The First World War A – Z, From assassination to Zeppelin – everything you need to know

B2044

This is an excellent pocket book and primer for the First World War. IWM is a unique military museum inspired by a desire to commemorate and explain the War-to-end-all-Wars, as WWI was then regarded, and the part played by the nations of the British Empire. It is therefore most fitting that this valuable pocket book has received contributions from many of the staff of the museum, to provide a first class overview through the synopses they have written. It follows the path of pocket books that can be used as an introduction for the young, or as a rapid reference by the enthusiast who may have a great deal of knowledge of the general subject.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: The First World War A – Z, From assassination to Zeppelin – everything you need to know
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 021114
FILE: R2044
AUTHOR: editor, Mark Hawkins-Dady
PUBLISHER: Imperial War Museum
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 175
PRICE: £
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, The Great War, World War One, First World War, Centenary, terms, works, names, titles, elements, descriptions, A to Z, synopses, events, people, technology, warfare, weapons
ISBN: 978-1-904897-85-9
IMAGE: B2044.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/m9ak8c9
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is an excellent pocket book and primer for the First World War. IWM is a unique military museum inspired by a desire to commemorate and explain the War-to-end-all-Wars, as WWI was then regarded, and the part played by the nations of the British Empire. It is therefore most fitting that this valuable pocket book has received contributions from many of the staff of the museum, to provide a first class overview through the synopses they have written. It follows the path of pocket books that can be used as an introduction for the young, or as a rapid reference by the enthusiast who may have a great deal of knowledge of the general subject.

The nature of the book makes it very difficult to provide a truly comprehensive record of a major war, the people who fought in it, the nations drawn into the battle, and the equipment developed and deployed. It also makes it very difficult to produce a standard form of illustration because of the diversity of alphabetic items covered. The editor has dispensed with illustration and that provides a text-only book with consistency. As the purpose of this type of book is to provide a fast reference of items that collectively provide a balance overview of a major global conflict, this lack of illustration is not a deficiency. Each item covered by the book has received an adequate amount of text. The style is concise and the total amount of information is impressive and would be even for a physically larger book.

With the vast amount of material being published for the centenary of WWI, this book fills a vital need. Enthusiasts who have specialized in a few aspects of the Great War will be drawn to expand their knowledge and one benefit of this pocket book is that it can be easily carried and used to check up on the many aspects of the war. As the contributors are each well versed in specific aspects of the Great War, there is a high level of understanding and accuracy. There is also enthusiasm for the subjects covered. Perhaps the greatest value of this book is that it is an affordable overview for the young and those who have just decided to be better informed of one of the great moments in history. This covers a great many people, because a centenary is a time when grandchildren and great grandchildren want to find out more about members of their family who are no longer there to give their own account.

A worthy and recommended publication

Gatwick Airport, The First 50 Years

B2042

Of the international airports around London, Gatwick is number two. This lavishly illustrated book charts the history of the airport from the purchase of a flying field in the 1930s by two young men. The quality of the illustrations is good to outstanding and the text is readable and concise, painting the picture of the history of Gatwick from a humble start to a bustling modern airport with good road and rail links for passengers. The author is a lifelong aviation enthusiast and his love of aviation enhances a very workman-like book that provides an excellent review of the airport and the struggles it has worked through

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Gatwick Airport, The First 50 Years
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 021114
FILE: R2042
AUTHOR: Charles Woodley
PUBLISHER: The History Press
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 160
PRICE: £7.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Day fighter, point interceptor, monoplane, Battle of Britain, fighter bomber, Maintenance Unit, VIP flights, night fighters, scheduled airline services, international airport, passenger aircraft, airlines, Dan Air, Continental, British Airways
ISBN: 978-0-7524-8807-3
IMAGE: B2042.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kyk739u
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Of the international airports around London, Gatwick is number two. This lavishly illustrated book charts the history of the airport from the purchase of a flying field in the 1930s by two young men. The quality of the illustrations is good to outstanding and the text is readable and concise, painting the picture of the history of Gatwick from a humble start to a bustling modern airport with good road and rail links for passengers. The author is a lifelong aviation enthusiast and his love of aviation enhances a very workman-like book that provides an excellent review of the airport and the struggles it has worked through.

In the 1930s, airports were only just arriving in Britain. There were many airfields but few airports. The air routes to Empire were still served almost exclusively by flying boats and even the larger airfields were still fields with few buildings and little concrete for taxi ways and runways. At that point, the majority of passenger aircraft were still single or twin engine aircraft, biplanes and fabric covered. Their relatively light weight allowed them to operate from grass strips and only a few, such as Croydon, serving London, had anything approaching an airport terminal as we would recognize it today. For long range flight, the flying boat still held the advantage that it did not require clearance of more ground to provide longer runways for heavier aircraft, and it could land and take-off from rivers and lakes across the British Empire.

WWII changed all of that. For Gatwick, it meant use of the airfield for fighters, ground attack and reconnaissance aircraft. For airports in general, the war saw the development of progressively heavier aircraft with the introduction of four engine heavy bomber landplanes. This produced an increasing number of airfields with long concrete runways and permanent buildings. Before the end of WWII, VIP air transport saw modified bombers used to transport key personnel and Gatwick was designated as a VIP airfield. At the end of WWII, there was a glut of ex-military aircraft, both large bombers and proven transports like the DC3/C-47. That provided the means of getting civil aviation of to an accelerated start, with ex-military aircraft being modified to provide improved passenger comfort, beginning to drive the flying boats out of business on the long distance routes.

The author has packed a great deal of information into what is an interesting and nostalgic look at the development of Gatwick into one of the most successful airports in the world. Amongst the photographs are some interesting shots of the wide range of aircraft to use Gatwick over the years. What helped Gatwick greatly in its formative years was a mainline rail station and proximity to the Brighton to London main road. These links have been further improved with the Gatwick Express providing a fast link from the heart of London. Gatwick became home to Dan Air, often referred to as Dan Dare after a comic strip, and over the years has seen several airlines come and go.

What the author has not done is speculate about the long term future of Gatwick. The lack of Government planning for London's airports has been a shambles through successive administrations. The result is that Heathrow continues to suffer procrastination over further runway and terminal space. A similar mess affects the future of Stanstead, Southend is emerging as a much larger airport with true international status. Luton continues to grow and Gatwick similarly manages to escape public debate, whilst debate continues over the practicability of building a completely new London airport in the Thames Estuary. The demise of Concorde has taken some pressure off the need for a London Airport away from the most populated airports where noise is less of an issue. Gatwick continues to provide valuable space for scheduled airlines and continues to provide good access to London. Perhaps there is another 50 years or more for the story to run.

Letters from the Light Brigade, The British Cavalry in the Crimean War

B2024

The Light Brigade became immortal, their fame stretching far beyond a British remembrance. History generally remembers the Light Brigade as the victims of poor leadership and a determination to charge artillery when prudence would have called retreat. However, there are also those who consider the Light Brigade as having achieved the objectives set but been let down by inadequate follow through that would have turned a costly repulse into a stunning victory. The controversy surrounding the Charge of the Light Brigade will probably continue long into the future, but this new book is based on the letters home from those who served on that fateful day. The author has made a very good selection of previously unpublished letters that were written within eight days of the battle. This is primary source material that provides unique insight.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Letters from the Light Brigade, The British Cavalry in the Crimean War
DATE: 190914
FILE: R2024
AUTHOR: Anthony Dawson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 242
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Light Brigade, Heavy Brigade, Crimea, Tzar, Russia, France, Balaklava, cavalry, gun batteries, leadership, communications
ISBN: 1-78303-027-5
IMAGE: B2024.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kul272o
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Light Brigade became immortal, their fame stretching far beyond a British remembrance. History generally remembers the Light Brigade as the victims of poor leadership and a determination to charge artillery when prudence would have called retreat. However, there are also those who consider the Light Brigade as having achieved the objectives set but been let down by inadequate follow through that would have turned a costly repulse into a stunning victory. The controversy surrounding the Charge of the Light Brigade will probably continue long into the future, but this new book is based on the letters home from those who served on that fateful day. The author has made a very good selection of previously unpublished letters that were written within eight days of the battle. This is primary source material that provides unique insight.

A fine selection of prints in a photo plate section complements the words of those who were there.

Given the current situation with a Russian invasion of the Crimea and parts of the Ukraine, this book should be recommended reading for a wide readership. The letters from the front in 1854 provide some valuable insights into a war which has received very little coverage by historians. This was potentially the trigger for major conflict. That it was contained within the Crimea was a happy accident.

HMS Bellerophon

B2023

The “Billy Ruffian” should have been one of the most famous Royal Navy warships of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. She will be known to enthusiasts and most probably for one of the simplest voyages she ever made, carrying Napoleon into exile following his defeat. The author has set out to redress this lack of knowledge with a fine account of a fine ship that served through the wars with Revolutionary France and then with Napoleon, covering the period form 1793-1815. She was present at some of the epic battles, including the great victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. This is a book that every enthusiast for the period and the war at sea, but it is also a fine account of long and dedicated service that must reach a wider readership.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: HMS Bellerophon
DATE: 190914
FILE: R2023
AUTHOR: Colin Pengelly
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 303
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Wooden Walls, Nelson's Navy, line of battle ships, 74 guns, sailing Navy, Trafalgar, Nile, blockage, Imperial Navy.
ISBN: 1-78346-240-X
IMAGE: B2023.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kul272o
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The “Billy Ruffian” should have been one of the most famous Royal Navy warships of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. She will be known to enthusiasts and most probably for one of the simplest voyages she ever made, carrying Napoleon into exile following his defeat. The author has set out to redress this lack of knowledge with a fine account of a fine ship that served through the wars with Revolutionary France and then with Napoleon, covering the period form 1793-1815. She was present at some of the epic battles, including the great victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. This is a book that every enthusiast for the period and the war at sea will want to add to their library, but it is also a fine account of long and dedicated service that must reach a wider readership.

HMS Bellerophon was a standard line of battle ship of the period. Mounting 74 guns, she was a typical Wooden Wall of Nelson's Navy. Bellerophon saw extensive service across the range of duties during the period. Much of the service was on blockade, which could be tedious duty, but she saw much close combat with the enemy. She was present at the Battle of the Nile which destroyed Napoleon's attempts to seize control of the Middle East and India. To be in the line of battle at Trafalgar was a savoured honour for any Royal Navy warship.

She sailed the oceans, from the Channel and the North Sea, to the Mediterranean and the West Indies. As with many of Nelson's ships, the Billy Ruffian was built at Chatham and the author has given a good account of her design and construction. Sadly, Britain did not think to deliberately preserve its most famous warships. Even the Victory came close to being scrapped on several occasions. Napoleonic War vessels did continue in some form of service beyond 1815. The larger vessels were frequently used as hulks, accommodating young seamen, prisoners of war, or convicts due for deportation to the colonies. Some became breakwaters and others were moored in creeks along the Essex coast as watch points. It was a sad end to vessels that had served their country and proved the pivotal point of the wars, ensuring British victory.

The book contains a great deal of fine detail, without becoming boring to the less enthusiastic reader. The author's style is easy to read and the small photoplate section contains a good selection of images. There is a very good index and an appendix section that includes a handy glossary.

Although the subject is HMS Bellerophon, the author has painted a convincing picture of the Royal Navy through the period. The Seven Years War may have been the point when Britain achieved naval dominance, but the period from 1793 to 1805 was the point where that dominance was affirmed and then held for a hundred years. The war at sea continued right up to the end of the wars in 1815, but there was no question that the Royal Navy was supreme at sea, maintaining a blockade on Napoleonic Europe and ensuring eventual total victory. Without that position, the dash for Empire could not have taken place, and a long period of relative peace maintained.

Read this book and understand what Napoleon came to appreciate on his voyage into exile as a passenger on the Billy Ruffian.

The Forts & Fortifications of Europe 1815-1945, The Central States, Germany Austria-Hungary and Czechoslovakia

B2022

This is the most comprehensive work on the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century forts and fortifications of the central European States. The authors are veteran historians with a considerable knowledge of forts and fortifications. Here, they provide an in depth review of these structures in central Europe and provide valuable insight into their use during WWII. This book is essential reading for anyone with an interest in the subject, but also provides a useful introduction for those wishing to develop a knowledge of fortifications and their impact on the conduct of war.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

brn.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com


NAME: The Forts & Fortifications of Europe 1815-1945, The Central States, Germany Austria-Hungary and Czechoslovakia
DATE: 160814
FILE: R2022
AUTHOR: J E Kaufmann, H W Kaufman
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 25i
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Forts, fortifcations, fortress, strong point, bunker, battery, coastal fortification, coastal gunnery, gunnery direction, obstacles
ISBN: 1-84884-806-4
IMAGE: B2022.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kul272o
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is the most comprehensive work on the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century forts and fortifications of the central European States. The authors are veteran historians with a considerable knowledge of forts and fortifications. Here, they provide an in depth review of these structures in central Europe and provide valuable insight into their use during WWII. This book is essential reading for anyone with an interest in the subject, but also provides a useful introduction for those wishing to develop a knowledge of fortifications and their impact on the conduct of war.

Forts and fortifications serve several purposes. A fort may vary considerably in size and power. It may provide a protected forward observation position, guard a critical crossing of routes and watercourses, provide a powerful fire base, or form part of a larger concentration of fortifications that are intended to provide a barrier to invasion. Historically, forts have also provided a base from which an armed force can go forth and relieve other military units in the field. When combined with artillery, a fortification provides reach and the introduction of the gun allowed that reach to extend out to a considerable distance, with later artillery pieces being able to send shells out more than twenty miles.

At the start of the period covered by this book, fortifications and gun positions were routinely built to cover ships in anchorages. Unlike a ship afloat, a gun battery in a stone fort could fire heated shot from a static and stable position with greater accuracy than a ship could fire its guns. Where the battery was located on a cliff, its canon could be fired down onto enemy ships, whilst their canon might not be able to land shells on top of the cliff because the gun mounts were designed for use mainly against other ships and lacked the elevation required to fire on high ground.

Inland, fortified gun batteries enjoyed similar advantages and were place to command critical points, primarily important rivers, crossing points and highways. Their increasing weakness lay in the development of field guns and portable siege guns that could be brought up to bombard the fortifications and create breaches in the walls. Where the enemy had freedom to move his gun batteries, the fort or fortification was fixed in one position and unable to move to avoid counter battery fire.

From 1815 there were many developments in the technology of fortifications. The Central European States shared boundaries that were not always defined by a river obstacle. To offer a deterrent defence, these countries embarked on an ambitious building program that extended across the period covered by the authors. Over the years, these fortifications continued to be developed, strengthened and extended. Where a Medieval fortification was confined to a castle at a key location, or walls around a city, the Nineteenth Century saw attempts to build extended fortifications in a way not attempted since the building of the Great Wall in China or the Roman walls built to provide a continuous obstacle from sea to sea or river to river.

The invention of barbed wire, as a cheap method of fencing, to fence considerable areas of land to contain herds of cattle, provided a very effective method of quickly erecting man-proof fencing in front of trench lines or between stone and concrete forts. The development of long range artillery mounted in barbettes and turrets enabled extended frontier defences to site strong points that could overlap in their arcs of fire, supporting each other against a mobile enemy that might attempt to focus on one gun position. By the Twentieth Century, naval artillery direction had reached the point where similar gun directors could be employed in extended land fortifications.

The art of fort and fortification building might be described as a triumph of optimism over experience. Although the technologies improved, all of these very costly defences proved ineffective in deterring invasion, or dealing with invasions that were undertaken. The problem was that fixed defences are very costly and take a great period of time to develop. As they are built, they leave weak points and fail to cover the full extent of a border. In each case, an enemy was able to plan a campaign that saw troops going around a defence line and the troops tied up in the defences being unable to rapidly redeploy to face the enemy forces that had bypassed the fortification. There were also situations where diplomatic actions and bullying resulted in boundary changes without conflict that then rendered strong defences useless because the border had moved beyond them requiring new fortifications to be built at great cost and over an extended period of time. By 1918, the tank had made fixed defences largely obsolete. It was in effect a mobile fort that could be combined with other units and moved quickly to new positions, producing a combined firepower equal to many fortifications, but free to chose its place of battle.

The authors have described the technological developments and the weakness of forts and fortifications in a style that is easy to read, and with many good illustrations through the book to support the points they make. With much of the focus of historians on the Low Countries and North West France, this book is also something of a novelty in covering the centre of Europe with its equally important military structures and political challenges.

Boeing 747, A History, Delivering the Dream

B2021

The author is well-known in aviation enthusiast circles for the quality of his research and writing on aviation subjects. This book can only enhance his reputation and expand his readership. The subject of this new book is also very well known internationally, but that does not mean there is not more to learn and that there is still scope for surprises. The publisher has fully supported the excellent job done by the author, producing a book that is well illustrated and with full colour photographs through the body of the book. Aviation enthusiasts will certainly add this book to their libraries, but the fame of the aircraft will undoubtedly appeal to a very much wider readership.

The author has provided what may prove the definitive history of the 747, and the most comprehensive and understandable review of one of history's most impressive aircraft. This is not just a book for the aviation enthusiast, but a history for all those who flew in the aircraft, those who will fly in it in the future, those who see it pass over, a very wide readership and a book that deserves to be widely read.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

brn.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Boeing 747, A History, Delivering the Dream
DATE: 160814
FILE: R2021
AUTHOR: Martin W Bowman
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 256
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Airline, passenger jet, freight, four engine, Boeing, 7XX, 747, 707, Comet, trans-Atlantic, long range, Queen of the Skies, Renton, Seattle, Supertanker, fire-fighter
ISBN: 1-78303-039-9
IMAGE: B2021.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kul272o
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author is well-known in aviation enthusiast circles for the quality of his research and writing on aviation subjects. This book can only enhance his reputation and expand his readership. The subject of this new book is also very well known internationally, but that does not mean there is not more to learn and that there is still scope for surprises. The publisher has fully supported the excellent job done by the author, producing a book that is well illustrated and with full colour photographs through the body of the book. Aviation enthusiasts will certainly add this book to their libraries, but the fame of the aircraft will undoubtedly appeal to a very much wider readership.

The US came late to the jet age and would have come to it even later had the British not shipped documents and whole engines across the Atlantic from 1940. To that pool of knowledge was added the results of German work on jet flight that was taken back to the US in the form of tons of documents and drawings, research figures, actual aircraft and engines. Given the significant production capacity in the US aviation industry, it was strange that they did not rapidly catch up in 1945. As it was, Britain had continued to devote resources to preparing for a civil aviation industry after WWII, and developing military jet aircraft in a second generation to follow the wartime Meteor and the Vampire that just missed WWII in Europe. The Canberra bomber was an enormously successful aircraft with an amazing performance for what was really a first generation jet bomber and its designers were also well advance with what became the Mach 2 Lightning fighter. In the US, the aero industry contented itself with converting military transport and bomber aircraft to the civil role and were very unhappy when the British Comet jet airliner appeared and pioneered jet passenger flight.

However, the gross mismanagement of the British economy by successive administrations and the general lack of available funding meant that the British aviation industry suffered and began to lose its place at the front of civil aviation. While British politicians were busy crippling the aircraft companies, the US aviation industry moved steadily ahead and the Boeing 707 was a very successful introduction. It was much larger than the Comet and benefited from the protracted period of work to correct the stress issues that the first jet airliner had suffered. Important though the 707 was to aviation history, Boeing was working on a real masterpiece in the form of the 747. Effectively, Boeing produced a growing family of commercial aircraft that were scaled up or down from the 707. By under-slinging the engines, Boeing was able to relatively easily change the type and power of engines, where the British approach of embedding engines in the wing made the change of an engine type a problematic situation.

The 747 became the most recognized civil aircraft in the world and carried an enormous workload both in freight and in passengers. Hundreds of thousands of passengers have been carried through more than forty years. There have also been many variants designed for special purposes, including aerial tankers, fire fighters and freight aircraft.

The author has provided what may prove the definitive history of the 747, and the most comprehensive and understandable review of one of history's most impressive aircraft. This is not just a book for the aviation enthusiast, but a history for all those who flew in the aircraft, those who will fly in it in the future, those who see it pass over, a very wide readership and a book that deserves to be widely read.

The Suffragette Bombers, Britain’s Forgotten Terrorists

B2020

The author has provided an exciting and very readable account of a subject that has remained almost unknown. The photo plate section provides some interesting and supportive images. This is an instructive account at several levels, covering specifically the woman of the suffrage movement in Britain, but also providing insights into what radicalises individuals and encourages them to threaten the safety of others in pursuit of an idea, concept or desire.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

brn.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: The Suffragette Bombers, Britain's Forgotten Terrorists
DATE: 160814
FILE: R2020
AUTHOR: Simon Webb
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 188
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Crime, fraud, deception, injury, confidence tricks, terrorists, bombs, explosives, terror campaigns, universal suffrage, voting systems, equality, human rights
ISBN: 1-78340-064-1
IMAGE: B2020.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/kul272o
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author has provided an exciting and very readable account of a subject that has remained almost unknown. The photo plate section provides some interesting and supportive images. This is an instructive account at several levels, covering specifically the woman of the suffrage movement in Britain, but also providing insights into what radicalises individuals and encourages them to threaten the safety of others in pursuit of an idea, concept or desire.

Today, feminists are happy to perpetuate the false picture of suffragettes as brave young women who used civil disobedience to win the vote for all woman in Britain. It couldn't be much further from the truth. The movement was headed by wealthy young women who held extreme and anti-Semitic views. They were prepared to use violence against the innocent and this included arson and bombings. As this reality does not fit the politically correct brigade, it takes some courage for an author to give a true and graphic account.

What is largely overlooked is that British democracy before the late 1960s was not based on any form of universal suffrage either for men or for women. It had been slowly evolving from a voting system based on land ownership and constituencies that were handed down through families. Some will argue that the rotten boroughs have been maintained by Labour and LibDems, with the most unacceptable examples being seats in Scotland. The argument continues to claim that the corrupt postal voting introduced by Labour has returned the voting system to a point where one person can vote several times. These arguments are being supported by the fact that a recent crack down on postal voters has seen millions removed from the lists and a hypocritical rear guard fight by Labour and the LibDems to maintain the Scottish rotten boroughs and ensure that the English cannot vote on Scottish matters, while Scots are able to vote on English matters.

When the suffragettes were at their most active, a land owner with property in two or more constituencies was entitled to vote in each. Many potential voters were not listed or entitled to be listed. Women could fairly claim that they were the most disadvantaged group, but they were not alone.

As the author records, suffragettes continued in aggressive politics after the vote was extend to women, many joining the Fascist Party.

Most readers will be very surprised to discover the extent of arson and bombing carried out by suffragettes. They chose soft targets like any terrorist group and the intention was to cause death and injury. Railways, churches and government buildings were favoured targets and the first terror bombing in Ulster was not perpetrated by the IRA, but by suffragettes. The last attack was an explosion in Westminster Abbey in June 1914 and the campaign appears to have been ended directly by WWI when any attacks could be treated as treason and the population was actively assisting the security services in the wave of anti-German sentiment.

As the author points out, the irony was that the suffragettes delayed the granting of voting rights to women and an extended campaign could have prevented women from being able to vote for decades after the date when they did in fact receive voting rights.

This is a most fascinating book and so many airbrushed facts are presented by the author that the reader will come away with a completely different view of the suffragette movement and the extremists who filled its ranks.

Military Detention Colchester From 1947, Voices from the Glasshouse

B2019

The author has very ably described how the Colchester Military Corrective Training Centre has evolved since it opened in 1947. The changes in society since then have been dramatic. In both civil and military society, women have been courted to make up for the lack of men, and represent in the workplace the same proportions as in the population as a whole. The Army still hopes to train malefactors and turn them into acceptable and useful soldiers but methods have had to change to remain acceptable to society as a whole.

The text of this valuable new book is supported by many photographs and these are rare in the public domain. On completing the reading of this book, the reader will come away with a new appreciation of life for those who work at Colchester 'Glasshouse' or 'Colly', and those who are detained there. The author has generously agreed to give royalties from sales of the book to military charities.

reviews.firetrench.com

adn.firetrench.com

brn.firetrench.com

bsd.firetrench.com

bgn.firetrench.com

nthn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

NAME: Military Detention Colchester From 1947, Voices from the Glasshouse
DATE: 160814
FILE: R2019
AUTHOR: Carole McEntee-Taylor
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 250
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Crime, fraud, deception, military punishment, injury, confidence tricks, genealogy, genetic, nurture, nature, scams
ISBN: 1-78340-059-5
IMAGE: B2019.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nhwarsh
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The author works at the Military Corrective Training Centre and has painted a fascinating picture of life for those detained in the “Glasshouse”. She describes how a former PoW camp became a prison for military offenders after WWII and has become the only British military detention and training centre. She has told the story through the voices of a representative selection of prisoners and guards, by turns, funny, sad and surprising.

Military detention has always differed from civilian prisons and had more purpose. In most societies, crime and punishment have always been a contention of correction, isolation, punishment, removal, re-education. Emotion has played a large part in drafting laws and building the enforcement and punishment systems. Society is always keen to forget the problems of crime. The result is that prisons have always been grim places where society's malefactors are removed from society for as long as possible, with remarkably little proportionality or consistency. When the cost of detention centres rises, society is reluctant to build the number of prisons necessary to provide space for all those who the courts would like to imprison. That often means that dangerous prisoners are released for no better reason than a lack of space to accommodate them. All too often, offenders who are unlikely to benefit from imprisonment end up with lengthy sentences, whilst hardened criminals are put back on the streets, after learning new criminal skills from fellow inmates. This lack of consistency makes the job of the guards even more difficult.

For millennia, civil society has sent prisoners for punishment, placing them in insanitary cells, overcrowding prisons and paying inadequate humane attention to food, medical care and access to education. Until very recently, most societies made extensive use of capital punishment to permanently remove offenders. Of those executed, there would also be some very dangerous individuals who had committed the most heinous of crimes, but the majority, not far beyond living memory, were guilty of relatively trivial crimes.

Today, the death sentence has been abolished in most countries that consider themselves 'civilized', without giving much thought of how to deal with dangerous prisoners who may now live for several decades but never be safe to release back into society. There has also been a growing trend to sending those with mental illness into the prison system because there is nowhere else to send them. All in all, civil prisons have largely failed because society has failed to produce an effective way of dealing with people who in some way behave outside what society considers 'reasonable' and 'normal'.

As detention, punishment and correction are little talked about and rarely presented as historical information, it is not unreasonable for most to think that there is no difference between the military systems and the civil systems. The reality is that although military systems have often been as or more brutal than the worst civil penal systems, they generally have been more positive and less confused.

In time of war, military organizations have an insatiable appetite for manpower and are prepared to take what they can get, including forced service. The press gangs may now be a thing of the past, compulsory service is really little different and more widespread. The result is that an army ends up with a proportion of soldiers who have grown up as potential criminals and endured hardship. Onto that socially unpromising base, an army then teaches the recruits to use violence to order. In peacetime, an army may shed personnel, but that does not mean they shed the least desirable first and pass the problems over the civil system of crime and punishment. Even when an army is a professional organization of soldiers who chose to serve, a proportion will always break the code of conduct they are required to follow. As military organisations have an unusually high proportion of young people, there are a set of potential problems that are most common amongst the young.

However, military and civil systems follow the changes in society for better or for worse. That makes change the primary constant.

The author has very ably described how the Colchester Military Corrective Training Centre has evolved since it opened in 1947. The changes in society since then have been dramatic. In both civil and military society, women have been courted to make up for the lack of men, and represent in the workplace the same proportions as in the population as a whole. The Army still hopes to train malefactors and turn them into acceptable and useful soldiers but methods have had to change to remain acceptable to society as a whole.

The text of this valuable new book is supported by many photographs and these are rare in the public domain. On completing the reading of this book, the reader will come away with a new appreciation of life for those who work at Colchester 'Glasshouse' or 'Colly', and those who are detained there. The author has generously agreed to give royalties from sales of the book to military charities.

Canada’s Chief of the Defence Staff attends the 2014 Pacific Command Chiefs of Defence Conference

image001

November 6, 2014

OTTAWA — The Chief of the Defence Staff, General Tom Lawson, today concluded a trip to Brunei, where he participated in the 16th Annual United States Pacific Command (PACOM) Chiefs of Defence (CHODs) conference.

adn.firetrench.com

ftd.firetrench.com

The PACOM CHODs conference provides a forum for senior military leaders to build and strengthen military-to-military relationships, discuss issues of common interest and promote multilateral cooperation between the militaries of participating nations.

 

Quick Facts

· The 16th Annual Chiefs of Defence Conference was held in Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei, and was attended by the senior military leaders of most Pacific Rim nations. Topics of discussion included strengthening multilateralism, global governance, as well as new and emerging security challenges.

· The Pacific Command Chiefs of Defence Conference is the key meeting in the Asia-Pacific region for senior military leadership. Established in 1998 by United States Pacific Command, this forum brings together senior military leaders from nations in the Asia-Pacific region to meet and discuss mutual security challenges, improve mutual relationships and to foster security cooperation.

· In addition to supporting Department of National Defence / Canadian Armed Forces goals, the Pacific Chiefs of Defence Conference represents a great opportunity for the CAF to support the whole of government approach to defence and security in the Asia-Pacific region.

· The United States Pacific Command is a Unified Combatant Command of the United States armed forces responsible for the Pacific Ocean area. It is comprised of U.S. Army Pacific, Marine Forces Pacific, U.S. Pacific Fleet, and the Pacific Air Forces, which are all headquartered in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Quotes

“The 2014 Pacific Command’s Conference provided a great opportunity for me to meet with my counterparts, to discuss issues of common concern, and to continue to build on our defence relations. As a pacific nation, it is a priority for Canada to build on our capacity to work together with partner countries from across the region, to contribute to the security of the Asia-Pacific, and to be prepared to respond to humanitarian crises when they arise.”

General Tom Lawson, Chief of the Defence Staff

 

Related Products

Backgrounder – Canada’s Defence Relations in the Asia-Pacific Region

Associated Links

United States Pacific Command (USPACOM)

Project Odyssey

B2092 This is a workman-like, entertaining, technology-based thriller. It contains all of the highs and lows of the heroine's progress, the road blocks and the ways around them. There is a generous sprinkling of violence, greed, jealousy and politics, with some nicely drawn characters. The pace is good and the plot line solid. It is a cracking read, enjoyed by this reviewer. reviews.firetrench.com brn.firetrench.com bsd.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: Project Odyssey CATEGORY: Book Reviews DATE: 031114 FILE: R2092 AUTHOR: Lynda Chervil PUBLISHER: CreateSpace BINDING: soft back, also eBook PAGES: 218 PRICE: £12.99 GENRE: Fiction SUBJECT: ISBN: 978-1-5009-5226-6 IMAGE: B2092.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/uaqhhu LINKS: DESCRIPTION: This is a workman-like, entertaining, technology-based thriller. It contains all of the highs and lows of the heroine's progress, the road blocks and the ways around them. There is a generous sprinkling of violence, greed, jealousy and politics, with some nicely drawn characters. The pace is good and the plot line solid. It is a cracking read, enjoyed by this reviewer. The author's approach is interesting. Every author has something that he or she wants to say. When the writing starts, there may be hopes for riches, but many authors do not have money as their main objective. Almost every author wants to see if their great idea translates to pen and paper successfully and says what the author wanted to say. If the work is completed and published, the author has created an environment into which the reader is invited. It can therefore be argued that the reader is also creating a variation on the environment by interpreting the authors thoughts and words against the reader's pre-conceptions. That is one of the constraints on the reviewer of a book. As people will spend good money on something that the reviewer likes, an attempt at fairness to the reader and author must be made. The author clearly has a personal and business interest in what have sometimes been described as 'green' issues and in part this book is advocacy of the broad spread of these issues. Some readers may not agree with this view of the world today and the numbers have been growing, following a series of exposures of the climate fraudsters who form the Global Warming fraternity, and the climate deniers who refuse to accept the overwhelming evidence that global warming halted nineteen years ago. The difference in belief should not destroy the enjoyment of a good story. Given the very poor knowledge of climate cycles and related matters, either camp could be correct to some degree and the debate should take place with open-mindedness and good humour. The most valid complaint about climate fraudsters is that they not only suppressed information that countered their basic case, but that they did this in full knowledge under the justification that, 'we don't want to confuse the simple people with facts'. The climate fraudsters have also been trying to surround themselves with a mixture of things that deserve to be followed up and may hold considerable merit. Then in a final fraud, they have replaced 'global warming' with 'climate change' since global warming has become discredited, but still mean global warming – a deceit that dare not speak its name. In the same way that personal beliefs in climate issues should not spoil a good story, the reader should perhaps not pay much attention to the use of real people and real companies in the story. The author starts by saying that she hopes the reader will be entertained and the names of some of the key players in the story and their companies could as easily have been replaced by completely fictional people and entities. It is always a matter of debate by an author as to how a fiction should relate to real people. With historical fiction it is much less an issue because the path of the real characters is known and cannot develop further because they have lived and died. With the use of real contemporary individuals, they may be subject to major variations in fortune or behaviour after the author has completed writing. In this respect, the author is unfortunate that some individuals and corporations are being seen in a different light as a result of events that have taken place since the book was completed. The commercial space industry has achieved amazing things since being freed from many controls by a US Administration that has performed very poorly and wants to cut public spending but is afraid to simply close down the space industry. However, there are people who will seize on any vulnerability of this industry. When the author wrote this fictional story, Virgin Galactic was already more than five years behind schedule in being able to take passengers on a very short trip into space, but it had made much progress and every pioneering enterprise takes risks for the simple reason that there is no manual to work to. Through history, the first to attempt something take great risks that do not always pay off, but the first to achieve that thing usually makes great profits. To attempt and fail is better than to fail to attempt. Progress always runs over the pain of failure. It was therefore virtually inevitable that Virgin Galactic would suffer some painful episode and sad that in the crash of the spaceship a life would be lost. Equally inevitably, there has been no shortage of people denigrating the company and its plans. Describing the flights Virgin hopes to offer as 'bungy jumping for billionaires' is not entirely inaccurate, but it is denigrating and unnecessary comment. Thus far, no commercial company has offered a flight into the edge of space. The first to succeed will carve a place in history and be able to go on to offer longer flights and orbital flight, hotels in orbit around the Earth, and trips to the moon and beyond. How quickly that is to be achieved is yet to be seen, but the starting point has to be more modest. A fatal crash does not help, neither does the rush to condemn and accuse. Sir Richard Branson is a marmite businessman loved and hated in equal measure. It would not be a surprise that corners may have been cut, but the inquiries following the crash may not find anything untoward, other than a failure of industry knowledge or a human mistake, or an unpredictable component failure. The recent explosion on launch of another commercial space product is also attracting clams and counter claims. The company did reduce costs by buying unwanted rocket motors from Russia and it may prove an economy too far, but that is as yet unproven as the cause of the incident. The real cause of the explosion may prove very different and a rocket is a complex piece of engineering with many parts. Some failures will be completely unavoidable and provide knowledge that allows them to be avoided in the future. While the author may have been unlucky in with some incidents occurring after she had completed her story, SpaceX has turned in a solid performance and has a list of successful space launches to its credit, with its Dragon spacecraft having successfully flown in space and docked with the International Space Station, before returning to Earth and being successfully recovered. That compares with a lavishly funded ATV program from the European Space Agency that may have flown successfully, but the spacecraft has to be discarded, to burn up in the upper atmosphere. ESA has also lost launchers to explosions, and managed to place two very expensive Galileo GPS satellites in the wrong orbit. Against those sorts of failures, the commercial space industry has been doing pretty well. So the author has backed one runner that came up lame, and one runner that is thus far doing well. The basis of the story is a power station in orbit and that may not yet have been achieved but the idea was first mooted by the engineer and science fiction writer Arthur C Clarke who also postulated the geostationary satellite, without which modern global communications and broadcast entertainment would not have been possible. Before that brilliant and innovative new concept, satellite communications was a challenging activity. Communications were only possible as the satellite passed over the ground station and the ground station had to position itself to find the next satellite as it came up over the horizon and then follow it until it disappeared over the opposite horizon. Achieving that was initially very crude, with a 360 degree photograph being made of the site to site above a 360 degree radio image inside the control room. A hole was then cut in the dish antenna and a CCTV camera positioned behind the cut out. The control staff then moved the dish, disk and control room weighing in at 50 tons, on its axis until the CCTV image sat over a graduation on the 360 degree photograph. Crude but effective, and happily replaced by constellations of geostationary satellites. Laser and microwave tests have been conducted now for many years to enable power to be beamed up or down from Earth to satellite, and to provide effective data links. The basis of the story is therefore assured because the elements described do exist and have been proven effective, so that Clarke' extraordinary concept of four decades ago could move from science fact to operational capability. Why attempts have not already been made to build an orbiting power station is something of a mystery, but then the carbon fuel producers and the climate fraudsters combine against this form of exciting development, with the climate fraudsters heavily backing technologies that have already been proven to be marginal at best and unable to exist without massive subsidies and political pressure. Britain and Europe have committed to a savage program of 'carbon cuts' based on a claim that although these cuts will not save the planet, they will provide a shining example for other countries, and continue to fund huge wind farms to further cut, literally, the numbers of migrating swans. Just in that one small example the numbers of migrating swans have halved and look set to halve again this year. Radio pollution from off-shore wind farms has already caused marine accidents by blinding radar. Against the many serious disadvantages, wind turbines have failed to delivery the promised power output, but have become part of the blind policy of climate fraudsters and inadequate politicians. The author has advocated a technology with a greater ability to deliver and it follows along with the plot line to produce a credible story. Whatever your beliefs and prejudices, read this story and enjoy it as a story. If you really believe strongly in saving the planer, buy the eBook version which won't denude the Brazilian rain forest even if the technology it depends on may have some very ungreen characteristics – but then there is no such thing as a free lunch.