Voices from the Past, The Wooden Horse of Gallipoli, The Heroic Saga of SS River Clyde, a WWI Icon, Told Through the Accounts of Those Who Were There

The Voices from the Past series has set new standards for history records. The selection of eye witness accounts has been impeccable and they have been reproduced, with sensitive editing, into a seamless and compelling account of courage, tragedy and the tumult of war – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Voices from the Past, The Wooden Horse of Gallipoli, The 
Heroic Saga of SS River Clyde, a WWI Icon, Told Through the Accounts 
of Those Who Were There
FILE: R2525
AUTHOR: Stephen Snelling
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Frontline
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  408
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War I, WWI, World War 1, First World War, The Great 
War, Gallipoli, Turkey, Dardanelles, Sedd-el-BBahr, Cape Helles, 
amphibious warfare, landings

ISBN: 978-1-84832-852-5

IMAGE: B2525.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/lv3d7mu
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Voices from the Past series has set new standards 
for history records. The selection of eye witness accounts has been 
impeccable and they have been reproduced, with sensitive editing, 
into a seamless and compelling account of courage, tragedy and the 
tumult of war – Most Highly Recommended.

The landings in Gallipoli followed a very successful naval incursion 
into Turkish waters. The campaign has been dismissed roundly as a 
costly failure, where Winston Churchill resigned from the Admiralty 
and joined a regiment on the Western Front as a Colonel. However, 
the risks were worth it at that point in the war and the Royal 
Navy's reconnaissance in force demonstrated that there was a 
potential opportunity to take Turkey out of the war and link up on 
land with the Russians. It was probably the best opportunity at 
that stage of breaking the horrible stalemate of the Western Front 
and its trench warfare. That does of course raise questions about 
the odds for success, better than a rank outsider, but a very long 
way from being a short odds cert.

In war, the innovative exploitation of a potential enemy weakness 
is always risky. There may not be adequate intelligence to fully 
assess the enemy's chances for withstanding the attack. That was 
one weakness in the Gallipoli Campaign. There is always the 
question of resources being able to match and maintain a match 
against an enemy. Then there is the special risk of a landing from 
the sea onto a hostile shore, where a well dug-in enemy is several 
times stronger than the landing force for the same number of guns 
and men. Once committed, the landing must be pressed with 
determination and enthusiasm. If that succeeds in establishing a 
bridgehead. The commander has to get his troops off the beach and 
as far inland as possible. If resources, determination, courage and 
good generalship make that possible, the invaders must build up 
their momentum and rapidly reach the point where they are on equal 
terms with the enemy, forcing a retreat into a rout. The Gallipoli 
landings succeeded in establishing a viable beachhead, but failed 
to breakout and develop winning momentum. As soon as that is 
understood, a hard decision must be taken of either committing more 
resources, or withdrawing. Gallipoli saw both the addition of 
resources and, eventually, a withdrawal from the beaches. The real 
questions are whether sufficient resources were committed and 
whether the decision to withdraw was made in a timely manner. 
Gallipoli saw insufficient resources being available and command 
failures to recognise the situation and bite the bullet by ordering 
a withdrawal. It is always much easier to make decisions from the 
comfort of a chair and with decades of hindsight.

Whatever the view of the campaign, there can be no question about 
the courage of those involved on the ground and in the water. Also 
courage in the air was demonstrated, with one RNAS float plane 
unable to get airborne in time, firing its torpedo at a Turkish ship 
whilst still taxying in the water and sinking the enemy. The events 
involving the SS River Clyde were a graphic example of extreme 
courage under fire that was to result in the award of the Victoria 
cross and other medals.

The words of those who were there are clear and graphic, even a 
century later. This book provides inspiration, horror, courage, 
determination beyond anything that could be expected, comradeship 
and sheer bloody guts. If many of these parts of the story were 
included in a novel, the reader might find difficulty in believing 
the account, but this is real life, it happened, and the reader will 
never view the Gallipoli Campaign the same way again. As a military 
campaign it failed, but as a Commonwealth enterprise in courage it 
was an enduring success.