VC10 Icon of the Skies, BOAC, Boeing and a Jet Age Battle

British flag carrier BOAC, later BA, effectively and deliberately sabotaged the commercial success of the VC10 because it wanted to buy Boeing airliners. The author has provided an excellent account of the political battles and the commercial skulduggery, the impressive service of the VC10s with those airlines that had the wisdom to buy it, and its outstanding service as a transport and tanker with the RAF. Much Recommended.


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NAME: VC10 Icon of the Skies, BOAC, Boeing and a Jet Age Battle
FILE: R2479
AUTHOR: Lance Cole
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  224
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Jet liners, commercial aircraft, commercial competition, air 
lines, Boeing, BOAC, RAF, military transport, aerial tanker

ISBN: 1-47387-532-3

IMAGE: B2479.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/mnjybgt
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: British flag carrier BOAC, later BA, effectively and 
deliberately sabotaged the commercial success of the VC10 because it 
wanted to buy Boeing airliners. The author has provided an excellent 
account of the political battles and the commercial skulduggery, the 
impressive service of the VC10s with those airlines that had the wisdom 
to buy it, and its outstanding service as a transport and tanker with 
the RAF. Much Recommended. 

The VC10 had the misfortune to see life during a period when British 
politicians saw their task of managing a rapid decline of Great Britain 
and a hope of giving it away to any other country that might want to 
acquire it in a fire sale. British flag carrier BOAC was fully signed 
up to the concept of doing Britain down and actively conspired to add 
requirements to the specification, under the deceit that this would 
allow them to place large and early orders for the VC10, with the 
intention of making the aircraft look uncompetitive with the Boeing 
alternative.

In spite of all the political machinations, the VC10 was built, 
served with distinction in civil and military roles, and was much 
loved by its air crew. It was also widely regarded as the most 
beautiful airliner of its time, out shone only by the superlative 
Concorde that was later designed and built by the team that was 
responsible for the VC10.

BOAC had added in requirements to operate from high and hot airstrips 
of limited  length. A requirement the Boeing alternative was never 
designed for and required later modification to operate from those 
runways that had been enhanced to reduce the full need demanded of 
airliners. However, this was to make the VC10 and the Super VC10 ideal 
for operation in Africa and ideal for military use. As a result, the 
VC10 became a very successful aircraft for the growing African airlines.

The RAF appreciated the qualities of the aircraft and those of its 
pilots who had also had experience flying jet fighters often remarked 
that it handled like a fighter, giving great response and agility. In 
RAF service, the VC10 was an outstanding trooper and freighter. Then 
being modified to serve as a aerial refuelling tanker, a role it also 
performed with distinction.

The able text is fully supported by a very good photo-plate section.