The Battle For Paris 1815, The Untold Story Of The Fighting After Waterloo

Story of the final battles after Waterloo have been strangely missing, particularly in the English language. The author has provided a very readable account of the Battle for Paris and final engagements. – Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The Battle For Paris 1815, The Untold Story Of The Fighting After Waterloo
FILE: R3110
AUTHOR: Paul L Dawson
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Napoleonic Wars, Battle of Waterloo, Napoleon, brigade commanders, 
divisional commanders, deserters, civilians

ISBN: 1-52674-927-0

PAGES: 283
IMAGE: B3110.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/w4zzfxn
DESCRIPTION: Story of the final battles after Waterloo have been strangely 
missing, particularly in the English language. The author has provided a very 
readable account of the Battle for Paris and final engagements. –  Highly 
Recommended.

Waterloo came as a cold shock for French commanders because they had taken for 
granted the myth that Napoleon had never been personally defeated in the field. That 
may have been technically true because Napoleon had been delayed on several 
occasions and left his army behind on the retreat from Moscow, but he had never been 
invincible. When he returned from Elba and raised a new army, he was already sick 
and his new army was less effective than at the height of his military successes. He 
was gambling on reaching Brussels before the Allies could assemble an army against 
him.

In the event he met, in Wellington, an effective commander of coalitions who had 
scouted the ground and chosen where he intended to meet the French. When his 
Imperial Guard were the final throw that was repulsed, his army broke and ran with 
Napoleon fighting through his own troops to get away. As defeats go that was pretty 
comprehensive and the prospects of pulling together a new army from the wreckage 
were remote. However, that did not mean all senior officers had given up.

The author has studied the final battles and provided an interesting assessment of the 
personnel and events, with a useful photo-plate section.