TankCraft No.25, Tiger I and Tiger II Tanks, German Army and Waffen-SS Normandy Campaign 1944

Another excellent addition to the TankCraft series of books, aimed primarily at modellers, but applicable to an even wider readership. The Tiger I and Tiger II were a major advance technically although their weight and reliability limited them in achieving their full potential Very Highly Recommended

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NAME:    TankCraft No.25, Tiger I and Tiger II Tanks, German Army and 
Waffen-SS Normandy Campaign 1944
FILE: R3237
AUTHOR: Dennis Oliver
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, TankCraft
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £16.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:   WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, Operation 
Barbarossa, Eastern Front,  Panzer, Panzer Army, Wehrmacht, armoured fighting 
vehicles, heavy tanks,  infantry support,mobile warfare, gun tank, 88mm gun

ISBN: 1-52677-163-2

PAGES: 64
IMAGE: B3237.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y6ac5m5c
LINKS:
DESCRIPTION: Another excellent addition to the TankCraft series of books, aimed 
primarily at modellers, but applicable to an even wider readership.  The Tiger I and 
Tiger II were a major advance technically although their weight and reliability 
limited them in achieving their full potential  Very Highly Recommended


The Tigers were arguably the first true Main Battle Tanks. They carried a formidable main armament of an 88mm anti-tank gun. They also featured highly effective armour. To achieve acceptable performance on roads and across country, they were equipped with a relatively complex set of overlapping road wheels and very wide tracks. Even so, they still had a high ground pressure and were unable to negotiate some road bridges, due to their size and weight.

Reliability was another issue and particularly in the low temperatures on the Eastern Front. Reliability issues comprised the consequences of rushed development, manufacturing delays due to bombing and shortages of materials, and a design that potentially offered great promise, but often resulted in component failures. The thirst for fuel was another major issue as fuel shortages limited deployments.

During the Normandy Campaign the Tigers were technically superior but even the Sherman, when equipped with the British 17 pounder Firefly gun and operated with skill and cunning, could kill Tigers. The other very strong Allied advantage was that their tanks could be easily replaced and were available in the field in significant numbers.

As with the other titles in this series, there is a well-researched and written introduction that provides a very effective coverage of the subjects. The artwork commissioned for the book is excellent and the photography from archives and commissioned in full colour to support the modelling guides makes these outstanding books to augment any enthusiasts library of land warfare and uniquely provides for the needs of modellers.