The True Story of the Great Escape, Stalag Luft III, March 1944

The books being launched this year on the 75th anniversary of the Great Escape have been of a very high standard, providing a challenge for readers who cannot afford all of them. This new book has been carefully researched and has to be a front runner for all readers but, from those books we have reviewed this year, each has unique insight and an enthusiast will want to buy them all – Highly Recommended


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NAME: The True Story of the Great Escape, Stalag Luft III, March 1944
FILE: R2838
AUTHOR: Jonathan F Vance
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Greenhill Books
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 368
PRICE: £9.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: World War II, World War Two, World War 2, Second World War, 
POW escapes, German POW camps, The Great Escape, war crimes, downed 
airmen

ISBN: 978-1-78438-438-8

IMAGE: B2838.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y267vmyc
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   The books being launched this year on the 75th anniversary 
of the Great Escape have been of a very high standard, providing a challenge 
for readers who cannot afford all of them. This new book has been carefully 
researched and has to be a front runner for all readers but, from those books 
we have reviewed this year, each has unique insight and an enthusiast will 
want to buy them all - Highly Recommended

Stalag Luft III is immortal because of the Great Escape where 76 POWs made it 
outside the wire, only three made successful home runs, 50 were murdered by the 
Gestapo, and the escape caused turmoil inside Germany. However, there were many 
camps and each of them had enthusiastic would be escapers, so that Stalag Luft III 
stands for itself and for all of them.

The author tells the amazing story as a classic tale of a battle of wits between 
prisoners and those guarding them. This is a comprehensive account of the building 
of the tunnels, life within the camp, daring, courage, determination and comradeship. 
The author has also captured the humour and the spirit of the prisoners and the 
mixture of sport and serious endeavour.

Serious research and balance are keynotes of this book. It is well-written and it does 
have a modest photo-plate section but, although it is always nice to have more 
illustration, the excellent Pen and Sword Images of War volume covering Stalag 
Luft III provides so many rare photographs no reader can feel a lack of illustration 
in any of the histories of the camp. The economics of publishing always place 
pressure on the amount of illustration for a thorough history book