Your Towns & Cities In World War Two, City Of London At War 1939-45

The very popular “Your Towns & Cities At War” series is building a unique collection of volumes providing a detailed local view of all parts of the British Isles during WWII. This new book provides the story of the City of London during WWII, the most bombed city and the first city to be attacked by cruise and ballistic missiles – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME:   Your Towns & Cities In World War Two, City Of London At War 1939-45
FILE: R3198
AUTHOR: Stephen Wynn
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword 
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, British Isles, 
towns & cities, London, City of London, The Blitz, economic centre, docks, civilians, 
air raids, terror raids, cruise missiles, ballistic missiles, fire fighting, ARP, Air Raid 
Wardens, fire watchers, Auxiliary Fire Service, London Fire Brigade, fire boats, River 
Thames

ISBN: 1-52670-830-2

PAGES: 169
IMAGE: B3198.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y3t562ob
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The very popular “Your Towns & Cities At War” series is building a 
unique collection of volumes providing a detailed local view of all parts of the British 
Isles during WWII. This new book provides the story of the City of London during 
WWII, the most bombed city and the first city to be attacked by cruise and 
ballistic missiles – Very Highly Recommended.


The story of London in WWII is unique as a complete story. The Luftwaffe tried to totally destroy it and the will of the British people, failing miserably to reach its objectives. Every day, the people crawled out of the wreckage and carried on. Later in WWII, the British and Americans had developed a formidable bomber fleet that bombed German cities around the clock and reduced them to rubble, with terrifying fire storms sucking victims in and leaving only ash. However, it all started with ruthless terror bombing by the Luftwaffe during the Spanish Civil War and then the Low Countries, France and Britain in 1940.

The Germans started with two fundamental weaknesses. One was the naive belief that they could bomb the hell out of their neighbours with total impunity. The second was that their bomber fleets were primarily designed to act as flying artillery in support of a rapidly advancing Panzer Army. They relied on terror and air superiority with twin engine medium bombers, dive bombers and ground attack aircraft. When they started to attack London they did not hold air superiority and they could not drop enough bombs in any one raid to destroy London. While London and its people were surviving, they were diverting Luftwaffe attention from winning the Battle of Britain and it has been remarked that London was worth a thousand Spitfires. As the bombing continued, London’s air defences steadily improved and the Germans could no longer launch large air raids. It did not stop the bombing but it meant that its intensity dropped and something closer to normal life returned.

The pain was not over because London was then attacked in the latter part of the war with cruise and ballistic missiles. This could have been a disaster, but the cruise missiles were slow enough to be shot down with AA artillery and fighter aircraft, including the first RAF jet fighters. Then the invasion at Normandy meant that Allied forces were advancing and liberating France and Belgium, denying the Germans cruise missile launch sites. The ballistic missiles were a greater threat because, once they had lifted off, nothing could stop them. The covert deception program using turned German agents was to provide some relief, the missiles still had targeting and other reliability issues, and the Allied bombing campaign reduced German production capabilities that dramatically reduced ricket production.

All through this, City of London and heart of Empire had to continue to function, damage had to be repaired, the vulnerable evacuated to safer areas, ship cargoes had to be unloaded, rationing of supplies managed and life had to continue. The author has described this process and the raw courage of Londoners. An absorbing and moving account with vivid supporting images through the body of the book.