The History of Terror, Mary, Tudor Terror, 1553-1558

The descriptive text is supported by many images through the body of the text. The author has described the Roman Catholic terror visited on England by Henry VIII’s eldest daughter – Highly Recommended

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NAME: The History of Terror, Mary, Tudor Terror, 1553-1558
FILE: R2741
AUTHOR: Phil Carradice
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword 
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES: 128
PRICE: £12.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Tudor Dynasty, religious war, Henry VIII's first daughter, Philip of Spain, 
Anglo-Spanish links, Inquisition, torture, death by burning

ISBN: 1-52672-865-6

IMAGE: B2741.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y7ps7azs
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:  The descriptive text is supported by many images through the 
body of the text.  The author has described the Roman Catholic terror visited on 
England by Henry VIII's eldest daughter  -  Highly Recommended

The Tudor Dynasty of three Kings and two Queens was one of the most turbulent in the history of the 
British Isles. The two Tudor Queens were very different in many ways but shared some important
 characteristics. When Mary came to the throne she was welcomed by wild rejoicing and a level of 
popularity that promised a great reign. Sadly she turned that support into widespread loathing in only 
five short years and it was to be her younger half sister Elizabeth who was to be remembered as 
Elizabeth the Great and by her Golden Age.

Both of Henry's daughters suffered troubled childhoods because of his search for a marriage to produce 
a male heir. Mary was brought up strongly in the Roman Catholic faith by her mother, taught also to 
value her Spanish heritage, and convinced of her right to rule. Henry's second wife Anne was a believer 
in the Protestant faith that was growing against the Roman Church and she worked to move England to 
the new beliefs, aided by the political Pope who resisted Henry's pleas for the annulment of his marriage 
to Catherine, to clear the way for him to marry Anne. Henry saw the creation of an independent church in 
England as a still Catholic Faith that just placed the Monarch as the Head of Church in place of the Pope. 
He did not engage in a concerted war to completely remove Catholics by his own terror. That meant that 
his death led to a succession by two daughters who were opposed in beliefs but both very much the 
daughters of an autocratic and ruthless King.

In her short reign, Mary was responsible for unleashing a terror on Protestants and many who were still 
more inclined to the Roman faith. Almost three hundred Protestants were killed by fire at the Stake and 
many more were held in prison and tortured brutally. Her actions earned her the deserved epithet of 
Bloody Mary. 

Her terror was the most concentrated violence by the State in the British Isles, never preceded by equal 
acts and never followed. Elizabeth's pragmatic approach to faith in the face of attempts to kill her by 
Roman Catholics earned her support from her people.

A salutatory lesson in religious intolerance that is as valid today as new religious fanatics seek to force 
their perverted values on others.