The Life and Ship Models of Norman Ough

b2398

There are very few books about modellers and model engineers. Those 
that are available tend to feature individuals that are famous for 
something else but happen to be interested in modelling. This book 
is different because it reviews the story of the modeller and his 
models. Ough is considered by many to be the greatest  modeller of 
the Twentieth Century. This is a very interesting story and includes 
a selection of the finest drawings and photographs, much recommended.

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NAME: The Life and Ship Models of Norman Ough
FILE: R2398
AUTHOR:  Alistair Roach
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  168
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Models, model-making, model engineering, research, technical 
drawing, ship models, warships, battleships, submarines, destroyers, 
cruisers, aircraft carriers, RN Service Boats, frigates, minesweepers, 
plans, drawings, model collections, model competitions
ISBN: 9781-4738-7947-8
IMAGE: B2398.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/jj9kd2l
LINKS: Current Discount Offers http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/sale 
DESCRIPTION: There are very few books about modellers and model 
engineers. Those that are available tend to feature individuals that 
are famous for something else but happen to be interested in modelling. 
This book is different because it reviews the story of the modeller 
and his models. Ough is considered by many to be the greatest  modeller 
of the Twentieth Century. This is a very interesting story and includes 
a selection of the finest drawings and photographs, much recommended.

Modelling is frequently an anonymous activity. There have been a number 
of accomplished modellers who are public figures because of some other 
skill, attribute or activity. This may be the result of much 
misunderstanding of the range of activities that result in the 
completion of models of ships, aircraft, vehicles, trains and 
buildings. Many children build models and the line between toy and 
detailed facsimile can be fine. However, children learn so much from 
building models. They learn skills of patience, dexterity, attention to 
detail and observation. Many of these young modellers will produce 
models of a quality that should be exhibited and entered into 
competitions. Sadly very few fine models are exhibited or competed.

Within modelling clubs, there is competition and exhibition, but the 
results are rarely seen outside the modeller's home or the model club.

A very small number of young modellers grow their hobby into a life 
work and a method of income generation. Those who do are still usually 
anonymous. Architectural models are a very important part of the 
marketing of new developments and refurbishment or restoration of 
important buildings. Many thousands of models in this category are 
constructed every year around the world, but very rarely do they 
include a credit to the builder.

Commercial models of aircraft, ships, and vehicles are constructed in 
very large numbers. They also play an important marketing role 
because the real object is too large to conveniently display in 
offices and at public conferences and exhibitions. As with 
architectural models, the builder, or team of builders, are very 
rarely credited for their very detailed and accurate work.

For hundreds of years, ship models have been made for shipbuilding 
yards. Again, they are important marketing aids and will also be used 
as a reference during construction of the full-size vessel. The 
models are often presented to the customer and exhibited in marine 
offices and military bases. The detail and accuracy of the model is 
of prime importance and can occupy many hours of highly skilled work. 
Norman Ough was commissioned by Earl Mountbatten to model all of the 
ships on which the Earl had served. Although many of Ough's models 
were built for static display, he was retained by film production 
companies to build large working models for special effects.

The author, himself an accomplished modeller, has made a good job of 
presenting the life and achievements of Norman Ough. The detailed and 
readable text flows around a very fine selection of images and the 
total information is extensive. Photographs are of good quality and 
there are some excellent pin-sharp full colour photographs. The 
drawings are excellent and include some highly detailed technical 
drawings. The publisher has worked hard to produce a book that can 
be offered at an affordable price, inevitably resulting in small font 
sizes and compressed illustrations. It would have been nice for the 
book to be published in a large format, but this would have increased 
the cover price three fold and reduced the number of readers who could 
stretch to the price, so the actual size is a very small and acceptable 
price to pay for making it available to a large readership.