Voices from the Past – Britain’s Wartime Evacuees, The People, Places and Stories of the Evacuations Told Through the Accounts of Those Who Were There

World War 2 was the first war to include the widespread deliberate targeting of civilians, and particularly of children, anywhere in accessible enemy territory. Millions were evacuated from British cities to the greater safety of the countryside and the more remote areas. This large scale movement of people is reviewed in this study, using the voices of those who were there. Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Voices from the Past – Britain's Wartime Evacuees, The People, 
Places and Stories of the Evacuations Told Through the Accounts of 
Those Who Were There
FILE: R2438
AUTHOR:  Gillian Mawson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  214
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War Two, Second World War, Home 
Front, total war, civilians, children, terror bombing, place of safety
ISBN: 978-1-84832-441-1
IMAGE: B2438.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/zgnl9fn
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: World War 2 was the first war to include the widespread 
deliberate targeting of civilians, and particularly of children, 
anywhere in accessible enemy territory. Millions were evacuated from 
British cities to the greater safety of the countryside and the more 
remote areas. This large scale movement of people  is reviewed in 
this study, using the voices of those who were there. 
Highly Recommended. 

In 1939, Britain braced for a German terror campaign on a 
significantly greater scale than the use of terror bombing by Germany 
in WWI. The added dimension was an expectation that the Nazis would 
use poison gas. The only reason that the Germans did not employ poison 
gas was a fear of the retaliation by Britain with the same weapons. 
It was a justified fear because Britain responded directly to German 
bombs by carrying out attacks with more planes and bigger bombs on 
German cities in retaliation for the German blitz attacks on Britain. 
Poison gas was only used in the concentration camps where German 
prisoners were unable to retaliate in kind.

The huge movement of people out of the most vulnerable areas is 
difficult to comprehend today. It was a planned and orderly process 
that saw thousands of unaccompanied children sent by train and bus to 
rural and remote urban areas to live with total strangers. There were 
also children who relocated with their mothers or some other non-
combatant relative. The movement was not just within the UK. Some 
children with or without accompanying adults made the perilous 
journey by sea to Canada, South Africa and other distant locations of 
the Empire. In the process, some were lost when their ships were sunk 
by U-boats.

The author has provided the most comprehensive study of this process 
of wartime migration that has been attempted to date. The book may 
well become the definitive work on the subject. The personal 
recollections collected provide a wide selection of experiences that 
are sad, happy, but also moving.