The Two Battles of Copenhagen 1801 and 1807, Britain & Denmark in the Napoleonic Wars

The Royal Navy activity in the Baltic and its approaches were vital to Britain but have received remarkably little attention from historians. This new book offers a well researched and argued review of the two Battles of Copenhagen that, if lost would have cost Britain dear. – Highly Recommended


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NAME: The Two Battles of Copenhagen 1801 and 1807, Britain & Denmark in the 
Napoleonic Wars
FILE: R2734
AUTHOR: Gareth Glover
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 285
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Napoleonic Wars, Scandinavia, Royal Navy, Danish Navy, Baltic Trade, 
British Trade, sea power, tactical warfare, strategic warfare

ISBN: 1-47389-831-5

IMAGE: B2734.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybw2bonk
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The Royal Navy activity in the Baltic and its approaches were 
vital to Britain but have received remarkably little attention from historians.  
This new book offers a well researched and argued review of the two Battles of 
Copenhagen that, if lost would have cost Britain dear. - Highly Recommended

Recently, the finest account of the second Battle of Copenhagen appeared in a novel "Inferno" by Julian Stockwin. 
Accounts have also appeared of the first Battle of Copenhagen over the years, primarily as part of the 
reviews of Nelson. This book offers welcome balance, providing a very readable review of the fight and 
the importance to Britain of maintaining its Baltic trade.

From the Middle Ages, Baltic trade was very important to the British Isles. Fur, timber, spices and other 
natural products were brought to Britain and the products of British textile and machinery output were 
shipped to the States around the Baltic. By 1807, Napoleon had attempted a customs blockade to choke 
off British trade to Continental Europe and Britain's only remaining ally was Sweden under a King who 
was unpredictable and claimed by some to be mad. Had Napoleon invaded and occupied Denmark, taking 
control of the powerful Danish Fleet, the access for the British merchant ships to the Baltic would have 
been closed. Napoleon had already given proof that his ambitions would not prevent him from violating 
neutrality, but the British Government was more sensitive to the issues. However, vital British interests 
demanded that the Danish Fleet be taken out of the equation even if this meant invasion of a neutral 
country, a challenge that was to face Churchill in 1940 when the collapse of France presented the real 
danger of the French Fleet based in North Africa being taken over by the Germans.

The British Government attempted diplomacy with the Danes but when they refused to surrender control 
of their fleet, the Royal Navy went to war and took control of Danish ships with an invasion of Denmark, 
followed by a withdrawal once the threat had been neutralized. Whether the Danes would have allowed an 
invading French Army to take the country and its Fleet remains arguable as it was later in the case of the 
French North African Fleet.

The author has provided an in-depth review of Anglo-Danish relations through the Napoleonic Wars. He
 has used previously unpublished information from primary sources and full colour plates of images,
 previously unseen before in Britain, to present a pioneering work that demands to be read.