Under the Devil’s Eye, The British Military Experience in Macedonia 1915-1918

The authors have addressed one of the great omissions by historians covering WWI. This is a well-researched study of a subject that has received far less than its deserved attention. The photo-plate section is well selected and maps in the body of the book help in the understanding of this unfamiliar part of WWI – Very Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Under the Devil's Eye, The British Military Experience in 
Macedonia 1915-1918
FILE: R2572
AUTHOR: Alan Wakefield, Simon Moody
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  264
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War1, First World War, The Great 
War, Europe, Balkans, Mediterranean, Turkey, Macedonia, Greece, 
Serbians, Bulgarians, Russia

ISBN: 1-47389-03-6

IMAGE: B2572.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybhk65ag
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The authors have addressed one of the great omissions 
by historians covering WWI.  This is a well-researched study of a 
subject that has received far less than its deserved attention. The 
photo-plate section is well selected and maps in the body of the book 
help in the understanding of this unfamiliar part of WWI – Very 
Highly Recommended.

Historians have largely ignored the campaigns and battles of WWI that 
were fought in the Mediterranean, Italy, the Balkans and in the 
Middle East. Gallipoli has received some attention, although even 
here the coverage is rather less than the campaign merited. Lawrence 
of Arabia has perhaps received more coverage than merited, certainly 
at the time, thanks the services of a journalist who created the 
legend. All of the other actions are almost airbrushed from history, 
even though they had an important impact at the time and have 
continued to crop up during the last hundred years as the 
consequences of not giving the area the attention it deserved 
politically.

The carnage on the Western Front was so enormous that it has blotted 
out most of the other areas of combat during WWI. The preoccupation 
with defeating Germany relegated Austria and Turkey to minor 
footnotes, even though they saw some of the most energetic actions of 
the war. Similarly little attention has been paid to Africa, were a 
small German force caused the British so much inconvenience.

The authors had worked hard to research and present a theatre of war 
that has much of interest. Normally, reviewing WWI histories prompts 
a reviewer to comment on the fresh insights or lack thereof. In the 
case of this new and enticing book, it offers fresh insight because 
there has been virtually no previous insight offered by historians, 
other than in previous editions of this work. The first edition was 
published by Sutton, at a time when that respected publisher was 
going through a series of changes and may not have focussed enough 
resource to promoting this book. It is almost as strange that this 
book has not prompted other historians to action, as it is that the 
subject was previously ignored. Usually, when a book of this quality 
emerges, it interests other historians who look for what may have 
been missed by the pioneering text. In this case, it seems that 
historians have treated the book as a definitive history of its 
subject and simply acquired copies to complete an area missing in 
their libraries.

It is certainly a book that historians and enthusiasts should not 
miss.