The Irish Brigade, 1670-1745, The Wild Geese In French Service

The Irish Brigade was intended to help the Jacobite cause but, ironically, helped solidify the English Crown. This account of the history of the Irish Brigade sheds light on a formation that has received very little attention previously from historians – Highly Recommended

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NAME: The Irish Brigade, 1670-1745, The Wild Geese In French Service
FILE: R2920
AUTHOR: D P Graham
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 472
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Charles II, James II, Jacobites, insurrection, exiles, The Nine Years War, 
The War of Spanish Succession, The War of the Austrian Succession, The 1745 
Jacobite Rebellion, elite formation

ISBN: 1-52672-773-0

IMAGE: B2920.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2fw3khx
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The Irish Brigade was intended to help the Jacobite cause but, 
ironically, helped solidify the English Crown. This account of the history of the 
Irish Brigade sheds light on a formation that has received very little attention
previously from historians   –  Highly Recommended

Ireland has a history of fighting that goes back into the mists of time. When there is 
no one else, the Irish fight amongst themselves. For much of recent history, the Irish 
have fought largely on religious lines and the Irish Brigade was established to 
support the Roman Catholics against the Protestants in the British Isles, rallying 
behind the Stuart Kings, Charles II and James II, both of whom were believers in 
the divine right of Kings and the Catholic Church.

The French, as with many other countries in the 17th and 18th Centuries, relied on 
foreign armed bands to augment their own native troops. The Irish Brigade was 
initially just one of a number of foreign formations, many of whom were there 
only for the money. One Scottish family maintained two regiments in Germany 
for much of this period, fighting alongside the Swedish armies. For most British, 
the Royal Navy offered the most lucrative opportunities, with prize money setting 
up many a family. On the European mainland the opportunities for loot and pay lay 
with armies and an almost continuous flow of wars between ever changing alliances.

The author has provided an absorbing account of a military formation that became 
an elite force within the French Army that continued to serve the French through to 
the French Revolution. There is economical illustration to support the able text.