The Battle Of Goose Green, A Battle Is Fought To Be Won

The Falklands War showed British military personnel at their best and most innovative under the most testing of conditions, and the Battle of Goose Green was one of the classic actions. The author has collected together the impressions of Britain and Argentine personnel from brigadier to corporal. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The Battle Of Goose Green, A Battle Is Fought To Be Won
FILE: R3106
AUTHOR: Mark Adkin
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £15.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Falklands War, 2 Para, Goose Green, Falkland Islands, British Govt., 
Falklands Task Force, Scrap merchants, Argentine bandits, Colonel Jones VC, tactics, 
support, Argentine troops, first crucial class

ISBN: 1-52676-014-2

PAGES: 305
IMAGE: B3106.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/rprb4rl
DESCRIPTION: The Falklands War showed British military personnel at their best 
and most innovative under the most testing of conditions, and the Battle of Goose 
Green was one of the classic actions. The author has collected together the 
impressions of Britain and Argentine personnel from brigadier to corporal. – 
Most Highly Recommended.

We may still be too close to the Falklands War to produce a truly definitive history of 
the War or even individual actions, but this book is certainly an excellent stab at it. 
There is much controversy still and the Argentinians have not yet reached a point of 
understanding, accepting the excesses of the Junta and the Disappeared. As with most 
battles, there will always be questions as to whether the battle should have been 
fought, who had the most significant impact on its out come, how politicians 
interfaced productively or not with the action, how close did the victor come to 
failure. At the time, little of this may be visible. War is the act of dealing with the 
unexpected and always having insufficient resources, impact of the weather 
conditions, the training of the combatants and their morale.

Any battle, and the Battle of Goose Green is no exception, is fought because someone 
made one mistake, or a series of mistakes. In the case of Goose Green, a group of 
ruthless and dishonest Argentine Generals thought the invasion of the Falklands 
would be an easy victory and Britain would be forced to accept the result. In London 
politicians failed to take note of a series of warnings and Civil Servants thought it was 
all part of managed British decline to accept loss of territory a long way from home 
when there was a cosy bureaucracy in Brussels to snuggle up to. The British Prime 
Minister happened to have steel and determination, and British military personnel did 
what they always do and punched well above their weight, surprising and defeating 
the bully with a well aimed punch to the nose. Along the way they faced a range of 
challenges and the critical fact was that at Goose Green, in the first crucial 
engagement of the land war, they won.

The author has made an impressive job of reviewing the important factors, the events 
and decisions that led to the battle.

The Falklands War was a gamble. Politicians had spent decades running down the 
British Armed Services. Had it not been for the brilliant work of a Comptroller of the 
Royal Navy in fooling the Wilson/Healey regime there would have been no aircraft 
carriers to head the Task Force, no Harriers and no Sea Harriers. The dockyards 
responded magnificently in returning to service ships that had been laid up or been 
undergoing refits. As each ship was ready to sail it was stuffed with people and 
equipment and when the ships rendezvoused at the half way point the stores were 
balanced to meet the needs of combat. Even so, it was necessary to make do with 
what ships were available in the time and that meant some cargoes could not be 
distributed to reduce risk. The result was that heavy lift helicopters and other assets 
were lost with the sinking of the Atlantic Conveyor. Where field guns and personnel 
should have been moved around by helicopter, it became a long slog across the main 
island from the landing beaches. It also meant that after Goose Green in the final 
battle, the British howitzers were down to five rounds or less per gun when the 
Argentinians surrendered.

Goose Green was influenced, as every other battle, during the war to victory, by the 
lack of transport for supplies and ammunition.