The United Kingdom, The Unification & Disintegration of Britain Since AD 43

A book that is thoroughly researched and written for accessibility, serving academics and post-graduates but readable for the general public. The story of the United Kingdom is a mixture of myth, mystery and fact. This book provides a fact-based appraisal – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The United Kingdom, The Unification & Disintegration of Britain Since 
AD 43
FILE: R2959
AUTHOR: John D Grainger
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Roman occupation, Celt wars, Saxon wars, Viking invasion, unity under 
Knut, Medieval wars between England, Scotland Wales and Ireland, Tudor wars, 
Union of Crowns, Union of Parliament, botched devolution

ISBN: 1-52674-819-3

IMAGE: B2959.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yyj43mfp
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A book that is thoroughly researched and written for accessibility, 
serving academics and post-graduates but readable for the general public. The story 
of the United Kingdom is a mixture of myth, mystery and fact. This book 
provides a fact-based appraisal  –   Very Highly Recommended.

The British Isles have been inhabited since before the last Ice Age, although it is 
unclear how much of the population was settled and how much was migratory. As 
the ice retreated, it severed the land bridge to Europe and the North Sea inundated 
the land. From that point it can be assumed that the British Isles were settled on a 
permanent basis, although periodically a new wave of immigrants arrived, producing
 a patchwork quilt of people that the Romans discovered when they invaded. The 
Romans can be considered the creators of a United Kingdom in that they built roads 
and settlements with protecting forts even across Scotland, before deciding that 
Scotland was not worth the effort of including it in their administration of Britain. 
When the Romans left, the British Isles became a patchwork of individual kingdoms
frequently at war with each other and with new waves and raiders and migrants.

England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland may have been separate countries for much of 
the time after the Romans left, but each was internally divided to the point where 
Norwich, then the second city of Medieval England, was at war with Great Yarmouth 
and the men of Great Yarmouth fought the men of Gorleston even into the 19th 
Century. The English invaded Wales and built fortresses around that country to 
maintain their rule and periodically controlled Scotland. Ireland was also periodically 
ruled by England. The point where formal union was established was at the 
beginning of the 17th Century when a childless Elizabeth Tudor died and the English 
Crown passed to James VI of Scotland who moved South to rule from London. 
However, Scotland retained its own legal system and Parliament. Then many Scots 
were near bankruptcy when the Belize Bubble burst and they lost their investments. 
This prompted them to look for deep pockets to dip into and they asked for a union 
of Parliaments in return for being able to dip into English money, a practice which 
has continued ever since.

The administration of Blair and Brown flirted with devolution in the hope of shoring 
up the Labour vote in Wales and Scotland on the eve of the 21st Century. Their 
botched plans have created a serious mess that has left no one satisfied. What 
remains to be seen is what happens if Britain breaks free of the European Union and 
becomes a sovereign nation against. The probability is that this will strengthen the 
Union as part of root and branch constitutional reform and a new aggressive trading 
stance to go out into the world once more. If Britain fails to exit the EU, it then faces 
either colonization with European Commission Reich Protectors administering four 
colonies created by vertically slicing the British Isles into four pieces, or return as an 
EU Member and be cut into four pieces that are then glued onto other inconvenient 
parts of the EU to destroy national identities.

The author has worked through the twists and turns of the history of the United 
Kingdom, dispelling some of the myths and misunderstandings along the way.