Book Review – Warship 2014

B1981

The Conway annual Warship is an eagerly awaited treat for enthusiasts and naval professionals. Its price limits the readership but is inevitable for a work of this quality and authority.. Each year, Warship Notes, to the back of the book, provides an interesting selection of short articles and a review of some of the outstanding naval books of the year.

This year, there are main contributions from eight acknowledged specialists in the fields.

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NAME: Warship 2014
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 120614
FILE: R1981
AUTHOR: editor John Jordan
PUBLISHER: Conway,
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 208
PRICE: £40.00
GENRE: Fiction
SUBJECT:
ISBN: 978-1-84486-236-8
IMAGE: B1981.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/m7ohonl
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Conway annual Warship is an eagerly awaited treat for enthusiasts and naval professionals. Its price limits the readership but is inevitable for a work of this quality and authority.. Each year, Warship Notes, to the back of the book, provides an interesting selection of short articles and a review of some of the outstanding naval books of the year.

This year, there are main contributions from eight acknowledged specialists in the fields.

With the naming and floating of the new British super carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth, there is a well-timed article covering CVA-01: Portrait of a Missing Link. CVA-01 should have been built as a replacement for HMS Ark Royal (IV). In the event the Wilson Regime cancelled CVA-01 and prematurely scrapped HMS Eagle and HMS Ark Royal which would have left Britain without a carrier and fixed wing fast jets and left the Falkland Islanders at the mercy of Argentine bandits. Fortunately a canny senior Naval Officer smuggled the Invincible Class carriers past Minister of Defence Healey by calling them through-deck cruisers. By adding the superlative Sea Harrier to the new through-deck carriers' air groups, Britain had the means to strike back at the Argentine invaders and liberate the Falkland Islanders. More recently the liberal Prime Minister Cameron repeated the Wilson treachery by scrapping the Sea Harrier and the Invincible Class without confirming that the new Queen Elizabeth carriers will ever enter service.

In a separate article, the Japanese Light Carrier Ryujo has been reviewed.

An article on the French armoured cruisers and another on the Japanese armoured cruisers reviews a class of warship that has long since disappeared from service, nicely complimenting the article on the Russian Turret Frigates and an article on the German pre-dreadnought classes Braunschweig and Deutschland.

There is a fascinating article on the escape of the French battleship Jean Bart in 1940, one of the least known episodes of WWII. One of the most controversial episodes of the war was the British bombardment of the French warships harboured in North Africa. The counter argument has always cited the French scuttling of their warships in French ports when German troops moved into Vichy France, as evidence that the sinking of the North African warships was unnecessary. The Jean Bart demonstrates a further option followed by a number of French warships in 1940 that it was possible to escape the German invasion. In the case of the Jean Bart, she joined the North African Fleet but, once at sea she could have emulated other French warships and made for a British port to fight on for the Free French Forces and the eventual liberation of France. This persuaded Churchill that he could only rely on French warships that joined the Free French in Britain or were destroyed and beyond German reach.

Each year, Warship includes at least one technology article. This year, the Royal Navy's post-war attempts to produce effective shipboard fire control systems is reviewed very effectively. This was a very interesting period for gunnery at sea. The aeroplane had emerged as the principle weapon system to defend and attack warships. It had led to even battleships increasing their anti-aircraft guns to such an extent that the naval big gun was almost obsolete. Mechanical computers, optical and manual aiming was giving way to electronic computers and radar. As history was to demonstrate, the gun survived. Even 16 inch guns were fired in anger by the last US battleships forty years after the 'experts' had predicted they were obsolete. The smaller calibre guns were to enjoy widespread use as Close In Weapons Systems, and the work conducted in the 1940s and 1950s laid a base for future gun control systems.

Perhaps the most interesting article reviews the Italian multi-role carrier Cavour. She demonstrates an alternative to the very large super-carrier, such as the Queen Elizabeth class, and the even larger US nuclear-powered carriers. Arguably, the British Invincible carriers were a little too small and the Cavour weighs in at 27,520 tonnes, less than half the size of the QE class but almost 50% heavier than the Invincibles. Cavour is able to operate as a carrier with Sea Harrier or other VSTOL and STOVL fast jets with a ski ramp at the fore end of the flight deck. She can carry a wide range of helicopters and tilt rotor aircraft which would allow concentration on anti-submarine operations or for amphibious task force deployments. Having a roll-on ramp in the stern, the Cavour could also be used to move land forces. This provides for great flexibility and also allows the Cavour to deploy on humanitarian missions in the wake of natural disasters. With the rise in the numbers of UAVs in use by navies around the world, the Cavour is more the size of a large UAV carrier, but possibly slightly larger than this type of warship will be. For a country with the scale of economic challenges faced by Italy, a warship of the size of Cavour is a very brave decision.

Warship 2014 has certainly maintained its established standards and it is to be hoped that sufficient new readers will stretch to the price to maintain the future for what has become an important information source . In the past, dedicated naval enthusiasts and naval professionals always made sure that they had a copy of the latest Warships in their libraries and public libraries purchased copies that enthused new readers and made the work available to a wide audience. With the round-down of many public libraries, this type of important book is under pressure and many similar publications have ceased to be published. On the other hand, inflation means that the cover price is shrinking in real terms, so perhaps it is more affordable than many commentators give credit.

Book Review – Hitler’s Spyplane Over Normandy 1944

B1979 This book contains some truly outstanding and rare photographs. The text is well-written and supports the lavish illustration. The subject was one of the first generation combat jets and aviation enthusiasts will welcome its new insights. reviews.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com bgn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: Hitler's Spyplane Over Normandy 1944 CATEGORY: Book Reviews DATE: 120614 FILE: R1979 AUTHOR: Philippe Bauduin PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword BINDING: hard back PAGES: 179 PRICE: £25.00 GENRE: Non Fiction SUBJECT: First generation jets, jet bomber, jet reconnaissance aircraft, German Air Force, technology, photo reconnaissance, photo interpretation ISBN: 1-473823-339-0 IMAGE: B1979.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/nbhbuxe LINKS: DESCRIPTION: This book contains some truly outstanding and rare photographs. The text is well-written and supports the lavish illustration. The subject was one of the first generation combat jets and aviation enthusiasts will welcome its new insights. The author was a photo interpreter in the French Air Force and brings a special view of the AR234. His enthusiasm for his subjects may be questioned by some readers but this is a good translation of his work into English and any bias towards some aspects of the book is fair comment from an author who has researched his subject well and drawn his own conclusions. The difficulties surrounding early jet combat aircraft and a desire to claim 'firsts' inevitably introduces some controversy. It was a pioneering era when several people independently came to some discoveries at around the same time. A Briton, Whittle, can fairly claim to have invented the jet engine as a practical locomotive force. He was poorly supported and opportunities were lost. The Germans took the axial configuration approach while the delayed British designs took the centrifugal configuration in their engine design. Both approaches had merits and weaknesses. At the time, some argue, the British approach was much more suitable to the available materials and claim that British engines were more reliable and delivered the expected thrust. They were also slower to spool up than the German axial jets which reduced initial acceleration when Meteor and Vampire pilots needed to increase speed. In the event, the British and the Germans introduced prototypes and then production warplanes at around the same time but the respective aircraft were never to meet in combat. This was as much to do with the state of the war than anything else. The Germans were desperate for magic solutions as they were forced back and the Allies established air supremacy in Europe, The Americans were to rely initially on British technology when they began to start design and construction of first generation jet combat aircraft. The British had a large number of outstanding propeller aircraft in service of which the Mosquito was to offer much of the benefits of jet warplanes, but with amazing multi-role capability and the reliability of piston engines and propellers. In the closing stages of WWII in Europe, even the best German designs would not have justified wholesale replacement of the Mosquito and in its bomber and reconnaissance roles it directly compared favourably with the AR234. The AR234 suffered initially from a temporary take off under carriage and landing skid and from twin jet engines that provided significantly less power than had been forecast. It was not until the AR234 was fitted with four engines that it came close to original performance expectations. The relatively slow rate of production, the inevitable teething problems and the very short hour life of its jet engines, meant that the AR234 was available in very small numbers, required the pilots to learn to use its advantages, and was really more of a prototype than a full service warplane. The author has provided some very interesting insights and this book will be enjoyed by aviation enthusiasts.

Book Review – That Quiet Earth, A First World War Tale

B1980 This is a very human story set against the torments of war and authentic in the sensitive portrayal and careful research. As such it will appeal to a very wide section of readers with its humanity, violence, stress, and background. It requires no great knowledge of war, of the period, or of the technologies, or of any great enthusiasm. The story enfolds the reader and transports them into the tale. It is a great read. reviews.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com bgn.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: That Quiet Earth, A First World War Tale CATEGORY: Book Reviews DATE: 120614 FILE: R1980 AUTHOR: Bruce Fellows PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword BINDING: hard back PAGES: 179 PRICE: £16.99 GENRE: Fiction SUBJECT: Fiction, war story, pioneer aviation, Great War, SE5b, young pilots, adventure, mental stress ISBN: 1-78383-180-4 IMAGE: B1980.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/mrhvdry LINKS: DESCRIPTION: The author takes an interesting look at life in 1918 through the eyes of an old man considering his youth and the air war over France in 1918. Without spoiling the absorbing story, George Bridge is remembering his secret and the events when he and his friend Billy Love fight for their lives. What particularly marks this story out as one which should become an epic of First World War aviation stories is the quality of the research that has so clearly gone into the writing and the vivid pictures it paints of a time long past, now beyond living memory. The story is rich in vivid descriptions of flying and combat, The author has captured the conditions, the society, the aspirations of the young men who went off to fight in a vicious war of attrition. It provides an authentic portrayal of pilots at war, against to madness and terror of war. It shows the enormous pressures placed on these young men and ease with which battle fatigue could lead to personal decline and into mental torment. The characters are also nicely captured and contain depth. This is a very human story set against the torments of war and authentic in the sensitive portrayal and careful research. As such it will appeal to a very wide section of readers with its humanity, violence, stress, and background. It requires no great knowledge of war, of the period, or of the technologies, or of any great enthusiasm. The story enfolds the reader and transports them into the tale. It is a great read.

Book Review – Honourable Warriors, Fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan

B1978

This is a penetrating account of the fight against the Taliban in Afghanistan by a British officer. Major Streatfield has been outspoken in his analysis of foreign intervention in Afghanistan, providing a thought-provoking and personal perspective. He has compared the Taliban tactics with the British response and offered a record of daily fire-fights and the daily threat of IEDs.

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NAME: Honourable Warriors, Fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan
CATEGORY: Book Reviews
DATE: 120614
FILE: R1978
AUTHOR: Richard Streatfield
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 219
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Asymetric warfare, terrorists, freedom fighters, holy warriors, Asian conflict, NATO, US, UK MOD, The Rifles, air support, IED
ISBN: 1-78346-227-2
IMAGE: B1978.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ohs2f9b
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a penetrating account of the fight against the Taliban in Afghanistan by a British officer. Major Streatfield has been outspoken in his analysis of foreign intervention in Afghanistan, providing a thought-provoking and personal perspective. He has compared the Taliban tactics with the British response and offered a record of daily fire-fights and the daily threat of IEDs.

The text reads well, giving an absorbing account of life for The Rifles in the battle zone. It is supported by a photo section of colour images of life for the author and his comrades in Afghanistan.

Perhaps the most striking aspect of this book is in the similarities it shares with letters and reports from Afghanistan more than 150 years years ago. The Army of the Indus marched into Afghanistan to enforce a British view of peace on a tribal population that was happy to fight anyone. An invader could be fought by all, but if there was no invader there was always the opportunity to fight neighbours and follow feuds through generations.

There will long be debate of the merits and threats of invading Afghanistan. Politicians have been less than honest or constant in their justification for an asymmetric war that has cost so many American and British lives, causing far higher casualties amongst Afghans and yet had such a small and temporary effect on a country that is still in a place centuries away from Europe and in a culture that matches the harsh countryside.

This is a book that should be widely read. Many readers may take a different view from that expressed by the author, but he has served in theatre and provides insights that are only possible from direct experience. Even if all NATO troops are withdrawn to the timetable conceived by politicians to suit election timetables or a desire to reduce budgets, Afghanistan will still exist and continue to present all of the challenges and threats that it has presented before.

The dangers that Afghanistan has presented and will continue to present are not unique to Afghanistan. We live in an increasingly dangerous world and a world were there is a widening gulf between those countries that have and those that have not. There may have been no real option originally but to invade Afghanistan, but once there, the US took its focus away to Iraq and never refocused. That lack of attention has cost lives and meant that the peace has not been won. Some will question whether the peace ever could have been won because politicians have failed to understand the society and the needs of Afghans and tried to apply European concepts that are alien. Sadly there is rarely a Wingate Pasha around when you need one.

Book Review – Jack Hunter, The French Connection

B1977 Therefore, as a stand-alone tale, it fits into the swords and dungeons genre that has become very popular. Within that genre, it blends historical facts and details with imagination to produce an absorbing saga that unfolds with all of the twists and turns that the reader will expect to see. It is nicely written and a tale that is entertaining and gripping. A reviewer could therefore claim that it is a book that sits well in the upper levels of its genre, but there is a special twist. reviews.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: Jack Hunter, The French Connection CATEGORY: Book Reviews DATE: 120614 FILE: R1977 AUTHOR: Martin King PUBLISHER: Razor Sharp BINDING: soft back and electronic PAGES: 300 PRICE: £8,99 GENRE: Fiction SUBJECT: Fiction, thrills, thriller, action, adventure ISBN: 978-0-9571021-1-8 IMAGE: B1977.jpg BUYNOW: LINKS: DESCRIPTION: Reviewing a fictional work presents a special challenge. The reviewer must attempt to reconcile two unreconcilable factors. The review should provide a fair and objective presentation of the book and its contents, but the reviewer must avoid spoiling the readers enjoyment in reading the subject of the review with the surprises that an author carefully crafts into the story to maintain the readers' interest and to entertain. This book is part of a developing series, but is a self-supporting story that does not mandate the reading of other titles in the series. For the reviewer, entering the series with this book, there is no option to relate the story to others from the same author, or to know how the series will develop in later books. Therefore, as a stand-alone tale, it fits into the swords and dungeons genre that has become very popular. Within that genre, it blends historical facts and details with imagination to produce an absorbing saga that unfolds with all of the twists and turns that the reader will expect to see. It is nicely written and a tale that is entertaining and gripping. A reviewer could therefore claim that it is a book that sits well in the upper levels of its genre, but there is a special twist. In the past, sword and dungeon tales have been published in paperback printed form. As for any book, they are bounded by the benefits and constraints of printed paper. Size and weight is a factor and, by tradition, the paperback has been produced to fit into a pocket or luggage and allow the reader to dip into the story at convenient moments, or dedicate the time to sit down and read from cover to cover. That format has been challenged in two ways. The eBook provides an electronic facsimile that is intended to look much like the printed paper version, but be held in a reading device that can hold a large number of books in a volume that is much less than a typical paperback. This certainly allows a reader to take a library in the pocket, rather than just one or two books. It also allows a householder to build and extensive library that requires almost no bookshelf space. There are two further benefits. A reader device with an eInk display screen relies in exactly the same way as a printed paper page, by reflecting light. Alternatively, a colour display that requires a back light can display in full colour without requiring the substantial cost increase that colour printing requires. There has also been the introduction of video games that have become very popular and increasingly sophisticated. The animation standards are now reaching the point where they are very close to a film that uses real people. In the near future it is probable that 3D displays will project a video game that looks and feels like an extension of the space the viewer occupies. The boundary between reality and virtual reality will become progressively more blurred and the viewer will feel a part of the story, rather than someone looking in. This new book is exploring a further possibility by operating alongside an app that tuns it into a pioneering interactive augmented reality book. In the process it adds to the challenges of reviewing it. The best that this reviewer can offer is the conclusion that it is a new experience that should be enjoyed. As an entertainment package, it is really good value and mind expanding. It cannot be compared critically with a printed fiction book, an eBook, or a video game. It provides a new level of experience in entertainment. It has considerable potential for further development but at this point is is an engaging process that provides 360 degree virtual reality, challenging the reader to solve the riddle of The French Connection. The reader is able to experience something new and form an opinion of where this novel approach should go. It is an exciting new future for story telling and entertainment.

Book Review – Death, Dynamite and Disaster, a Grisly British Railway

B1976 Today, British railways present a mixture of reactions from frustration at overcrowded commuter trains, to the joy of rolling through magnificent scenery. Few travellers give much thought to how this, still, extensive network came to be built, who built it and under what conditions. This new book sets out the stark realities of the gangs of workers who toiled in often unbelievable conditions, facing significant danger, and suffering high casualty rates. reviews.firetrench.com brn.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com bgn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: Death, Dynamite and Disaster, a Grisly British Railway CATEGORY: Book Reviews DATE: 120614 FILE: R1976 AUTHOR: Rosa Matheson PUBLISHER: The History Press BINDING: hard back PAGES: 224 PRICE: £9,99 GENRE: Non Fiction SUBJECT: transport, engineering, steam trains, Victorian industry, navies, navigators, work gangs, risk, danger, rail lines, terrain, rail cuttings, tunnels, tunnelling, explosives, manual labour ISBN: 978-0-7524-9266-7 IMAGE: B1976.jpg BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ok7p6qu LINKS: DESCRIPTION: Today, British railways present a mixture of reactions from frustration at overcrowded commuter trains, to the joy of rolling through magnificent scenery. Few travellers give much thought to how this, still, extensive network came to be built, who built it and under what conditions. This new book sets out the stark realities of the gangs of workers who toiled in often unbelievable conditions, facing significant danger, and suffering high casualty rates. This is a small pocket-able book that packs a great deal of information between its covers. It demonstrates the author's solid research, and it includes a selection of drawings, sketches and formal images in single colour through the body of the text. The author has covered the grisly realities and addressed the full cross section of incidents, from the dangers of construction, to accidents in operation and the risks from Irish terrorists. This is a book that will appeal immediately to train enthusiasts because it fills in some of the gaps in the wealth of rail history books and it considers the safety, or lack thereof, that was an important factor in the rush to connect British towns, villages and markets. However, it should also appeal to a wider readership because it provides insights into Victorian Britain and the vital part that railways made to industry and society. It is all too easy to overlook the factors that created considerable risk in early rail travel. The technology was pioneering and in the earliest days tested materials and manufacture to the extreme. This is perhaps most obvious in respect of steam boilers and the pressures that could build up at a time when remarkably little was known about the requirements for iron and steel. It was also a major factor in the laying of rail lines. When the canals had been built in the decades before rail, obstacles were addressed by building locks and reservoirs. There was a small number of spectacular tunnels but, in the main, it was much easier to build flights of locks and to build canals around many obstacles. The railways introduced a new set of challenges. The track had to be as straight and level as possible. That inevitably meant that rail builders had to make a multitude of cuttings with deep embankments and lengthy bridges and viaducts. It also required miles of deep tunnels and the need to include ventilation shafts, some of considerable length. As a result, the terrible early safety record is perhaps more remarkable in th\t it could have been so much worse. A fascinating book that treads carefully through a gruesome history to provide fresh insight into the times and the technology.

Book Review – Henry Maudslay, Dam Buster

B1975 This is an engaging story of a schoolboy who went from school to the wartime RAF and was in so many ways representative of a generation of RAF pilots. Robert Owen is the Official Historian of the No. 617 Squadron Association. He has acquired material from family, school, official archives and personal letters and recollections. This has produced an impeccable base for the careful research, combined beautifully into a story that captures the essence of the subject. reviews.firetrench.com adn.firetrench.com nthn.firetrench.com bgn.firetrench.com ftd.firetrench.com NAME: Henry Maudslay, Dam Buster CATEGORY: Book Reviews DATE: 120614 FILE: R1975 AUTHOR: Robert Owen PUBLISHER: Fighting High BINDING: hard back PAGES: 364 PRICE: £29,95 GENRE: Non Fiction SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, 1939-1945, Special Operations, Dam Buster, Bouncing Bomb, Avro Lancaster, Barnes Wallis, Rhur dams, 617 Sqn ISBN: 978-0-99262-070-7 IMAGE: B1975.jpg BUYNOW: flightinghighbooks@btinternet.com LINKS: DESCRIPTION: This is an engaging story of a schoolboy who went from school to the wartime RAF and was in so many ways representative of a generation of RAF pilots. Robert Owen is the Official Historian of the No. 617 Squadron Association. He has acquired material from family, school, official archives and personal letters and recollections. This has produced an impeccable base for the careful research, combined beautifully into a story that captures the essence of the subject. As with so many books on the young men who took part in the massive aerial battlefield over Europe, the most curious aspect to modern eyes is that these exceptional individuals were also very ordinary. They came from a broad spectrum of society but the majority had been educated in a private school system that had evolved to produce officers and officials to protect and administer an Empire. Henry Maudslay went directly from boyhood to manhood, leaving school and immediately volunteering for the RAF in 1940. He first flew missions in Handley Page Hampdens which were described as medium bombers and very similar in configuration to their German opponents, with the crew grouped closely together at the front of the aircraft and with a modest bomb bay below them. Hampden performance was equally modest and dramatically different from the Avro Lancaster four engine heavy bomber that he was rapidly selected to fly. Many young men flew the Lancaster on raids over a heavily defended Germany, where even at night they faced both flack guns and fighters. Each night they set out knowing they faced the same heavy odds and that required a special personal courage. Henry was very special amongst a company of special people and was selected to join a mysterious squadron being formed for a special mission. 617 Squadron was commanded by Wing Commander Guy Gibson who had distinguished himself and been considered the most suitable commander for this special squadron from amongst many special pilots. His crews were all hand picked and represented the best from their squadrons. For the mission they were to fly selected new Lancasters that were then modified to carry the special bomb. The dambuster bombs had to be dropped from very low level by aircraft flown at night over water, That required intensive training flights under conditions as close as possible to those expected on the mission. On the raid, the aircraft flew through heavy flack and faced very difficult approaches to their targets. Henry was to attack the Eder dam and made several attempts before dropping his bomb. The weapon struck the parapet and detonated on impact which meant the explosion was very close the aircraft and some histories state that his aircraft was destroyed. In fact, his aircraft and crew survived, only to be brought down near the Rhine with the loss of all crew. This is a gripping tale and the publisher and author are to be commended for bringing it to print and supporting the text with an excellent photo plate section. Those who took part in the dam raids should all merit a history of this quality. Each was considered amongst the best of their skills and the single special action lends itself particularly to immaculate research and sensitive writing.

Canada continues to provide military equipment to Ukraine

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War on Terror - Russian Nazi Leader Putin

August 9, 2014

Department of National Defence

Ottawa

 

Another aircraft filled with military equipment for Ukraine left today as part of Canada’s ongoing support to that country against Russian aggression. One Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) CC-177 Globemaster III strategic airlifter departed from 8 Wing, Canadian Forces Base Trenton and will arrive in Ukraine early next week.

 

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Quick Facts

 

- This is the second of a series of flights to transport non-kinetic military equipment to Ukraine.

 

- Canada’s contribution, in the amount of up to $5 million through Canada’s Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF), includes a range of targeted protection, medical and logistical equipment, such as helmets, ballistic eyewear, protective vests, first aid kits, tents and sleeping bags.

 

- The CAF’s response in support of this request promotes security in Central and Eastern Europe, and demonstrates the readiness and professionalism of the CAF.

 

- Canada has four CC-177 Globemaster III aircraft based out of 8 Wing Trenton. These aircraft are used for a wide range of strategic and tactical missions including the rapid delivery of troops and cargo anywhere in the world.

 

 

Quotes

 

“Since the onset of the crisis, Canada has stood proudly alongside the people of Ukraine and taken important steps to support the country, including by imposing internationally supported sanctions. Canada is proud to be able to support Ukraine with this supply of equipment.”

 

The Honourable Rob Nicholson, PC, QC, MP for Niagara Falls and Minister of National Defence

 

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CC-177 Globemaster III Factsheet and Photo Gallery: