West Malling, The RAF’s First Night Fighter Airfield, WWII To The Cold War

The RAF West Malling airfield started life as a private aerodrome in the 1930s, known as Kings Hill. This is a comprehensive history of an important RAF airfield in WWII and through the Cold War. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: West Malling, The RAF's First Night Fighter Airfield, WWII To The Cold War
FILE: R3075
AUTHOR: Anthony J Moor
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, Air World
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Fighter Command, 
fighter station, grass field aerodrome, Spitfires, Battle of Britain, night fighters, jet 
fighters, Hunters, F-84, Meteors, US Navy Facilities Flight

ISBN: 1-52675-323-5

PAGES: 439
IMAGE: B3075.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ykxym8yp
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The RAF West Malling airfield started life as a private aerodrome in 
the 1930s, known as Kings Hill. This is a comprehensive history of an important 
RAF airfield in WWII and through  the Cold War. –  Highly Recommended.

The private airfield that was taken over by the RAF was renamed RAF West Malling 
but still had a grass strip, improved by laying wire mess over the grass and building a 
concrete perimeter track. It was not until June 1940 that a concrete runway was built 
as the Battle of Britain got underway and the first aircraft arrived. It was one of a 
number of RAF airfields that were rapidly brought into operation and was designated 
as the first night fighter base protecting London and the South East. As the tide of war 
turned, the airfield was also home to day fighters heading off on fighter sweeps over 
France and then as a home for fighters defending against the V1 Flying Bombs.

The author has provided a very detailed history that reads well and gives a good 
account of the changing fortunes of the airfield after 1945 as it became a Cold War 
base. There are a great many illustrations through the body of the book in support of 
able text. The author has continued the story into the declining years of the airfield.

Of particular interest to all those who served at RAF West Malling, and to those 
living in the area, this is also an important book for aviation enthusiasts, covering the 
still poorly documented Cold War era.