The Last Of Africa’s Cold War Conflicts, Portuguese Guinea and its Guerrilla Insurgency

One of the least known surrogate hot wars of the Cold War. The first European power to establish colonies in Africa was Portugal and this book provides an insightful review of the last insurrection in what had been the Portuguese Empire Highly Recommended

NAME:    The Last Of Africa's Cold War Conflicts, Portuguese Guinea and its 
Guerrilla Insurgency
FILE: R3243
AUTHOR: Al J Venter
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Cold War, colonies, colonial legacy, independence, infiltration, 
insurgency, guerrilla warfare, Cuba, Soviet Union, CIA, post-colonial Africa, tribal 
divisions, politics, communism

ISBN: 1-52677-298-1

PAGES: 210
IMAGE: B3243.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y5jxl34k
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: One of the least known surrogate hot wars of the Cold War.  The 
first European power to establish colonies in Africa was Portugal and this book 
provides an insightful review of the last insurrection in what had been the 
Portuguese Empire   Highly Recommended


The Portuguese undertook the first of the great post-Medieval voyages from Europe, voyaging across and down the Atlantic, around into the Indian Ocean and onwards to the Pacific to Japan and China. This led to the establishment of ‘factories’ or colonies as staging posts where their ships could water and re-victual. Many of these staging posts consisted of nothing more than a fort and a few warehouses. In Africa they supported the purchase of slaves from Arab and African slavers to serve their more substantial colonies in South America. The Portuguese colonies were soon to be dwarfed by those of Spain, Britain and France but survived longest as the other European nations beat a hasty retreat after WWII.

These remaining outposts became targets during the Cold War as the Soviets and their Cuban mercenaries thought they were easy targets, having limited or no resources worth exploiting and small populations. Portuguese Guinea, becoming Guine Bissau, was roughly the size of Belgium, sparsely populated, but no easy target. The battle raged on for a decade. It was fiercely fought and was waged invisibly only because Vietnam took all the press attention.

The author has provided a rare glimpse into the savage history of the conflict with insight and clarity. The photo-plate section contains rare images in support of the text. As the template for Rhodesian and Namibian insurgencies, Guine Bissau is a war very worthy of study.