Tank Craft, Sherman Tanks, British Army and Royal Marines, Normandy Campaign 1944

This addition to the very popular Pen & Sword Craft 
series is up to a very high established standard. The 
excellent illustrations and examples of completed kits 
will appeal strongly to modellers of all ages, but there 
is also very good concise text that provides a clear 
overview of the Sherman tank in British service during 
the Normandy Campaign. This will appeal to anyone with 
an interest in armoured warfare and the period covered. 
Much Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Tank Craft, Sherman Tanks, British Army and Royal Marines, 
Normandy Campaign 1944
FILE: R2407
AUTHOR:  Dennis Oliver
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: soft back 
PAGES:  64
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 1I, World War Two, Second World War, tanks, 
AFV, Sherman Tanks, Normandy Campaign, 1944, British Army, Royal 
Marines, Special Weapons versions, ABRV, Firefly, models, model 
engineering, 1-72, 1-35, 1-48 scale
ISBN: 1-47388-530-2
IMAGE: B2407.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/hlqev3n
LINKS: Current Discount Offers http://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/sale 
DESCRIPTION: This addition to the very popular Pen & Sword Craft 
series is up to a very high established standard. The excellent 
illustrations and examples of completed kits will appeal strongly 
to modellers of all ages, but there is also very good concise text 
that provides a clear overview of the Sherman tank in British service 
during the Normandy Campaign. This will appeal to anyone with an 
interest in armoured warfare and the period covered. Much Recommended.
The British Army had experimented with tank design between the 
two World Wars and had developed tactics very similar to those 
developing in Germany, but peacetime funding had resulted in few 
tanks being purchased. When the BEF was sent to France in 1939, 
it took most of the trained soldiers, a large part of the reserves, 
and almost all of the heavy weapons. When the Dunkirk evacuation 
got underway, the vehicles and guns had to be left behind to make 
maximum space for the British and French soldiers and to enable 
small boats to collect soldiers from the open beaches, taking them 
out to larger vessels offshore. An emergency manufacturing program 
got under way to equip the survivors and all the new volunteers and 
conscripts. To keep high rates of production, the introduction of 
new tank designs took second place and the British Army had to fight 
on through 1940 and 1941 with a mixture of light tanks, tankettes, 
infantry tanks and a few limited cruiser models. Although tank design 
continued through WWII and led to manufacture and introduction of new 
all-British models, increasing dependence was placed on using American 
tanks.

The Grant and Lee models introduced American tanks that could fight on 
more equal terms with current German designs. More importantly, they 
were available in much larger numbers than the latest British tanks. 
That allowed for some high rates of battle damage and although the 
American tanks were solid designs, they were optimised for rapid 
construction and became easy targets for the best German tanks and 
anti-tank guns. As the Sherman entered service with the British in North 
Africa, it was still vulnerable to some German guns and the latest tanks, 
but it was a great improvement on the Lee and Grant designs, without 
making a great departure in terms of components and design philosophy. 
Crews generally liked the Sherman even though its petrol engine and fuel 
tanks were vulnerable to German guns and prone to 'brew up', the Germans 
called them 'Tommy Cookers', they were generally reliable and successful 
in the hands of a well-trained crew.

By 1944, the Sherman was outclassed by the German Tiger and Panther tanks. 
Efforts were made to narrow the gap and the British fitted 17 pounder 
guns to create the Firefly Sherman that demonstrated an ability to kill 
German Tiger tanks. The large number of Shermans shipping to Britain also 
made it very suitable for modification to create special models for the 
Normandy landings, propellers and floatation screens enabling some Shermans 
to swim ashore and deploy quickly. Other variants swept for mines, served 
as flamethrowers, acted as Beach Recovery Vehicles and as engineer demolition 
models.

The Sherman has naturally encouraged model kit manufacturers to produce some 
fine models, and for specialist component suppliers to offer alternative 
parts to produce competition and exhibition quality models.

This new book provides some fantastic photographs and full colour drawings 
that will help modellers produce the best possible models. Tanks enthusiasts 
will also find much of great interest in the text that provides a very good 
overview of Shermans in British service in Normandy and includes images that 
have not appeared before in any other publications.