The Wreck Hunter, Battle of Britain & the Blitz

This biography of wreck hunter Terry Parsons provides an absorbing insight into the archaeology of WWII aircraft wrecks. The able text is supported by exclusive photography and is created from original notes recorded by Terry Parsons. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The Wreck Hunter, Battle of Britain & the Blitz
FILE: R3125
AUTHOR: Melody Foreman
PUBLISHER: frontline books, Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, air war, medium 
bombers, multi-role aircraft, light bombers, Army co-operation, ground attack, 
fighters, fighter bombers, interdiction, wrecks. Wreck hunters, archaeology

ISBN: 1-52671-258-X

PAGES: 214
IMAGE: B3125.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/tqgfzeo
DESCRIPTION: This biography of wreck hunter Terry Parsons provides an absorbing 
insight into the archaeology of WWII aircraft wrecks. The able text is supported by 
exclusive photography and is created from original notes recorded by Terry 
Parsons. – Most Highly Recommended.

The archaeologist has revolutionized the process of building history. Although we 
often look down on oral history, much of what has become accepted as true and 
accurate written history is no better than second hand information. Often it is 
recorded many years after an event and coloured by the prejudices of the writer or 
the writer's patron. When the camera was used from the American Civil War we 
might have assumed that all had changed dramatically, an increasing volume of 
photographic images, and then film and video, is assumed by many to have placed 
history on an unshakeable foundation. This is not an entirely firm assumption. Even 
modern war, with embedded journalists and photojournalists, mountains of official 
documents, and interviews recorded with those involved in the events, still leaves 
much ambiguous information and large gaps where nothing is recorded. The growing 
use of photographic and video imaging does close off many areas of building history 
from 'interpretation' by historians, but it also misleads or simply misses action.

Archaeology has been steadily filling the gaps in knowledge and questioning many 
aspects of accepted history, however or whenever it was recorded. This enthralling 
biography demonstrates how much the work of archaeologists has been contributing 
to military history from as recently as 75 years ago and the last of those who 
participated in events die and the memories of some of the last survivors dim before 
they can be recorded and compared with other memories.

Those searching for WWII aircraft wrecks to provide an archaeological record of one 
of the major air battles of history face challenges that archaeologists working on more 
ancient sites do not. One delicate area in working WWII wreck sites is that the 
remains of the pilot or crew may still be present and close relatives of the dead may 
still be alive. The site is therefore a war grave with all of the sensitivities that this 
involves. The other factor is that when aircraft crashed, they became buried with their 
ammunition and bombs which are still very much alive. Then, the archaeologist has 
all the normal constraints in preserving history. A further unique factor is that the air 
Battle for Britain covered most of the British Isles and although we may formally 
regard the Battle of Britain as being conducted in the Summer of 1940, almost entirely 
in the south east of England, it continued until the last V1 and V2 impacted and the 
last German aircraft was removed from the skies.