The Pope’s Army, The Papacy in Diplomacy and War

An impressively comprehensive account of a subject which is a lesser known part of the history of the Roman Church for many readers. The colourful Vatican’s Swiss Guards may be a familiar part of the impression left with visitors to Rome but the history behind them and their duties beyond the ceremonial is a fascinating story – Very Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

NAME: The Pope's Army, The Papacy in Diplomacy and War
FILE: R2944
AUTHOR: John Carr
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 152
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Vatican City, City State, Papal Authority, self-defence, intelligence 
services, mercenaries, Swiss Guard, Popes at war, armed threats, Fall of Rome, 
Medieval period, religious war, power blocks, Holy Roman Emperor

ISBN: 1-52671-489-2

IMAGE: B2944.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyrl.com/yxunutho
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: An impressively comprehensive account of a subject which is a 
lesser known part of the history of the Roman Church for many readers. The 
colourful Vatican's Swiss Guards may be a familiar part of the impression left 
with visitors to Rome but the history behind them and their duties beyond the 
ceremonial is a fascinating story  –   Very Highly Recommended

Religions change over time as part of the wider changes in society. For much of the 
last 2,000 year history of the Roman Church has been a formidable political and 
military power with its own troops and intelligence officers. In the beginning, the 
Christian Church in Rome was an underground religion, literally existing in the 
catacombs under the city. As it developed it came out into the light and subject to the 
external forces in the same way as any other citizens of Rome.

Pope Innocent I tried to avert the sack of Rome by the Visigoths and the history of 
the armed Church, and its growing political power, began roughly from 410. In 1870, 
Pope Pius IX was abandoned by the French Army and the new Italian state forced 
submission to its power. Between 410 and 1870, the succession of Popes had a close 
involvement in politics and military power no different from other princes and kings 
of the times. There were also little-known battles in the late 19th Century between 
papal volunteers, from all over Europe and America, and the Italian nationalists who 
ultimately prevailed.

The fortunes of Popes waxed and waned down the centuries and some led troops in 
battle. The papal armies survived even though their numbers and effectiveness may 
have varied, with a several of Popes being controlled by secular monarchs. Much of 
this history is little known and this book is illuminating and enjoyable. There is an 
interesting selection of images in the photo-plate section to support the very readable 
text.