Warships After Washington, The Development of the Five Major Fleets 1922-1930

The Washington Treaty attempted much but delivered poorly. 
However, it introduced some very creative ways of designing 
and building warships to maximise permitted tonnage. The author 
has produced a comprehensive review of the Washington Treaty's 
impact on naval fleet development between the two World Wars. 
Most highly recommended.

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NAME: Warships After Washington, The Development of the Five Major 
Fleets 1922-1930
FILE: R2383
AUTHOR:  John Jordan
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  338
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Naval architecture, international agreement, five fleets, 
Royal Navy, arms control, cheating, standards, tonnage, regulation
ISBN: 978-1-47385-273-0
IMAGE: B2383.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hhqjwqz
LINKS: Current Discount Offers http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/sale 
DESCRIPTION: The Washington Treaty attempted much but delivered 
poorly. However, it introduced some very creative ways of designing 
and building warships to maximise permitted tonnage. The author has 
produced a comprehensive review of the Washington Treaty's impact on 
naval fleet development between the two World Wars. 
Most highly recommended.

The broadest outlines of the Washington Treaty will be familiar to 
most naval enthusiasts, if not to the general public. Some of the 
detail will also be known. For example, anyone with an interest in 
naval design and naval aviation will know that HMS Ark Royal (III) 
was a very creative way of squeezing another carrier into the Fleet. 
The efforts to compress a carrier design without losing 
effectiveness was then applied to larger carriers very profitably. 
HMS Nelson and HMS Rodney were equally creative designs that 
departed from established RN battleship format and permitted 
up-gunning to 16 inch main armament.

The author has reviewed the implications of the Treaty as well as 
reviewing the classes of Treaty warship for the five major navies. 
The very clear text is enhanced by many photographs and drawings 
through the body of the book. This will make this new book one of 
the reference standards for naval enthusiasts and very helpful to 
those who are not enthusiasts, or perhaps not even knowledgable 
about naval matters, in understanding the far-reaching effect of 
the Treaty on international relations and on WWII.

The Washington Treaty was followed by the Geneva Conference in 
1927 and the London Treaty. As with many attempts at arms control, 
this process had as much a desire to spend 'peace' dividends that 
were never there to spend. There will always be strong argument 
between the various factions for and against such an exercise. 
However, the end result is a great deal of cheating by all concerned 
as nations attempted to win an advantage.