The Battle Of Tsushima

The Battle of Tsushima may be forgotten now, but it had a dramatic impact at the time and set the pattern of warfare through the Twentieth Century and set the politics of the period. The Russian Navy was considered formidable and the Japanese Navy unheard of, and yet the Japanese Fleet Commander inflicted one of the most complete defeats of an enemy fleet in history. Very Highly Recommended

NAME:  The Battle Of Tsushima
FILE: R3298
AUTHOR: Phil Carradice
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £19.99                                                 
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   Naval warfare, steam power, steel ships, new tactics, technology, 
Admirals, Fleet Commanders, Rising Sun, Japanese Navy, Japanese expansion, 
Russia, Russian Navy, political impact, historic battle, shaping naval warfare

ISBN: 1-52674-334-5

PAGES: 184, a sixteen page b&w photo plate section 
IMAGE: B3298.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yx9u5z33
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: The Battle of Tsushima may be forgotten now, but it had a dramatic 
impact at the time and set the pattern of warfare through the Twentieth Century and
set the politics of the period. The Russian Navy was considered formidable and the 
Japanese Navy unheard of, and yet the Japanese Fleet Commander inflicted one 
of the most complete defeats of an enemy fleet in history.  Very Highly 
Recommended

The Russian fleet was long established under Peter The Great who had worked in a British shipyard to learn about what was then leading warship design and construction. However, the Russian Fleet had never been tested in a major battle. The closest they had come before Tsushima was when they sailed out into the Baltic to defeat a Swedish Fleet, when Sweden was Britain’s only ally in the war with Napoleon. The Swedish Fleet was considered no serious opposition but as the Russians sited sail in line of battle to their horror they found it was a Royal Navy Fleet led by HMS Victory. The Russians promptly turned around and sped back to their home port to send down their sails and yards and wait out the war.

In 1905 the Russians once again underestimated their enemy. They sailed their Fleet out of its north western ports and around the world into the Sea of Japan. There they were met by a well-trained and commanded Japanese Fleet equipped with the most modern ships and guns. Russian apologists for their crushing defeat by the Japanese claimed that they had undertaken a mammoth voyage around the world but the Japanese just had to sit and wait for them. Unfortunately for the Russians, that’s war. Its a matter of transport and logistics to deploy assets to where they can reach the enemy and engage them. Simply, the best Fleet and the best Fleet Commander won, not just driving the enemy away, but sinking all of the Russian battleships, together with most of the cruisers and destroyers, leaving only a few damaged warships to limp away.

Tsushima was a great humiliation for Imperial Russia, and encouragement to the Germans, as they took Europe towards the brink of war, and a huge shock to nations that knew of Russia but knew virtually nothing of a Japan that had only recently begun emerging from Medieval isolation. When the Great War erupted, Japan found itself on the side of Britain from where much of its equipment and training had come. Inevitably, this not only led to WWI and another Japanese victory being on the side of the triumphant Allies, but it sowed the seeds of WWII. Tsushima was the first defeat of a European power by an Asian nation. It encouraged the Japanese military, primarily the Army Generals to push for a fast war of aggression to seize raw materials and territory across Asia.

History may have largely forgotten Tsushima, but this book corrects that with good research, engaging text and some fine images in illustrative support.