The Lusitania Sinking, Eyewitness Accounts From Survivors

This is based on collected primary source information, providing a vivid picture of what happened through the eyes of those who survived. The sinking of the Lusitania has been controversial and generated many conspiracy theories. However it was a significant maritime tragedy and ensured that the US entered the war against Germany. – Much Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: The Lusitania Sinking, Eyewitness Accounts From Survivors
FILE: R2832
AUTHOR: Anthony Richards
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Greenhill Books
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 214
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Unrestricted submarine warfare, submarines, U-Boats, passenger liner, 
Lusitania, political consequences, WWI, World War One, World War I, World 
War 1, The Great War, naval warfare, blockade

ISBN: 978-1-78438-301-5

IMAGE: B2832.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y6e977x6
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   This is based on collected primary source information, 
providing a vivid picture of what happened through the eyes of those who 
survived. The sinking of the Lusitania has been controversial and generated 
many conspiracy theories. However it was a significant maritime tragedy and 
ensured that the US entered the war against Germany. - Much Recommended

The use of submarines in WWI was controversial. Historically, a blockading warship 
ordered a suspect vessel to heave to and submit to inspection. If it was found to be 
carrying contraband under the terms of war it could be sunk, or taken as a prize. The 
crew and any passengers had to be protected and either interned or repatriated. 

A submarine was not equipped to honour this tradition. It did not have the capacity 
to take aboard more than a handful of people from a hostile vessel and, if it surfaced, 
send across a boarding party and await the results of the search, it could be vulnerable 
to enemy warships and aircraft. U-Boats did surface and challenge small merchant 
vessels, frequently sailing vessels, and used gunfire to sink them because they were 
not worth taking as prizes, but only a small crew could be taken away by the 
submarine, or left to use their lifeboats to save themselves. 

In any other situation, the U-Boats needed to make a stealthy approach, usually 
submerged, and sink the unsuspecting vessel by torpedoes. This would result in 
casualties on the target, often heavy casualties. It also presented a major challenge 
for the U-Boat skipper. How did he avoid sinking an innocent neutral vessel? Either 
he erred on the side of safety and let potential targets escape, or he risked major 
international incidents by sinking a vessel that should not be attacked.

To simplify matters the Germans decided to declare unrestricted submarine warfare. 
This gave permission for any U-Boat to ignore established military conventions and 
sink anything that looked like a potential valid target. Inevitably, vessels that were 
innocent under the rules of war were attacked and sunk, their passengers and crews 
being killed, wounded or exposed to extreme risk in open lifeboats some distance 
for shore or rescue at sea.

Lusitania was a passenger ship operating on the trans-Atlantic crossing and carrying 
passengers of many nationalities with a large number being US citizens. How far she 
came under war rules as a legitimate target is highly debatable. To be attacked with 
torpedoes was very controversial and casualties amongst citizens of neutral countries 
were inevitable. Her sinking proved a major own goal for the Germans by making 
US involvement in the war inevitable at a time when revolution in Russia was about 
to free German troops for the Western Front.

This book is informative and touching, resulting from a mother's search for 
information about her son who was embarked aboard the Lusitania. In writing to 
survivors, she built up an amazing collection of accounts from survivors. To say 
that this has provided a previously unseen historical treasure trove is an 
understatement. It provides insight, observation and experience from people under 
great stress. It details many previously unknown facts and insights.

It provides a moving memorial to the 1,198 men, women and children, including 
the Mrs Prichard's student son, who lost their lives in this great maritime disaster.