British Steam Locomotive Builders

B2012 The first reaction to the book is WOW!! The amount of work that has gone into collecting all of the information and packing it tightly into 704 pages is impressive and has built a book that no serious enthusiast or historian can afford not to add to their existing library of essential works. 350 builders have been identified and recorded and the text is supported by 541 illustrations and 47 diagrams. In the process, it is possible that a builder has been missed, or a rare locomotive escaped inclusion, but it does not seem very likely. Even the most knowledgeable enthusiasts and historians will find some surprises when reading this book, it really is that comprehensive. It is one of those rare reference works where it will answer every question, if the readers only know enough to ask. reviews.firetrench.com brn.firetrench.com bsd.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: British Steam Locomotive Builders DATE: 160814 FILE: R2012 AUTHOR: James W Lowe PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword BINDING: hard back PAGES: 704 PRICE: £25.00 GENRE: Non Fiction SUBJECT: Steam locomotives, steam locomotive builders, factories, heavy engineering, steel production, rolling stock, railways, rail way companies, rail roads, trains, passengers, freight ISBN: 1-47382-289-0 IMAGE: B2012.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/oqzovmp LINKS: DESCRIPTION: The British Isles, including Ireland saw an amazing industry develop to construct railways and the locomotives to draw the rolling stock on them. For 170 years, a great variety of firms of every size, from the smallest through to considerable companies, established themselves and built an amazing variety of locomotives for use in the British Isles and for export to every corner of the World. Production ended in the 1960s, the British rail network was to be vandalized by politicians, and this book first published in 1975. It has been out of print for many years. The publisher and author will receive the thanks of the growing army of steam railway enthusiasts for bringing this work back into print. It is a tour de force in its field. The first reaction to the book is WOW!! The amount of work that has gone into collecting all of the information and packing it tightly into 704 pages is impressive and has built a book that no serious enthusiast or historian can afford not to add to their existing library of essential works. 350 builders have been identified and recorded and the text is supported by 541 illustrations and 47 diagrams. In the process, it is possible that a builder has been missed, or a rare locomotive escaped inclusion, but it does not seem very likely. Some of the larger builders may have survived for many years as steam locomotive builders, and covered a range of types and sizes of steam locomotive, but there were also companies that pioneered new technology, produced a small number of specialist locomotives, survived briefly and were very small companies. Until the nationalization of the railways after World War Two. Britain boasted an extensive network of rail lines and a number of competing rail companies, each with its own idea of what equipment it needed to deliver a service for passengers and freight. They patronized some builders to the exclusion of others and gradually technical standards came to be adopted to improve rail safety. Progress was impressive and some builders concentrated much of their efforts on the export market through the British Empire and beyond. Even the most knowledgeable enthusiasts and historians will find some surprises when reading this book, it really is that comprehensive. It is one of those rare reference works where it will answer every question, if the readers only know enough to ask.

German U-Boat Losses During World War II, Details of Destruction

B2011

This is a fully revised and updated edition of what must be the definitive reference on German U-boat losses. The author has conducted an exhaustive study and provides details of every U-boat sunk between 1939 and 1945, with the Allied units that sank them. This is an essential source for historians and enthusiasts, but it also provides a reference for anyone who is attempting to understand the enormous cost to the German U-boat service during WWII. Considering the effort expended in producing this highly detailed reference, the cover price is very aggressive, even before the traditional Pen & Sword discounting of newly published books and periodically to promote sales on multiple books relating to an anniversary or some other key event relating to the topics covered.

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NAME: German U-Boat Losses During World War II, Details of Destruction
DATE: 160814
FILE: R2011
AUTHOR: Axel Niestle
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 305
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, Second World War, WWII, Battle of the Atlantic, wolf packs, U-Boats, submarines, losses, anti-submarine, hunter-killer, convoy escorts, air power, maritime patrol
ISBN: 1-84832-210-3
IMAGE: B2011.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/oqrjog2
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a fully revised and updated edition of what must be the definitive reference on German U-boat losses. The author has conducted an exhaustive study and provides details of every U-boat sunk between 1939 and 1945, with the Allied units that sank them. This is an essential source for historians and enthusiasts, but it also provides a reference for anyone who is attempting to understand the enormous cost to the German U-boat service during WWII. Considering the effort expended in producing this highly detailed reference, the cover price is very aggressive, even before the traditional Pen & Sword discounting of newly published books and periodically to promote sales on multiple books relating to an anniversary or some other key event relating to the topics covered.

For the professional, the historian and the enthusiast, this carefully revised reference will need no introduction and be purchased to take advantage of the revision. The author will be well known by many, having spent more than thirty years as a private researcher, specializing in the Battle of the Atlantic, but also producing other work on military history during WWII. His illustrated monographs on the most famous Type VII C and Type IX C U-boats are the finest available.

For those wishing to extend their knowledge of WWII, submarine technology and tactics, this book is essential reading and it has been laid out in a very easy to read format, providing very fast access to particular information through extensive indexing of persons, ships and aircraft. For this category of reader, a question that may spring to mind is “why does a reference, of vessels lost 70 years or more ago, require a full revision?” The answer to that is that the author is frequently invited as a historical consultant to world-wide distributed TV documentaries on German U-boats. A number of these documentaries set out to identify a U-boat wreck or to disprove established wisdom on U-boat losses. There a number of reasons why original records are not completely accurate and these documentaries often convincingly put the record straight after extensive detective work.
The German Navy did of course maintain log books and war diaries that provide core primary source information, but these do not necessarily record the loss of a specific submarine. During a war patrol, a U-boat could and did stray from a patrol area as a result of a battle or because of weather conditions. When a U-boat failed to return from patrol, as a great many did, the U-boat Service frequently used intelligent guesswork to provide a record of loss. During battle, Allied aircraft and ships only really knew which U-boat they had destroyed, if it was brought to the surface and examined, or its crew escaped, to be taken prisoner. As a result, some discovered wrecks have been initially incorrectly identified and not every wreck has been located. Some of those inspected by deep divers, and ultimately identified convincingly, have been found to be vessels that had been thought to lay some distance from where they were found.

At the end of WWII, the Allies were keen to identifying exactly what the German losses were and what had happened to every vessel lost. This was a considerable exercise and involved the study of surviving German Navy records, interviews with surviving U-boat veterans, and extensive study of Allied reports and records. Not surprisingly, Allied and German records did not all agree and in several cases pragmatism closed a record incorrectly.

The author has probably done more than any other individual to find answers to open questions and to correct mistakes in existing knowledge of the U-boat campaigns and losses.

There may well be some inaccuracies remaining, but these will be very few in number. A few errors will probably remain for all time, unless someone discovers a document somewhere, or where divers locate a previously unknown wreck. The reader can therefore rely on the tables, lists and notes that make up this fine reference work, because there is no better record and any unidentified errors will be very few in number. In supporting the text, there are charts and an excellent selection of photographs. The book cannot be commended highly enough.

Why the Japanese Lost, The Red Sun’s Setting

B2010

The author is an experienced military historian and this is a worthy addition to his catalogue. He has provided a compelling argument for the rapid rise and fall of Japan in the 1940s. There is good illustration in a photo plate section to compliment the readable and well argued text. There have been a number of attempts to explain the rise and fall of Japan by historians, military officers, diplomats and enthusiasts. This book stands well to the fore and this reviewer considers it the best available account. A very useful addition to the library of any enthusiast or professional.

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NAME: Why the Japanese Lost, The Red Sun's Setting
DATE: 020814
FILE: R2010
AUTHOR: Bryan Perrett
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 234
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, , Second World War, WWII communications, natural resources, trading block, imperial expansion, Japan, US, UK, France, Netherlands, Asia co-prosperity zone, pre-emptive attack, Pearl Harbour, nuclear weapons, Pacific, China Seas, Seas of East Asia, carrier strikes, submarine wolf packs
ISBN: 1-78159-198-9
IMAGE: B2010.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nurfc6p
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author is an experienced military historian and this is a worthy addition to his catalogue. He has provided a compelling argument for the rapid rise and fall of Japan in the 1940s. There is good illustration in a photo plate section to compliment the readable and well argued text. There have been a number of attempts to explain the rise and fall of Japan by historians, military officers, diplomats and enthusiasts. This book stands well to the fore and this reviewer considers it the best available account. A very useful addition to the library of any enthusiast or professional.

The difficulty in approaching this subject is that the success and eventual failure of Japan is a complex subject that inevitably involves the colonial powers that Japan had to defeat to achieve its objectives of creating a trading area under its control.

Japan and China had both been reluctant to engage with the rest of the world and considered themselves superior to any other races. That inevitably gave way to war between China and Japan over the centuries and the Japanese usually came out on top or at least repulsed any Chinese attempt to invade and conquer the Japanese islands. Both countries had forced on them the trading interests of Europe and America. Japan was challenged in that it could not modernize and industrialize without access to raw materials that were principally controlled by European colonial powers and the expanding interests of the United States. It was therefore almost inevitable that Japan would attempt to gain control of natural resources by force and this in many respects had close parallels with the development of the British Empire, where a relatively small population with a maritime tradition, based in a small group of islands, faced a large and generally unfriendly land mass.

The difficulty that Japan faced was that any expansion would not only make enemies of European countries with interests in the area, but it would inevitably involve the United States. That meant that Japan could not repeat its invasion of China with a long term conflict where Japan could wear down the huge Chinese population. Any war of attrition with the US would inevitably end in defeat for Japan. The only answer would be a lightning war, advancing across enormous areas of land and water. To achieve that, the US would have to be severely damaged in a single surprise attack, allowing Japan to roll up the colonial powers who had become complacent and failed to strengthen their forces against possible Japanese expansion. The hope had to be that Japan would rapidly dominate the Pacific and then be in a position where its enemies would be unable to challenge the new status quo. That hope was only possible because the Japanese considered themselves immortal and superior to other races.

It could therefore be argued that Japan never ever stood a real chance of achieving its objectives. In cold logic that is a credible conclusion and it has been born out by the historical reality of WWII in the Far East. A more intelligent diplomatic stance by the colonial powers and the US could and should have stopped Japan before war was joined. That diplomatic failure encouraged the Japanese to believe themselves invincible. They were further encouraged by the failure of their potential enemies to reinforce their military capabilities and take the Japanese threat seriously. The success of the British in destroying much of the Italian Fleet in port by a surprise attack with carrier aircraft was carefully studied by Japan and seen as a military action that would readily transfer to the Pacific and China Sea.

In the event, Japan underestimated its potential enemies as badly as they underestimated Japan. In particular, the Japanese under estimated the speed with which the Allies bounced back, halting the Japanese expansion and then breaking the Japanese forces down in a bloody war of attrition as amphibious landings moved across the island chains, forcing Japan to give up its short conquests and taking Allied forces to within range of the Japanese home islands.

Progressively, Japan lost ships and aircraft that they could not replace. The dropping of two nuclear weapons on Japan has been hotly debated, as have the real reasons that may lay behind the decision to destroy two Japanese cities with two bombs. For the Allies, the bitter fighting and the fanatical resistance of Japanese forces did suggest that Allied casualties in taking the home islands could be very serious, perhaps more than democracies could bear. The political considerations of how the US and Europe would deal with Soviet Russia certainly provided some motivation to stage a display of the power of the new weapons. Whatever the motives, the two bombs proved the final blow that convinced the Japanese that they were not invincible after all and that the Allies could just destroy city after city until there were only smoking ruins. How much extra persuasion was required is open to argument. By that point, Japan had lost superiority at sea and in the air. However fanatical their troops, the preceding landings on the islands leading to Japan had shown the Allies could accept casualties and use their strong technologies to destroy Japanese resistance.

The author has dissected, analysed and explained, working through all of the key factors to build a case that is persuasive and compelling. This is an important book on the subject and deserves to be widely read as history is beginning to repeat itself.

Commando Despatch Rider, from D-Day to Deutschland, 1944-1945

B2009

The author was one of many combatants who ignored the orders prohibiting diaries and we must be grateful that he did. From this illegal personal record, he has drawn a book which captures the highs and lows of a soldier taking part in the most momentous amphibious assault in history, and the long slog from the beaches to Berlin. This is a delightful account of life in battle and between battles. It is by turns gripping, exciting, colourful, authentic and human.

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NAME: Commando Despatch Rider, from D-Day to Deutschland, 1944-1945
DATE: 020814
FILE: R2009
AUTHOR: Raymond Mitchell
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 234
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War Two, , Second World War, WWII communications, messengers, despatch riders, motorcycles. Royal Marines, Commando, 41 Royal Marine Commando
ISBN: 1-47382-292-0
IMAGE: B2009.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kg26rw3
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author was one of many combatants who ignored the orders prohibiting diaries and we must be grateful that he did. From this illegal personal record, he has drawn a book which captures the highs and lows of a soldier taking part in the most momentous amphibious assault in history, and the long slog from the beaches to Berlin. This is a delightful account of life in battle and between battles. It is by turns gripping, exciting, colourful, authentic and human.

The author served through the North-West Europe campaign, but he had already taken part in four amphibious assaults in the Mediterranean. As a seasoned Commando, he was prepared for D-Day but still awed by it. He explains his progress from rifleman to despatch rider and then provides a chronological account of life from the D-Day Beaches.

This is a valuable account, not because he achieved senior rank and directed battles, but because he was a lowly, but very important, part of the huge armed force that fought off the beaches, through France and on to Berlin. He provides a rare perspective and some readers may initially be mystified by the concept of the despatch rider. Today, wide band satellite communications can allow a commander to speak directly to the most junior soldier in combat on the other side of the world. That may not just be a conversation by radio link, but it may include video as the soldier sees the situation and can permit laptop computers and sensors to be fed into the link, providing the commander in his distant bunker virtually everything that he could obtain by parachuting into the battle line. This amazingly rich communications environment is not limited to a senior soldier communicating with a junior soldier, but can patch in a wide selection of other assets, including missile and gun bombardment of shore targets, ground support by jet aircraft and UAVs, and allies who can be asked to provide special support. In 1944 that was not yet even a distant dream.

Through WWII, despatches were the standard method of communications. Radio was available in limited numbers and with limited range. It was still developing and at Arnhem, the British paratroops were unable to communicate by radio over some three miles, much less with the aircraft that were braving the German flak but dropping the sorely needed supplies on ground held by the Germans. That was not an unusual situation. Not all vehicles carried radio and those that did frequently found their communications equipment was broken, the thermionic tubes, or valves, being relatively fragile glass encased electronic components. There was also only a poor knowledge of the performance of radio waves and how they could be effected by climatic conditions and weaknesses in components. Some of the frequencies in use were also affected by solar storms but these powerful natural forces were completely unknown at the time. It was often a mystery when a radio operator could suddenly receive very distant signals clearly but be unable to talk to someone just down the road.

In static positions, there was the field telephone system. Most systems used wire that included steel strands with copper to provide improved durability and the signallers who laid the cables left large loops of cable every so often to allow a signaller to rejoin cable hit by mortar or shell fire. The relative weakness was that the field telephone was most useful once the fighting had bogged down and soldiers fought from trenches. The other area of advantage was in linking positions behind the front to provide supply line communications.

Where units were engaged in fighting, runners could be used to send communication between the men and their officers. To be dependable, the distances had to be short and movement of the fighting had to be relatively slow. By 1939, the concept of fast moving mixed units of armour and mechanized infantry introduced a new challenge. Units could move rapidly and large distances could be covered. When the Marine Commando units were committed to the invasion of Europe, they became what they had originally been created for, Light Infantry. They were deployed with Army infantry and armour and became highly mobile. That required messengers who were equally mobile and, into this important niche, fitted the Despatch Rider.

The Despatch Rider had something of a roving brief and operated almost independently between the communications points. That could require him to cover an area searching for the advanced units. It offered independence and the despatch rider often used his freedom outside the official duties.

The author has provided a vivid picture of how his duties allowed him flexibility and relieved some of the inevitable periods of boredom, between the intense fighting periods. There is a well chosen photo plate section that contains rare images not previously published. An enjoyable book and very informative about an area of military life that has been very poorly covered before.

RHNS Averof, Thunder in the Aegean

B2008

The story of the Averof must be one of the least known from naval warfare during the Twentieth Century, if not the least known. This warship was from a class that was dominant in naval forces from the late 19th Century, until WWI. A few were modernized after WWI but most navies tried to replace the class as rapidly as possible. To the Greek Navy, the Averof was a capital ship, the largest in their fleet. Built in Livorno in 1910, she was soon in battle against the Turks, before the outbreak of WWI. She then served on with modifications, through WWII, to be laid up in 1945. Then against all odds, she was resurrected in 1984 to become a floating museum.

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NAME: RHNS Averof, Thunder in the Aegean
DATE: 020814
FILE: R2008
AUTHOR: John Carr
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 171
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, World War Two, First World War, Second World War, war at sea, naval technology, single ships, naval aviation, submarine warfare, anti-submarine warfare, armoured cruisers, post WWII, naval heritage, Greek navy, Royal Hellenic Navy, Battle of Cape Helles, Turkish Fleet, Balkan Wars.
ISBN: 1-78303-021-6
IMAGE: B2008.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nvftvy8
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The story of the Averof must be one of the least known from naval warfare during the Twentieth Century, if not the least known. This warship was from a class that was dominant in naval forces from the late 19th Century, until WWI. A few were modernized after WWI but most navies tried to replace the class as rapidly as possible. To the Greek Navy, the Averof was a capital ship, the largest in their fleet. Built in Livorno in 1910, she was soon in battle against the Turks, before the outbreak of WWI. She then served on with modifications, through WWII, to be laid up in 1945. Then against all odds, she was resurrected in 1984 to become a floating museum.

When the armoured cruiser first appeared it was very close to being a battleship. At that time, the Dreadnought was still to be launched and make battleships and armoured cruisers obsolete at a stroke. Battleships usually carried a mixture of gun sizes, all intended for use against other battleships and cruisers. Many had yet to be fitted with gun turrets and their weapons were mounted in barbettes or sponsons, with limited arcs of fire. This meant that the smaller battleships were often smaller than the largest armoured cruisers, very similar in appearance and with little advantage of heavier weapons.

The Averof was built for the Italian Navy but was bought for Greece and soon sent into battle against the Turks, causing them serious damage a the Battle of Cape Helles and then following this, little more than a month later in January 1913, with a stunning victory over the Turks at the Battle of Limnos.

In the 1920s, the Averof was subject of a major refit in a French yard, her torpedo tubes being replaced with more and better anti-aircraft guns. As the Germans overran Greece in WWII, the Averof made a courageous dash for Alexandria, dodging German air attacks to reach the British naval base in Egypt. She was then used to escort a convoy to India and became the first Greek warship to sail the Indian Ocean since the time of Alexander the Great.

At the end of WWII, the Averof was fully obsolete and laid up on the island of Poros. Happily she became the subject of a restoration program in 1984 and is now one of only three surviving armoured cruisers.

The author has provided a comprehensive review of the Averof and her history, including her slow and thorough restoration. There are a number of rare and interesting photographs in a plate section and the story of Averof is more than the story of one ship. Of the large numbers of armoured cruiser built by or for the world's navies, the three surviving examples are all that has been left to explain the place this class once held. An impressive and valuable account.

The Battle of the Atlantic

B2007

Captain Macintyre was a distinguished participant on one of the most critical battles of WWII. This book can be regarded as a primary source and the author pulls no punches. The scale of the battle as it raged for much of WWII is unlikely to ever be adequately covered by a single book. This book demands a place in any library of the subject and provides an unparalleled account of the U-boat tactics and the way in which the Allies evolved their convoy tactics and then set up hunter-killer groups to take the war to the submarines.

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NAME: The Battle of the Atlantic
DATE: 020814
FILE: R2007
AUTHOR: Donald Macintyre
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 184
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, war at seas, naval technology, convoys, single ships, naval aviation, submarine warfare, anti-submarine warfare
ISBN: 1-47382-287-4
IMAGE: B2007.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/lxb9flt
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Captain Macintyre was a distinguished participant on one of the most critical battles of WWII. This book can be regarded as a primary source and the author pulls no punches. The scale of the battle as it raged for much of WWII is unlikely to ever be adequately covered by a single book. This book demands a place in any library of the subject and provides an unparalleled account of the U-boat tactics and the way in which the Allies evolved their convoy tactics and then set up hunter-killer groups to take the war to the submarines.

There are a number of informative charts through the body of the book and a photo plate section with some rare images that support text that is already vivid, using quotes from German U-Boat commanders and Allied anti-submarine commanders.

It is difficult to place a specific proportional value on any individual battle, or even on campaigns. As Britain was dependent on external supplies of fuel, food and raw materials, the loss of the convoy battles would have had a serious and potentially mortal impact on the country and its ability to continue fighting. Churchill recognized the scale of the threat, but there were also other major threats, anyone of which might have brought the war to an end. However, the U-Boats had to completely halt all supply ships and seize or sink them to have any hope of reaching an unequivocal victory. That was unlikely because Canada and the US were beyond the U-Boat's reach and could continue to build replacement merchant vessels, warships and maritime aircraft. Britain could also squeeze some extra food out of home production and further tighten rationing to buy time to come back and break the blockade. To an extent that happened several times during the war.

Germany however were on a losing streak from the outbreak of war because it also needed external supplies and was unable to fully break the Allied blockade, or the destruction of materials by continuous aerial bombardment of German stores and production. German naval losses were at least as severe as Allied bomber losses but the ability to replace losses diminished as the war continued, in a way that was not matched in Allied bomber losses. A U-Boat took significantly longer to build than a bomber and required some of the scarcest exotic materials. Where a heavy bomber might have a crew of up to twelve, many bombers required fewer crew. The Mosquito was one example of a twin engine fighter bomber that was very heavily armed, very fast, only required a crew of two, and was made largely of wood and other non-strategic materials, but still carried a bomb load to match US four engine heavy bombers. Against that, a U-Boat required a crew of some 60 men, many of whom required skills that took years to fully develop. The result was that in a war of attrition, which is what rapidly developed, the U-Boat service was infinitely more vulnerable than the Allied air and sea blockade.

The Germans had expected to postpone the war until 1944 or possibly 1948 and had planned production of weapon systems accordingly. When Britain and France drew the line in 1939, the part of German war production most affected was the naval production and particularly the submarine production. Allowing for submarines heading out on patrol, those returning, and those undergoing repairs and maintenance, the German navy was only able to operate a handful of submarines actually on war patrol and many of those were coastal vessels unsuited to lengthy patrols in the mid Atlantic where Allied convoy protection was weakest.

Although great efforts were made to increase production and allocate crew, the U-Boat service was never in a position to make the final breakthrough and then hold the balance of power. It may have come close on several occasions, but Allied escort and hunting warships always bounced back stronger than before as the might of Allied war production began to develop surpluses to cover any short term reverses. In particular, the Allies were able to build a unique aerial advantage, forcing U-Boats to submerge and lose convoys, and then keep them located and submerged until hunter killer groups could reach them and destroy the submarines.

The author has provided what is probably the finest account of the Atlantic battles available anywhere. This is essential reading for any enthusiast or professional.

Major & Mrs Holt’s Definitive Battlefield Guide, D-Day Normandy Landing Beaches, Updatd Seventh Edition with GPS Locations

B2006

The reputation justly built for the authors' battlefield guides is such that anyone who has read any guide will immediately know that this is THE guide to buy for this particular battlefield. That this guide is now in its seventh edition speaks volumes for its accuracy and value. With each edition, the authors have further enhanced what was already a leading work in its field as a first edition. Some readers will already own several earlier editions, perhaps all of them. That again speaks volumes for the guide.

This is a guide that should be part of any enthusiasts library, an essential companion to family records and mementos, and an essential companion to any visit to the battlefield.

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NAME: Major & Mrs Holt's Definitive Battlefield Guide, D-Day Normandy Landing Beaches, Updatd Seventh Edition with GPS Locations
DATE: 020814
FILE: R2006
AUTHOR: Major & Mrs Holt
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 352
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, D-Day, Normandy Beaches, amphibious landings, airborne landings, logistics, terrain, bunkers, batteries, topography, planing, battlefields
ISBN: 1-84884-570-7
IMAGE: B2006.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/lxb9flt
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The reputation justly built for the authors' battlefield guides is such that anyone who has read any guide will immediately know that this is THE guide to buy for this particular battlefield. That this guide is now in its seventh edition speaks volumes for its accuracy and value. With each edition, the authors have further enhanced what was already a leading work in its field as a first edition. Some readers will already own several earlier editions, perhaps all of them. That again speaks volumes for the guide.

The purpose of this type of guide is not as simple as might appear at first glance. Obviously, the authors have distilled their exceptional knowledge of the battlefield and produced a guide that is sufficiently detailed that a reader who has never before visited the area could take just this book and follow its information and advice to experience a memorable visit. However, the guide also has an important place in any library of the genre and period as an information source that does not require a physical visit to the area. The authors have packed an enormous amount of information into a guide to the greatest amphibious assault in history. The descriptive writing sets out events and places in such detail, it is almost a video presentation. There are clear maps, photographs and captions spread through the body of the book and using full colour where available and appropriate. It is difficult to imagine any other author coming close to the achievement of this guide.

The authors have divided the battlefield into logical sections that make credible day visits and enable the reader to chose where to start. Each section has been updated and this edition includes GPS locations to take advantage of the personal GPS systems now in common use. Nothing has been overlooked and the guide covers all of the D-Day Beaches. It also covers the landing grounds used by British and American Airborne troops.

Two approaches to the area are defined and there are six timed and measured itineraries. The scope of the guide matches the events in depth, identifying all memorials and burial sites, in addition to the batteries, bunkers and landing fields. There is a well drawn historical background, together with information on War Graves Associations and the veterans and other commemorative associations.

This is a guide that should be part of any enthusiasts library, an essential companion to family records and mementos, and an essential companion to any visit to the battlefield.

It is difficult not to commend this comprehensive work most highly.

Book Review – Pasha

B2038

READ THE FULL REVIEW

It really doesn’t seem like this is the fifteenth story in the Kydd and Renzi series. For readers who have been greatly entertained by any, or all, of the previous fourteen stories, there is little a reviewer can say, other than to confirm that this is a worthy addition to the series and will provide as much pleasure and information as any of the preceding books. For those who have yet to read one of these stories, there is much to say without spoiling the many surprises in store for them in this gripping yarn.

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It’s Pasha Publication Day!!

B2038


It’s Pasha Publication Day!!
by BigJules
Today Pasha is officially launched in the UK; publication in the US and other countries follows.

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In a few minutes, Kathy and I will be heading off with Hodder Southwest Regional Sales Executive Julia Benson for a busy day visiting bookstores around the region.

Team Stockwin!

Team Stockwin will be raising a glass (or two...) tonight!

As always, on Launch Day evening, the Stockwins will be cracking a bottle of champagne and toasting the ongoing adventures of Kydd and Renzi. I vividly recall my first book contract for four Kydd titles – on sober reflection it seemed an enormous undertaking! Not that I didn’t have faith in my vision of around a dozen books all told, I did, but a new writer’s nervousness did creep in at times. But, as I got deeper into the historical record I saw that there was even more scope than I had at first thought. That initial estimate of the number of Kydd titles has now doubled.

One of the things that especially pleases me is the relationship Kathy and I have developed over the years during the creation of the books. It was Kathy who first started me on the path to becoming a published writer and she is now a very integral part of the writing process. As well as her role in hands-on editing – and many other things – for a large part of the time she keeps the real world at bay, allowing me to deeply immerse myself in the writing. It truly is Team Stockwin!

300-PASHA packshotHaving been a magazine editor-in-chief Kathy has a very strong sense of what makes for a good story. Once I’ve done the ground-work in terms of delving into the historical record and laying out the plot we get together and develop my initial thoughts into a strong beginning and a satisfying end, as well as fine-tuning the narrative arc of the book. Then I start the actual writing; along the way we often walk and talk the parts in the beautiful Longtimbers by the Erme River, making sure the right tension, personal stakes etc. are present and correct.

Pasha does have a few surprises in store for the reader and I’d be delighted to hear from you after you’ve read it.

Meanwhile, in between book signings, I’m cracking on with the next book, scheduled to be published this time next year. Not allowed to divulge anything about this one yet but again, I think I can promise a few more surprises in the lives of Kydd and Renzi!
You can check out Pasha extra for details of where to buy the book, early reviews, press interviews and more.
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Those Measureless Fields

B2005

This is a sensitively written love story set against the air war over the Western Front. This is a haunting story with a very surprising twist at the end. The descriptions of the air war and the society of the time are beautifully drawn by the author. Without spoiling the plot lines, with their twists and turns, this is a book that will appeal to a wide readership and rewards the reader's time.

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NAME: Those Measureless Fields
DATE: 020814
FILE: R2005
AUTHOR: Caroline Scott
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 369
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, First World War, The Great War, fighter pilots, SE5, Western Front, France, aces
ISBN: 1-78346-396-1
IMAGE: B2005.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/pzbs24z
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a sensitively written love story set against the air war over the Western Front. This is a haunting story with a very surprising twist at the end. The descriptions of the air war and the society of the time are beautifully drawn by the author. Without spoiling the plot lines, with their twists and turns, this is a book that will appeal to a wide readership and rewards the reader's time.

One hundred years on from the outbreak of WWI, many readers will have a poor idea of what the events really meant at the time. There are no longer living survivors from the Great War, many popular misconceptions, a total change from modern society, and, for many, the events will be no closer than the Napoleonic Wars, the Wars of the Roses, or the tales of ancient Rome.

The author has produced a totally absorbing tale and provided the pictures in words to lead the reader to feel a part of the times and the world in which the story is set. It is a love story with a young woman, two men and all that that produces, but seen through the eyes of one of the players from his final years, looking back through some of the greatest social changes of any point in history.

This book is highly recommended