The Desert Air Force in World War II, Air-power in the Western Desert 1940-1942

The author has produced a rare detailed account of the Desert Air Force in WWII. Historians have placed their main focus on the land battles and the commanders, particularly on Montgomery and Rommel, but the air battles were vital to victory – Highly Recommended.


http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

 

NAME: The Desert Air Force in World War II, Air-power in the Western 
Desert 1940-1942
FILE: R2490
AUTHOR: Ken Delve
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  160
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, North 
Africa, tank battles, desert warfare, air war, fighters, bombers, 
anti-tank aircraft

ISBN: 1-84415-817-9

IMAGE: B2490.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/mkxbgm4
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The author has produced a rare detailed account of the 
Desert Air Force in WWII. Historians have placed their main focus on 
the land battles and the commanders, particularly on Montgomery and 
Rommel, but the air battles were vital to victory – Highly Recommended.

North Africa tended to depend on hand-me-downs from the European 
Theatre. The Desert Air Force faired no better than the British and 
Commonwealth Armies. In 1940, biplanes still flew as frontline 
aircraft, but they frequently faced biplanes flown by Italians. As 
more modern aircraft began to arrive, they were often diverted to 
some other battle in Greece or Crete, where they were in insufficient 
numbers and rapidly defeated. By 1942, North Africa was still lacking 
the most modern equipment, but was rapidly catching up on the aircraft 
that had been performing so well in the European skies. This was 
fortunate because the Africa Korps had arrived with standard frontline 
German aircraft.

Aircraft that were less popular in other theatres were sometimes ideal 
in the desert and aircraft that worked well in Europe required 
modifications to cope with the sand and the temperature ranges of North 
Africa. There was also pioneering as the Desert Air Force was required 
to act as flying artillery in a war of fast movement across large open 
spaces. This included the arming of Hurricanes with two powerful 
cannon that could deal with German armour.

The author has provided a comprehensive review and described the 
aircraft, the flyers, the equipment, the tactics and the battles. This 
is the most detailed and accurate book yet published on Allied air 
operations in North Africa leading to the battle of El Alamein and a 
roll back of German forces matching the Soviet actions after 
Stalingrad. This wealth of information is given depth by the 
inclusion of lengthy annexes.