The Sniper Encyclopedia, An A-Z Guide To The World Sniping

A thorough encyclopedic study of the world of the sniper. This new book contains many illustrations and biographies in an alphabetically staged work. – Very Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: The Sniper Encyclopedia, An A-Z Guide To The World Sniping
FILE: R2865
AUTHOR: John Walter
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Greenhill Books
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 306
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Sniper, long range shooting, the rifle, ammunition, sniper teams, 
technology, sights, sighting, range finding, deployment

ISBN: 1-78438-240-X

IMAGE: B2865.jpg

BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2r77jcv
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A thorough encyclopedic study of the world of the sniper. This new 
book contains many illustrations and biographies in an alphabetically staged 
work. –   Very Highly Recommended

The sniper is not a new part of warfare but has expanded significantly during the last 
hundred years. The sword and spear are short range weapons that for much of history 
have been the main weapons of war on the field of battle. The bow may have been 
around for centuries but is not ideally suited in its most popular forms to the stealthy 
craft of the sniper. The exception has been the crossbow because it has not required 
the shooter to stand to fire, or required the tension on muscles that the other forms of 
bow demand if the shooter is to to take careful aim and hold until the target has come 
into the most favourable position. Perhaps the bow with the most potential has been 
the pocket crossbow which was banned by Papal Bull in language that could have 
described nuclear weapons. At the time of its Medieval introduction, it posed a major 
threat to the Establishment of the time, allowing a shooter to fire from concealment or 
to carry it close to the target without being observed. However, the sniper really 
became effective with the development of firearms.

The exact first use of a firearm by a sniper is not known. Certainly, the Scottish figure 
James the Bastard was mortally wounded by a sniper ambushing him with a hackbut in 
the latter part of the Sixteenth Century. This was a smooth bore long arm firing a stone 
ball. It allowed the sniper to chose a position and wait for the target to come into 
range. It may not have been the first attempt, successful or otherwise of the 
employment of a sniper to take out a target at a distance from a point of concealment.

The first sniper rifle to be used in any quantity was the British Baker rifle that was 
easily able to take out distant targets that were beyond the range of the standard 
infantry gun, the musket. The Baker rifle has been credited with effective fire to 200 
yards, where the musket was struggling to achieve aimed fire beyond 50 yards. There 
have also been claims of snipers taking down targets out to 300 yards, a huge 
improvement in firearms capability.

This book demonstrates great care in research with 750 standard entries. The format 
is alphabetic, making it very easy to navigate as a reference work. There are more 
than 200 illustrations, mostly in full colour.

From the Napoleonic Wars and the Baker rifle, sniping has become increasingly 
important in warfare. Where the British Rifles were used alongside traditional 
infantry units, they were teams of soldiers, specially chosen and used in teams ahead 
of the main regiments and where their common role was to target enemy officers and 
NCOs to destroy command and control of line regiments. By WWI, the sniper was 
often solitary, a patient shooter waiting for a target of opportunity in the enemy trench 
lines. By WWII, the Germans and Soviets depended on snipers at Leningrad and 
Stalingrad with individuals and small teams taking out many enemy soldiers. Snipers 
became increasingly important in all the other forces deployed in WWII. Today 
snipers frequently operate in pairs and the distance to target continues to increase. 
The spotter provides critical information to the sniper, such as range and wind 
conditions, and also watches the shooter's back. This means that a modern sniper 
may be taking down a target at more than a kilometre and may have to wait for hours 
before taking the shot.

This is a must read for anyone interested in snipers and long range high accuracy 
shooting.