in 1980 and during his career wrote some fifteen major works on Royal Navy history. His set of five volumes “From Dreadnought to Scapa Flow” made a major contribution to naval history. Volume Three has been reprinted and contains some illustration in the body of the book, but is primarily a text monologue. See also reviews for Volumes One to Five in this reviews database. The author offers some great insights into the Royal Navy of its time, the politicians, the technology, the tactics and the changing threats. Arguably this can only be achieved from someone looking in from the outside. In Volume Three, the author continues his immaculate study of the Royal Navy into the Jutland and post-Jutland period of World War One. Again, he covers all aspects, political, financial, military and operational, of this critical period of history that has done so much to shape the period that followed it. The Royal Navy faced an immediate challenge when Germany became the primary enemy. For Centuries, the Royal Navy had faced a threat from Spain and France. This meant that the concentration of naval assets at home ran from the Thames Estuary, South along the Channel to the Cornish coast. To meet the German threat, the Fleet had to be moved North to Scapa Flow, from where it could close the German access to the Atlantic and confront the German Fleet in its home port of Kiel. At the same time, the Royal Navy faced the enormous task of protecting the maritime trade routes that crossed the world, linking the many nations and territories of Empire. Spread very thin, and often equipped with the oldest and least capable warships, the Royal Navy and the Merchant Navy were vulnerable to lone commerce raiders and small squadrons. The author explains very well how the Royal Navy and the politicians worked to reposition defences and provide an effective counter to German expansion. Jutland was the first Fleet Action for the Royal Navy since the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Some will argue that it was a draw or even a defeat for the RN, but the reality was that the German High Sea Fleet was never to put to sea again until it steamed to Scapa Flow to surrender at the end of WWII. The RN was able to continue uninterrupted with the blockade by sea of Germany and to continue launching carrier aircraft at targets in Germany. Had the war lasted longer, the RN had prepared plans for a carrier aircraft strike at the German Fleet in port, a plan dusted down in WWII to destroy the Italian Fleet in port, using carrier aircraft. This is a valuable reference work that reads easily and will satisfy the most committed enthusiast of naval history. By reprinting this work in paperback, the publisher has done a great service to the understanding of a very important period of history.

Sparta at War, Strategy, Tactics, and Campaigns, 550-362 BC

B2047

Sparta has such a legend of invincibility, it may come as a major surprise to learn that this unique society rose and fell, then unsuccessfully attempting to rise again. The author has very capably described the process, providing a detailed analysis and vivid descriptions.

A rewarding read.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Sparta at War, Strategy, Tactics, and Campaigns, 550-362 BC
DATE: 191014
FILE: R2047
AUTHOR: Scott M Rusch
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 257
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Ancient Greece, City States, Sparta, Spartans, Great Persian Invasion, Peloponnesian War, military caste
ISBN: 1-78303-011-9
IMAGE: B2047.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/m4c8pla
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This well-researched book will be enormously valuable for all those embarking on an interest in the Golden Age of Greece, but it will also be valuable for established enthusiasts and scholars. This is a very readable text that is supported by single colour drawings and maps through the body of the book, and a very useful b&w photoplate section.

The rise and fall of Sparta has received attention from film makers and, as with other Hollywood forays into ancient history, this has not been entirely helpful as film makers play fast and loose with the historical background in which they have chosen to set a piece of entertainment and excitement. As a result, readers coming fresh to reading of the period will find a few surprises, but the lively and engaging style of the author will draw them successfully into the reality of the subject.

Sparta has such a legend of invincibility, it may come as a major surprise to learn that this unique society rose and fell, then unsuccessfully attempting to rise again. The author has very capably described the process, providing a detailed analysis and vivid descriptions.

A rewarding read.