U-Boat Ace, The Story of Wolfgang Luth

Wolfgang Luth was an exceptional submarine commander, second highest scoring U-Boat Ace of WWII. Luth operated in almost every theatre of the naval war and was one of only seven German military personnel to be awarded the Knight’s Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords, and Diamonds – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: U-Boat Ace, The Story of Wolfgang Luth
FILE: R2678
AUTHOR: Jordan Vauce
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Greenhill Books
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  233
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War Two, Second World War, World War 2, wolf 
pack, submarines, U-Boats, Battle of the Atlantic, high scoring, 
tonnage sunk, Norway, Indian Ocean

ISBN: 1-78438-274-4

IMAGE: B2678.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7l3vps4
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Wolfgang Luth was an exceptional submarine commander, 
second highest scoring U-Boat Ace of WWII. Luth operated in almost 
every theatre of the naval war and was one of only seven German 
military personnel to be awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves, 
Swords, and Diamonds – Most Highly Recommended.

The author has produced an impeccably researched and very well-
written biography. He has presented a credible portrait of an 
outstanding submarine commander who was not only the second highest 
scoring Ace, but also survived the war in a service that suffered 
horrendous casualties in a battle of attrition to rival that fought 
by British, Commonwealth and US bomber crews in their battle in the 
skies over Germany.

Luth was born in Riga, joined the Kreigsmarine in 1935, and was well 
on his way to command a U-Boat as the first steps to war had been 
taken.

At the start of WWII, the U-Boat service had very few boats in 
service and many of these were the small Type II coastal boats. 
The Type VII became the backbone of the service through WWII, with 
the larger Type IX providing the reach to get into the South 
Atlantic. These boats were all based on WWI designs and were really 
submersible torpedo boats that spent most of their time on the 
surface, frequently engaging targets with guns rather than their 
torpedoes. As the RN increased their carrier strength with escort 
carriers, and the RAF began to re-equip Coastal Command with modern 
aircraft, it became dangerous for a U-Boat to travel on the surface. 
Many commanders trimmed their craft so that the decks were awash, 
reducing the time required to crash dive. Rather than remove deck 
guns, the Kreigsmarine simply added more anti-aircraft guns and 
radar warning receivers which did little to combat maritime patrol 
and attack aircraft and carrier-based fighters and bombers, but 
added to the drag when submerged, reducing performance further and 
increasing under water noise. Snorkel breathing masts did enable 
boats to run with just the snorkel and a periscope above the water, 
but continued to keep the boat at walking pace. For those U-Boats 
operating in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean, as commanded by 
Luth, some were equipped with gyro kites to increase the visual 
horizon, reducing the risks of the boat being surprised on the 
surface, and allowing a better search for potential targets in 
what were large open oceans.

Luth served through this period and survived, which was in itself 
no mean achievement. Many of his fellow Aces were killed or captured.

The author has told the story well and based it on thorough research, 
this being a revised edition of a book first published in 1990 by 
the Naval Institute Press. The engaging text is fully supported by 
a fine selection of images reproduced through the body of the book.