The Wars of Alexander’s Successors, 323-281 BC, Volume I: Commanders & Campaigns

The first of two volumes resulting from over a decade of collaborative research work. This provides an absorbing narrative of the wars that were fought by Alexander’s successors from the time of his death to the Battle of Corupedium – Highly Recommended

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NAME: The Wars of Alexander's Successors, 323-281 BC, Volume I: Commanders 
& Campaigns
FILE: R2979
AUTHOR: Bob Bennett, Mike Roberts
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PAGES: 236
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Alexander the Great, Antigonos, Demetrius, Seleucus, Ptolemy, Battle 
of Corupedium, Diadochi

ISBN: 1-52676-074-6

IMAGE: B2979.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y59g9aua
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The first of two volumes resulting from over a decade of 
collaborative research work. This provides an absorbing narrative of the wars 
that were fought by Alexander's successors from the time of his death to the 
Battle of Corupedium –   Highly Recommended

Classical scholars devote lifetimes to the fascinating study of the Hellenistic Age, 
but many millions are aware of parts of this history. What is universally known is 
the story of Alexander, a brilliant commander who conquered the known world, but 
died suddenly and young. What preceded him and what followed is frequently a 
complete mystery, such was the impact his action had on building an enduring tale 
of myth and mystery. The authors have provided an illuminating account of how his 
successors handled his heritage from 323-281 BC.

Greece had developed a collection of city states that operated autonomously and 
often wage war on each other. Alexander built what was in effect a nation by 
drawing from the people of Greece an army that was to defeat all before it in an 
amazingly short time. When he died he left no clear successor and, fact or fiction, 
stated on his deathbed that his successor would be the strongest from amongst his 
generals and governors. Whether the words are accurately attributed or not, his 
death was followed by a long series of struggles between these men. None was to 
demonstrate the qualities that had made Alexander a legend. Of the many millions 
who have heard of Alexander, very few have heard of any of his successors, or 
known anything of their actions and achievements. The possible exception is 
Ptolemy, not for himself, but for Cleopatra, the end of the Pharaonic line that he 
founded to rule Egypt. The irony being that those who know something of the line 
he founded know them as Egyptians and not as Greek successors to Alexander.

This book reads well and presents unique insight into the succession. The readable 
text is illustrated by a supporting photo-plate section.