The Battle of Fontenoy 1745, Saxe Against Cumberland in the War of the Austrian Succession

A perceptive and original account by a leading authority on 18th Century warfare. The Battle of Fontenoy was the turning point in the War of the Austrian Succession and yet it has been very poorly covered before by historians – Very Highly Recommended

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NAME: The Battle of Fontenoy 1745, Saxe Against Cumberland in the War of the 
Austrian Succession
FILE: R2925
AUTHOR: James Falkner
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PAGES: 208
PRICE: £19.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: War of Austrian Succession, Marshal Saxe, Duke of Cumberland, 18th 
Century warfare, Low Countries, Louis XV, Marie Teresa of Austria, Holy Roman 
Emperor, Culloden, Jacobite Rebellion

ISBN: 1-52671-841-3

IMAGE: B2925.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yyptc5gy
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: A perceptive and original account by a leading authority on 18th 
Century warfare. The Battle of Fontenoy was the turning point in the War of the 
Austrian Succession and yet it has been very poorly covered before by 
historians –  Very Highly Recommended

Cumberland is remembered for his brutal defeat of the Jacobites in 1745 at 
Culloden. The finality of that battle may be the reason for historians neglecting 
the Battle of Fontenoy in the same year, but the War of the Austrian Succession 
became a block to the ambitions of Louis XV and the Battle of Fontenoy proved to 
be the critical turning point.

The author has not only provided an absorbing narrative that gives fresh insight into 
the Battle of Fontenoy but also provides an expert review of the nature of warfare 
of the period in Europe. There are supporting battle maps in the body of the text 
and a good photo-plate section. This is a book that no military history enthusiast 
should miss. It is important in the historical review of the Battle of Fontenoy, but it 
also adds depth to the conflicts that raged through the Low Countries during the 
18th Century, adding to the formidable reviews by the same author of the earlier 
progress and triumphs of Marlborough.