The Battle For Laos, Vietnam’s Proxy War 1955-1975

The Cold War series is developing into a unique and insightful study of a long and bitter conflict that was far from Cold in many parts of the Globe. This edition looks closely at the Battle For Laos and features many rare images through the body of the book and in a full colour photo-plate section – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: The Battle For Laos, Vietnam's Proxy War 1955-1975
FILE: R3028
AUTHOR: Stephen Emerson
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Cold War, Domino Theory, Vietnam War, asynchronous warfare, tropical 
rain forest, Indo China, South East Asia, proxy war, surrogate war, United States, 
Australia, CIA, Special Forces

ISBN: 1-52675-704-4

IMAGE: B3028.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yy7mmzs3
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: The Cold War series is developing into a unique and insightful study 
of a long and bitter conflict that was far from Cold in many parts of the Globe. This 
edition looks closely at the Battle For Laos and features many rare images 
through the body of the book and in a full colour photo-plate section  – Very 
Highly Recommended.

The Cold War was 'cold' only in that neither the US nor the USSR wished to try their 
luck with a conventional invasion, or a nuclear exchange. Instead, they relied on 
proxies to open limited wars, claiming to be independence wars. The Soviet Union 
was reluctant to expose their regular troops in these wars, other than as 'advisors'. The 
US was rather less reluctant and their more belligerent approach was greatly aided by 
their Carrier Task Forces that could hold reinforcements and aircraft at sea beyond the 
reach of the combatants. The CIA has received much criticism, not least for their 
involvement in drug trafficking, torture and errors, but they were correct in spotting 
the Soviet Domino Policy that was essentially similar to that followed by Hitler 
before WWII. By encouraging conflict in one country, the Soviets tried to spread the 
conflict to neighbouring countries, gradually moving across the map and adding to 
their satellites.

To the US, the progress of the conflict was a shock. They had expected to crush the 
insurgents with superior firepower and their reverses came as a bitter surprise. Many 
mistakes were made, particularly in under estimating the enemy, believing in 
technology over ideology, and failing to reign back the excesses of some of the US 
intelligence and military personnel engaged in the conflicts.

The author has produced a well-researched and argued review of the Battle For Laos. 
Following the popular format of the Cold War series, there are a great many images 
used through the book in monochrome with some very interesting images reproduced 
in full colour for the photo-plate section. As with sister volumes in the series, this new 
book represents very good value for money.