The Curse of the Pharaoh’s Tombs, Tales of the unexpected since the days of Tutankhamun

The mysteries of Ancient Egypt always fascinate and have provided the 
basis of countless horror stories and films. This is a fascinating 
book on a fascinating set of topics, recommended.

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NAME: The Curse of the Pharaoh's Tombs, Tales of the unexpected since 
the days of Tutankhamun
FILE: R2434
AUTHOR:  Paul Harrison
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  144
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Egyptology, archaeology, tombs, curses, afterlife, beliefs, 
superstition, mummification, Egyptian gods, strange deaths, Anubis
ISBN: 1-78159-366-3
IMAGE: B2434.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/jyx83db
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The mysteries of Ancient Egypt always fascinate and have 
provided the basis of countless horror stories and films. This is a 
fascinating book on a fascinating set of topics, recommended.

The publisher has been building an impressive list of titles about 
archaeology. This new book fits well into the list and will appeal to 
a wide readership. It seems that the appetite for books about mummies 
and curses is insatiable. The author has written widely, some 36 
published works already, on mysteries. Here he looks at the curse of 
Pharaoh's Tombs and includes a number of related mysteries, including 
the curse of the Czar's ring.

It is difficult to fully understand the beliefs of Ancient Egypt 
because it was a very different world from that we occupy. Many 
mysteries that perplexed and terrorized our ancestors are easily 
explained away today and this has been leading to an increasingly 
secular world. In Ancient Egypt, as with other ancient cultures, 
there were so many mysteries that could only be explained by 
superstition. The community of gods that were daily invoked in the 
face of famine, flood, or other disaster, or to produce good harvests 
and victory in battle, created the basis for belief in an afterlife 
that current existence was only a preparation for. 

Pharaohs devoted time and great resources to preparing their tombs to 
ensure that they would go into the afterlife well-equipped. 
Inevitably, that meant that the tombs would become the target for 
thieves, leading to the treasures being ransacked and the Pharaoh's 
expectations destroyed. Great ingenuity went into hiding some tombs 
and in generally adding devices to frustrate thieves. Posting a blood-
curdling curse at the entrance to a tomb was considered a simple but 
effective method of discouraging thieves, but although some tombs 
carried curses, others did not the author has looked at this and 
provided fresh insight with new research.

There are tales of tomb raiders who suffered from curses, but much of 
the focus on the Pharaohs' curses has grown up on the back of 
discoveries during the last 150 years as archaeologists have searched 
and found forgotten tombs in Egypt. As the supernatural will always 
hold an interest for humans, there will continue to be belief in some 
of the old tales and the telling of new. Equally, there will be fresh 
explanations for some events blamed historically on curses.

Egypt can be an unfriendly place with poisonous insects and reptiles. 
Tombs can also hold hidden dangers as bacteria lurk in tombs and a 
simple scratch can lead to infection that can prove fatal if not 
quickly treated. Then there are coincidences that develop into new 
lurid tales of curses, and ancient beliefs in the undead that are
dusted down and modernized to create new horror stories.

The reader will find many explanations that cast new light on the 
subject. Some will choose to accept the author's well presented 
conclusion, others may not, but all will find this book absorbing.