The Great Waterloo Controversy, The Story of the 52nd Foot at History’s Greatest Battle

This book rights a wrong at one of the great battles of history, by recognizing the part played by the 52nd Foot in throwing back Napoleon’s last throw of the dice. The Foot Guards were recognized for their part in breaking Napoleon’s Imperial Guard but the 52nd Foot were overlooked Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  The Great Waterloo Controversy, The Story of the 52nd Foot at History’s 
Greatest Battle
FILE: R3355
AUTHOR: Gareth Glover
PUBLISHER: Frontline Books, Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                              
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Battle of Waterloo, 1815, Lord Wellington, C in C Allied Forces, 
Hougoumont, artillery, Light Infantry, 1st Foot Guards, 52nd Foot, Imperial Guard, 
French Cavalry, French artillery, Dutch forces, Prussians, Napoleon, exile’s return

ISBN: 1-52678-885-3

PAGES: 306,  8 page full colour photo-plate section, and illustration through the body 
of the book, mainly in the form of maps and battle positions.
IMAGE: B3355.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/d2yuvhnz
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: This book rights a wrong at one of the great battles of history, by 
recognizing the part played by the 52nd Foot in throwing back Napoleon’s last throw 
of the dice. The Foot Guards were recognized for their part in breaking 
Napoleon’s Imperial Guard but the 52nd Foot were overlooked  Very Highly 
Recommended

Wellington and Napoleon met on the field of battle for the first time at Waterloo and, as history records, Wellington put the French to flight and ended Napoleon’s hopes for imperial power once more. Also recorded was Wellington’s disappointment that Napoleon was just a ‘pounder’ in contrast with Napoleon’s Marshals who Wellington had met and beaten in the Peninsular War and for whom he had some respect.

History has recorded the spirited defence of a French farm house, the Hougoumont Enclosure, by British troops, slowing Napoleon’s progress towards the main Allied army commanded by Wellington. Also recorded is the part the Prussians met as they fought through to join Wellington before the end of the battle. In particular though we remember the Grenadier Guards, the 1st Foot Guards at the battle, receiving their new name for their pivotal part in breaking Napoleon’s Imperial Guard, the ‘Grey Moustaches’. The Imperial Guard were the elite of Napoleon’s military and were held until Napoleon considered he was about to win a battle, when he committed them to break the enemy. By tradition they had never before been beaten.

What has escaped history is the critical role of the British 52nd Foot.

The author has based a spirited defence of the right of the 52nd Foot to be recognized. He has been assisted stoutly by the previously unpublished journal of Charles Holman of the 52nd Foot. This has helped the author to understand the likely sequence of events. From this he has explained why the 1st Foot Guards were awarded the honours and the 52nd Foot overlooked.