Wellington’s Command, A Reappraisal of his Generalship in the Peninsula and At Waterloo

The author has challenged some of the myths and legends of Wellington and the uncritical accounts that have been published. The choice of Wellington to command was not overwhelmingly supported by Horseguards, but his victories placed him in a category of his own during the Napoleonic Wars – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Wellington's Command, A Reappraisal of his Generalship in the Peninsula 
and At Waterloo
FILE: R3064
AUTHOR: G E Jaycock
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.0                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Europe, Iberian Peninsula, Portugal, Spain, French Armies, Marshals of 
France, Wellesley, Lord Wellington, Peninsula Campaigns, invasion of France, 
Napoleon, Waterloo, Allied Armies

ISBN: 1-52673-353-6

PAGES: 248
IMAGE: B3064.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yjr3vrld
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The author has challenged some of the myths and legends of 
Wellington and the uncritical accounts that have been published. The choice of 
Wellington to command was not overwhelmingly supported by Horseguards, but 
his victories placed him in a category of his own during the Napoleonic Wars – 
Highly Recommended.

The rise of Wellington in many respects ran against the traditional practices of 
Horseguards. Some undoubtedly expected him to fail in Portugal and he was certainly 
opposed by a much larger enemy force of seasoned French troops. The British force 
included many criminals, given a choice of hanging or taking the King's Shilling. 
Wellington himself remarked several times that he was not sure what his men did to 
the French, but they terrified him. Against all the odds, he welded together his mixed 
force of British and Portuguese troops and fought a brilliant campaign against the 
French, where he managed to keep the French Armies separated, avoiding defeat by a 
very much larger enemy.

At Waterloo, Wellington was not the first choice for commander in chief, many 
suggesting the Prince of Orange be given the position, but Wellington won out and 
again managed to weld together a collection of Allies. As in Portugal, he also walked 
the ground and chose the point of battle, drawing information from agents and 
reconnaissance patrols.

The author has presented a well-researched and reasoned review of Wellington the 
commander. Some may question assertions that challenge previous wisdom but the 
author has presented his proofs and reasoning convincingly. There is a modest by 
helpful photo-plate section in support of the text.