Tank Rider, Into the Reich With The Red Army

These are the memoirs of a Red Army officer describing his experiences in the 4th Tank Army from Kursk to the fall of Berlin. – This is an honest account of soldiers at war, a unique view of the Russian soldier in WWII – Highly Recommended.


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NAME: Tank Rider, Into the Reich With The Red Army
FILE: R2565
AUTHOR: Evgeni Bessonov
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Frontline
BINDING: soft back
PAGES:  254
PRICE: £16.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War, Great 
Patriotic War, armour, tanks, AFV, Armoured Fighting Vehicles, gun 
tank, flak tank, assault gun, mortar, infantry, Soviet Army, Red 
Army, T-34, tank riders, Kursk, fall of Berlin

ISBN: 1-47389-788-2

IMAGE: B2565jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/ybhh3cdm
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: These are the memoirs of a Red Army officer describing 
his experiences in the 4th Tank Army from Kursk to the fall of Berlin.
  - This is an honest account of soldiers at war, a unique view of 
the Russian soldier in WWII – Highly Recommended.

There is a great shortage of accounts by and about Soviet military 
personnel, equipment, tactics and battles, published in the English 
language. This is a warts and all memory of life in the 4th Tank Army 
as it battled at Kursk and then advanced into Germany and on to the 
fall of Berlin. This is an officer's view that takes no prisoners and 
recounts the courage, fear, comradeship, bravery, stupidity, horror 
and pleasure of those in the military community above and below him.

All armies have brilliant commanders, idiots at all levels in the 
chain of command, heroes, cowards, good people, criminals, time 
servers, politicians, average people. Remarkably little has been 
known of the Soviet military during WWII. That applies inside the 
Soviet Union as well as outside. The Soviet elite released to their 
own people only information that was considered helpful to the Soviet 
and tried very hard to contain all information from the West. Part of 
that was due to the plans for what became the Cold War, the take over 
of democratic neighbours and the first active steps in Greece
before the ending of WWII. Churchill appears to be the only western 
politician to appreciate in advance what would happen in the years 
following 1945.

This book features some interesting photographs and informative maps 
in support of descriptive text that provides a view of how people 
from many backgrounds came together in the unfamiliar world of an 
army at war, living in a closed society that for most would be the 
most intensive part of their lives and so similar in many respects 
to life for British, American, Commonwealth, Italian and German 
soldiers.

The photo-plate section shows how the Red Army depended on vehicles 
provided by the US and the British. This was not acknowledged by 
the Soviets to their own people. When Red Army and US troops met in 
1945, a Red Army officer expressed surprise that the Americans were 
using Soviet half tracks and even more surprised when a US soldier 
showed him the original makers plates for the White half track under 
a crude Soviet plate. The Red Army was not shy in putting captured 
German vehicles into service which were obviously German, but the 
many Universal carriers – Bren Gun Carriers – supplied by Britain 
were favoured vehicles that were not acknowledged as British-built. 
US trucks, jeeps and towing vehicles were used in large numbers, 
making the Red Army far more mechanized than the Germans, who still 
relied on horses to pull artillery and supply carts.

This book will provide some many insights of value to historians and 
enthusiasts alike.