Wooden Warship Construction, a History in Ship Models

As a former curator, the author knows his way around the outstanding collections of the National Maritime Museum. – This is a well researched, beautifully produced and impeccably illustrated work that will become a standard in its field – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Wooden Warship Construction, a History in Ship Models
FILE: R2543
AUTHOR: Brian Lavery
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  128
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Royal Navy, Napoleonic Wars, technology, naval architecture, 
wood working, model making, construction techniques, warships, marine 
engineering

ISBN: 978-1-4738-9480-8

IMAGE: B2543.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yu8jgxnuv
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: As a former curator, the author knows his way around 
the outstanding collections of the National Maritime Museum.  - This 
is a well researched, beautifully produced and impeccably 
illustrated work that will become a standard in its field  – 
Highly Recommended.

The author has written an impressive number of books on maritime 
history that have become classics in their field and a source of 
reference by other authors and film makers. This book fits nicely 
into his portfolio.

Ship models continue to be built, even in an age of 3D modelling 
and computer aided design. Before the age of computers there was 
no other way of providing a facsimile of a warship for instruction, 
sales and marketing, presentation and for the reference of 
shipbuilders. Many of these original models have survived in 
museums and provide a first class presentation of vessels that no 
longer exist. From these models it is possible to see how some 
technology served on for hundreds of years and which technology 
introduced a key advance in naval operations.

In much the same way, models of shipyards provide a view that 
cannot be achieved in any other way. Some were produced at the 
time and others are careful model reconstructions of shipyards 
that have since changed or disappeared.

The text is descriptive and the subject is reviewed in a logical 
manner that lays out all of the elements of construction of wooden 
sailing warships and their places of construction. To this is added 
lavish illustration of the finest quality, almost entirely in 
full colour.