Tank Craft 22,M48 Patton, American Cold War Battle Tank

The TankCraft series is aimed at the modelling enthusiasts but has become popular with a much wider readership. This new addition covers the M48 Patton series of tanks and follows the successful format of many full colour images of the subject and available model kits, combined with good text in captions, extended captions, introduction and tank history. – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Tank Craft 22,M48 Patton, American Cold War Battle Tank
FILE: R3123
AUTHOR: Rob Griffin
PUBLISHER: Tank Craft, Pen & Sword 
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £16.99                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Cold War, surrogate wars, Vietnam War, exports, technology, MBT, Main 
Battle Tank, armour, US Army, NATO, gun tank. 90Mm canon, 105mm canon, fire 
control.

ISBN: 1-52675-773-7

PAGES: 64
IMAGE: B3123.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/qmqr6w3
DESCRIPTION: The TankCraft series is aimed at the modelling enthusiasts but has 
become popular with a much wider readership. This new addition covers the M48 
Patton series of tanks and follows the successful format of many full colour 
images of the subject and available model kits, combined with good text in 
captions, extended captions, introduction and tank history. – Very Highly 
Recommended.

The US Army urgently needed a new tank to replace the M3, M4 and M10 tanks of 
WWII. During WWII, the US tank models were adequate weapons systems but far 
behind German and British technology. This made them vulnerable to German tanks 
and earned the name 'Tommy Cooker' because the Germans could engage them 
beyond the effective range of their less capable main armament, setting them ablaze. 
What made them the most numerous Allied battle tanks was that US factories could 
churn out new tanks faster than the Germans could destroy them, even allowing for 
those tanks lost at sea when their cargo ships were sunk by U-Boats. The British 
modified many of the M4 Shermans shipped from the US, using the basic vehicle to 
produce many specialist tanks, including swimming versions that were then supplied 
to US Army regiments for D-Day. The British also replaced the standard main gun 
with the very effective British Firefly 17 pounder that turned the tanks into Tiger 
killers. The Canadians also modified M10s supplied to them to protect crews from 
the effects of air-burst shells.

When the first Patton M48s appeared they were produced in smaller numbers than 
the Soviets produced for their armoured designs and the US M48 was also more 
costly. However, it was not more effective than the numerous cheap Russian tanks. 
Many of the M48s produced were equipped with a 90mm canon that was not capable 
of destroying Soviet heavy tanks like the IS. The  Russian 120mm canon could 
destroy the M48 beyond the effective range of its 90mm and unlike the Germans 
during WWII, the Soviets were out producing the US in numbers. The M48 series 
featured incremental improvements to the basic design with new engines and the 
superlative British 105mm canon built under license in the US.

For all of its limitations, the M48 was a significant advance on the M4 Sherman and 
enjoyed a long career and great export success. This book covers the variations of 
M48 well and the photography is excellent. The new growing readership of 
TankCraft volumes will find the introduction and history well researched and 
presented, with the images providing detailed views rarely provided in other 
publications. The modellers will find great ideas and examples, together with details 
of both available kits and after market products to produce exhibition grade models.