The Lost Story of the Ocean Monarch, Fire, Family, & Fidelity

The author is establishing herself as a specialist in the subject of maritime disasters. This is another memorial account that captures the terrors of maritime disaster, bringing the dead back to life. – Most Highly Recommended.


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NAME: The Lost Story of the Ocean Monarch, Fire, Family, & Fidelity
FILE: R2713
AUTHOR: Gill Hoffs
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 241
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Immigrant crossings, trans-Atlantic, Liverpool, Boston MA, sailing ships, 
fire, sinkings, survival, courage cowardice, wooden ships, Victorian Era

ISBN: 1-52673-439-7

IMAGE: B2713.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyur.com/ycu2klk2
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The author is establishing herself as a specialist in the subject of 
maritime disasters. This is another memorial account  that captures the terrors of 
maritime disaster, bringing the dead back to life.  – Most Highly Recommended.

The author wrote a most memorable account of the “Sinking of RMS Tayleur” and then followed it with 
the equally memorable account “The Lost Story of the William & Mary”. This new book repeats a very 
successful formula and provides a compelling account of the dangers of sea travel in the Victorian Age.

The foundations of the British Empire may have been laid in the Golden Age of Elizabeth I, but the race for 
Empire really began in the aftermath of the Battle of Trafalgar. From 1805 the Royal Navy was undisputed 
master of the seas. Not all expeditions were successful, with the success of the taking Cape Colony being 
followed by the abortive attempt to aid Argentine rebels in their struggle for independence. In fairness to 
Admiral Popham, he took an inspired decision to sail from Cape Town to Buenos Aires and expected the 
politicians to back his initial success with reinforcements. After his consolidation of his taking of the Cape, 
he could have enjoyed a second success and speeded the breakup of the Spanish Empire.

What was demanded to exploit the opportunities of the first truly global empire was a large fleet of merchant 
vessels. Britain rapidly built a huge fleet that was initially sail powered, but it still left space for other nations 
to provide merchant transport. As steam started to make its mark, the sailing vessel was not immediately 
replaced. Sail was still numerically dominant into the late Victorian period and the last commercial sailing 
vessels were not retired until the 1960s. The final vessels tended to be the economic sailing barges, crewed 
typically by a man and a boy, providing a coastal shipping service, carrying cargoes like Scotch from Scottish 
distilleries down the East Coast to London. Ironically, fire was a greater threat on sailing ships than on steam-
powered vessels, even though the steam required a very large fire in the boiler room.

In this absorbing tale, Gill Hoffs tells the story of a fairly typical merchant ship on the sailing from Liverpool 
to Boston MA in the mid-Nineteenth Century. The combination of tarred rope and wood of the sailing ship 
was a major threat in the event of fire. Even a small fire could very rapidly develop beyond any hope of 
extinguishing it. The Ocean Monarch carried a typical selection of trans-Atlantic passengers. Of the 400 
aboard, this was an emigrant ship taking Europeans to the USA for a new life. Many would be poor, and the 
crew to passenger ratio low.

The 170th anniversary  of the disaster is an appropriate time to bring back to life the people and the ship. This 
is a story of courage and cowardice. Some ships rushed to the rescue, but others turned away. People on the 
Welsh Coast watched helplessly in horrified fascination. This is the full story and it holds the readers 
attention. There is also a very interesting photo-plate section of B&W images that nicely complements the 
text.