The Crimean War, Then & Now

This is a very interesting book that manages to be both a serious history of the Crimean War and a guide book to help those on holiday to find their way around the old battlefields and points of interest. The illustrations, mostly in full colour, provide a level of illustration not achieved before in this subject – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: The Crimean War, Then & Now
FILE: R2643
AUTHOR: David R Jones
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING: hard back
PAGES:  390
PRICE: £35.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: French Army, British Army, Russian Army, Russian expansion, 
Franco-British Alliance, Crimea, Black Sea, siege warfare, logistics

ISBN: 1-84832-491-X

IMAGE: B2643.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/y8no95cm
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: This is a very interesting book that manages to be 
both a serious history of the Crimean War and a guide book to help 
those on holiday to find their way around the old battlefields and 
points of interest. The illustrations, mostly in full colour, 
provide a level of illustration not achieved before in this subject – 
Highly Recommended.

The Crimean War is interesting and important because it shows how 
Russia has always gone through a series of cycles of expansion and 
contraction. It does not matter much who the Russian leader is at 
any time, only his relative strength and also the relative strength 
of those opposing any acts of expansion. In many respects, the 
Crimean War holds strong similarity to the more recent annexation 
of Ukrainian territory by Putin's Russia. Putin's desire to expand 
Russian influence in a new Cold War has combined with the inept 
political pygmies of the European Union who talk big but have 
nothing much behind them. By talking up their own ambitions to 
absorb the Ukraine, they encouraged Putin to make what amounted to 
a pre-emptive strike that has cost the Ukraine an important part of 
their territory with the prospect of further Russian aggression at 
some future date. In the Nineteenth Century, Russia was looking to 
expand again and to turn the Black Sea into a Russian lake. The 
British and the French were worried by this, fearing that it could 
be a continuing expansion at their expense. Like the EU, in a later 
miscalculation over Crimea, the British and French were not prepared 
or able to mount an adequate expedition and sustain it to victory, 
expelling Russia from the Crimea. Their approach simply encouraged 
the Russians further than they appear to have planned. It also 
created fault lines that contributed to WWI.

There were two critical weaknesses in the Franco-British Alliance. 
The first was that the two countries had a thousand years 
experience of being opponents and no experience of combining their 
two armies effectively against a common perceived enemy, beyond 
the 17thC Battle of Sole Bay which did not go well for the Franco-
British Fleet when it was caught by the much smaller Dutch Fleet 
of the United Provinces. The second Crimean weakness was that they 
had to send a fleet with troop transports through the narrow 
Bospherus with a less than friendly nation holding both banks. 
Once into the Black Sea and they were without friendly ports and 
potentially vulnerable to any Russian warships.

There were other lesser by important weaknesses. Both armies were 
structured much as they had been for Centuries, with command being 
more a matter of social rank and money than military merit. That 
further reduced the chances of operating together effectively. Then 
they faced the challenges of keeping their armies supplied in the 
field with only a single port available for the purpose. Just to 
make matters more difficult, Balaclava faced the strong possibly of 
being cut off from the armies once they had landed and deployed.

Today, the Charge of the Light Brigade and the nursing advances of 
Florence Nightingale are all that most Britons will know of the 
conflict, and even those memories are becoming rare. Many will even 
have difficulty in knowing where in the world the Crimea is which 
maybe is little change from the time when the war was underway.

The author has made many trips to the Crimea and built a unique 
photographic library of the Crimean battlefields as they look today. 
As a result he has been able to lay his photographs against the 
illustrations draw at the time of the war. This is an absorbing book