The Siege of Tsingtau, The German-Japanese War 1914

This is one of those WWI campaigns that has received very little coverage by historians. The horror of the Western Front has seized the attention of historians and although it was a very important element of WWI, there were many other very important elements, such as that covered by this excellent book – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: The Siege of Tsingtau, The German-Japanese War 1914
FILE: R2574
AUTHOR: Charles Stephenson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  244
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, World War 1, First World War, The Great 
War, Germany, Japan, Far East, German colonies, German trading centres, 
siege warfare

ISBN: 1-52670-292-4

IMAGE: B2574.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/yayv2xb8
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is one of those WWI campaigns that has received 
very little coverage by historians.  The horror of the Western Front 
has seized the attention of historians and although it was a very 
important element of WWI, there were many other very important 
elements, such as that covered by this excellent book – Highly 
Recommended.

Perhaps the most intriguing aspect of the Great War was that it was 
a collection of accidents and miscalculations that was to have far 
reaching and unintended consequences decades after the war was ended. 
The war itself was begun because the nations of European sleep-walked 
into war. It has been described as a European Civil War, and as a 
Family Dispute, where if the real reasons for conflict were ever 
known, nobody could remember exactly what they were when the guns fell 
silent.

Principally, the twin reasons for a war in Europe were both German. 
Bismark's efforts to bind the German-speaking world into a new nation 
were seriously flawed, as were to be the next two attempts at European 
Union under Hitler's Nazis and the Eurocrats of the failing European 
Union. The weakness was that such a union threatened neighbours and 
eventually those neighbours were bound to rise up. It was unstable 
because it was attempting to bind ancient nations that had their own 
long and proud history, with a society that was unique. What made the 
process potentially very dangerous was that the European nations had 
all built their own global empires. It may have been that the British 
Empire was by far the largest, richest and most powerful, but it was 
by no means unique. Particularly in China, the European nations had 
all tried to set up their own trading posts which they needed to 
protect against the Chinese and each other.

Into this potential cauldron came a Japan which was ending its 
isolation from the world. The Japanese had built a modern and 
powerful fleet with more than a little help and encouragement from 
Britain, following the crude colonial attempts of the USA to employ 
gunboat diplomacy to open Japan to US traders. Japan and Britain had 
many things in common, being a small collection of islands off a 
large and potentially hostile coast. Both nations had a high regard 
for their national and social characteristics, with a strict class 
system and a strong code of ethics and duty. When the Russians sent 
a fleet to challenge Japan it had been comprehensively defeated. 
Japan no longer just had confidence in its Fleet, but proof that it 
could take on anyone it chose.

As Europe lumbered towards WWI, the British were already looking to 
form allegiances and Japan was a natural friend at that time. This 
immediately placed the German interests in China and the surrounding 
areas at immediate and direct risk. The Siege of Tsingtau was the 
fulcrum of the Japanese war with Germany's Asia-Pacific Colonial 
Empire. The author has described well the build up to war, the siege 
and the Japanese victory over Germany. This under told part of WWI 
was to have enormous consequences for the world and has continued to 
influence events more than one hundred years later, including the 
growing danger of a nuclear war triggered by North Korea.