The Lords of War, Supreme Leadership From Lincoln to Churchill

This is a truly fascinating work that will appeal to military professionals, enthusiasts, historians and the general reader. A study of war leaders and military commanders from Napoleon to Winston Churchill. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME:   The Lords of War, Supreme Leadership From Lincoln to Churchill
FILE: R3172
AUTHOR: Corelli Barnet
PUBLISHER: The Praetorian Press, Pen & Sword 
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Napoleon Bonaparte,Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S Grant, Robert E Lee, 
Helmuth Graf von Moltke, Napoleon III, Joseph Joffre,von Moltke the Younger, 
Douglas Haig, David Lloyd George, Philippe Petain, Eric Ludendorff, Erwin 
Rommel, Isoruku Yamamoto, Arthur Harris, William Slim, Bertram Ramsay, Dwight 
D Eisenhower, Georgi Zhukov, Adolph Hitler, Winston Churchill

ISBN: 1-78159-093-1

PAGES: 321
IMAGE: B3172.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/ycze6dzf
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This is a truly fascinating work that will appeal to military 
professionals, enthusiasts, historians and the general reader. A study of war leaders 
and military commanders from Napoleon to Winston Churchill. – Most Highly 
Recommended.


Inevitably there will be some readers who feel some worthy subjects have been missed and others who will feel that there are some unnecessary inclusions, but this is a very balanced selection of war lords who are important to history. Some may remain greats for centuries to come and others will not make that exclusive club. At first glance it may seem that the author has wandered away from national leaders or from major military commanders but what he has achieved in an exemplary manner is a review that shows how each of those covered by his work have achieved a level of leadership that is notable in war and in military history.

When authors and publishers invite a foreword from a notable personality the result is frequently very disappointing and readers come to ignore forewords. In this case, General the Lord Dannatt has provided a very appropriate foreword that adds to the presentation of this fine work.

Although this book is based on a lifetime as historian and writer, it reads fluently, avoids the stuffy academic stance that some authors might take and provides a text which will satisfy a wide readership. Professionals will appreciate the insights and scholarship. Enthusiasts will enjoy the three dimensional pictures of important historic figures and the general reader will find a work that reads well and passes on the author’s enthusiasm for his subjects and his careful research.

One of the challenges for anyone undertaking such a study of war leadership has to contend with the rather inaccurate myths and legends that have sprung up over the years and previously gone unchallenged. Napoleon is a military commander and national leader who has made a significant mark on European history, although Wellington was deeply disappointed in his military skills at the only battle, Waterloo, where the two famous leaders faced each other across the battle lines. There are also those who question whether Napoleon was personally responsible for conceiving some of the critical elements of the Code Napoleon. In reality, a leader may conceive an outline, filled in by others, or adopt and make possible a concept from another. It really matters little because the final result is that he created an environment in which significant changes became possible.

Hitler is another figure who has been demonized and misrepresented because the sum of his impact on European history has been marked principally by the Holocaust. Hitler was created by his childhood and his service during WWI where he found himself as a soldier. He was virulently anti-Semitic, as were many Europeans and, whatever his apologists try to claim, he had an intimate knowledge of the industrial scale genocide conducted by the Nazis and was the architect where his prejudices were enacted by people he selected for high office. As a war leader he was largely the best friend the Allies had. His greatest skill was as an orator and propagandist. However he made a deep mark on Europe and this did not end with his suicide and German surrender. Many Nazis regrouped behind what became the European Union and money stolen by the Nazis was, and still is, used to support the ‘European Project’.

Sir Winston Churchill is another controversial character who saved Britain from defeat, then engineered the alliances that brought ultimate victory and was the most diverse character of recent history, soldier, war correspondent, historian, writer, painter, twice head of the Admiralty, WWI field commander, lone voice and exactly the character needed by Britain in 1940. He may also be one of the most difficult war leaders to review because there were so many facets to him, contradictions, strengths, frailties, certainties, doubts, brilliance and short comings.

The author has handled all of this remarkably and readers will enjoy his presentations of the people who made recent history.