The Revolts of Eunus & Salvius, 136-132 & 105-100 BC, Rome’s Sicilian Slave Wars

Marxists may recently have been attempting to use more recent slavery for political advantage, but slavery is as ancient as humans and even though Britain did so much at such great national cost in the early 19th Century to abolish slavery, it is still a curse of the world and an essential part of Islam. The Romans depended very heavily on the use of slaves. They were a commodity, and engine of expansion and, although some were treated very well and freed, a great many were not. Very Highly Recommended

NAME:    The Revolts of Eunus & Salvius, 136-132 & 105-100 BC, Rome's 
Sicilian Slave Wars
FILE: R3251
AUTHOR: Natale Barca
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                              
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Ancient Rome, Roman Republic, Roman Empire, slaves, ancient 
commerce, wars, prisoners, slave markets, treatment, opportunity, revolt, suppression

ISBN: 1-53676-746-5

PAGES: 256
IMAGE: B3251.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y4hzoecf
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Marxists may recently have been attempting to use more recent 
slavery for political advantage, but slavery is as ancient as humans and even though 
Britain did so much at such great national cost in the early 19th Century to abolish 
slavery, it is still a curse of the world and an essential part of Islam.  The Romans 
depended very heavily on the use of slaves. They were a commodity, and engine 
of expansion and, although some were treated very well and freed, a great many 
were not.   Very Highly Recommended


The author has reviewed two slave revolts that shook Rome. His careful research and analysis provides pictures that will be completely new to many readers. It is surprising that not more attention has been paid to the use of slaves in Roman history and their contribution to the rise of both the Republic and the Empire. Slavery has been an intimate part of societies through history. It was widespread after the Fall of Rome in the developing history of Europe and the Vikings, a people who valued equality and freedom, made much from the slave trade, with Ivar Ragarsson running a major slave trading centre from Dublin. Slavery was an integral part of Feudalism and Islam depended heavily on slaves, creating a huge slave trade in Africa with the help of Africans. When Europeans started to open colonies in the Americas they bought slaves from the Arab traders and Africans to provide the labour to establish plantations. In the United States, it became a major cause for civil war and the Democrats established the KKK after the civil war in the hope of restoring the slave trade. The national socialists of the 20th Century in Russia and Germany depended on slaves and were happy to work them to death or to exterminate anyone in their power who could not work as a slave. Today slavery is still rife and largely built around Islam with human traffickers making huge sums from it.

In Ancient Rome, slavery was therefore just a natural part of life, and slave owners varied greatly in their behaviour to their slaves. A great many Roman slaves were treated very well, but were still commodities unable to make their own choices. A number were freed and became Roman Citizens. It is very difficult today to look back at how badly the majority of slaves were treated, because the only records were written by Romans and others with a tradition of slave ownership.

The author has provided a most insightful study that sets out the origins of two revolts by slaves and an account of how the Romans responded. The author has also looked at the legacy they left in relation to the much more famous slave revolt led by Spartacus. 73-71 BC