Wartime Service in the Small Scale Raiding Force and SOE, Confessions of a Special Agent

The story of Jack Evans as he told it to Ernest Dudley was first published in 1957, lifting a corner on the world of special forces and the SOE. The story is recounted engagingly and sets out a world of intelligence that is still little known – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Wartime Service in the Small Scale Raiding Force and SOE, Confessions of 
a Special Agent
FILE: R2953
AUTHOR: Jack Evans, Ernest Dudley
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, frontline
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 162
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, 
special forces, commando raids, SOE, spies, saboteurs, intelligent officers, French 
Resistance

ISBN: 1-52673-994-1

IMAGE: B2953.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yy8lblcf
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The story of Jack Evans as he told it to Ernest Dudley was first 
published in 1957, lifting a corner on the world of special forces and the SOE. The 
story is recounted engagingly and sets out a world of intelligence that is still little 
known –   Most Highly Recommended.

Unusually for a modern military history, this book lacks illustration but the tale is so 
nicely presented that it reads more like a novel and paints vivid pictures in words. It 
conveys the spirit of those who joined special forces and intelligent units after the 
evacuation of the BEF from Dunkirk. They found themselves in a chaotic and often 
badly prepared environment because this was a learning exercise for everyone 
involved. Britain already had intelligence services that were formed before the Great 
War and traced their heritage back at least to the time of Elizabeth I. They had a 
somewhat tempestuous relationship to the new organizations that sprang up under 
encouragement from Winston Churchill. It would have been human to look on the 
new units as novices and amateurs, but the new organizations did not help themselves 
in presenting a more efficient image.

The Commandos became a recognizable force although there were effectively two 
organizations, the Royal Marines adapting centuries of experience in launching small 
raiding parties at an enemy shore. The Army also formed its own commando force 
and there were an unknown number of special forces in addition. The Long Range 
Desert Group and the SAS have become relatively well known, but there were many 
others, some forming for a single operation and enjoying some autonomy from all 
the other forces. One little known organization was the Small Scale Raiding Force 
and although the SOE may appear well known much of its story has remained hidden 
by deliberate actions.

In recounting his story, the Evans has lifted the corner of a largely unknown history. 
The experience of training and deployment provide a very unique source of 
information and the real surprise is that this book was published as long ago as 1957, 
when much of this part of WWII history was still sealed as classified material, and 
that it is only now that it has been made available in this new edition.