Supplying the British Army in the First World War

Wellington and Napoleon understood that armies marched on their stomachs, poor logistics could counter the bravest soldiers and commanders. The Great War was not only a global conflict, across theatres with very different conditions, but it challenged logistics organization because of its sheer size and complexity. – Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Supplying the British Army in the First World War
FILE: R2886
AUTHOR: Janet MacDonald
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 224
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War I, World War One, World War 1, First World War, 
The Great War, 1914-18 War, logistics, theatres, transport, storage, production, 
munitions, food, clothing, equipment, trains, lorries, horses, mules, boats, ferries

ISBN: 1-47385-683-7

IMAGE: B2886.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/yxzdcokz
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Wellington and Napoleon understood that armies marched on 
their stomachs, poor logistics could counter the bravest soldiers and commanders. 
The Great War was not only a global conflict, across theatres with very 
different conditions, but it challenged logistics organization because of its 
sheer size and complexity. –   Highly Recommended

The author has a special interest and expertise in military logistics, providing an 
excellent account of how the British Army was supplied through the challenges 
of the Great War.

The First World War presented a huge mountain to climb for those responsible for 
supplying the British Army, barracks, in training, and in battle, across the world. 
The major focus was on the Western Front which was able to chew up millions of 
men, destroy all of their assets and still leave a need to supply the replacements. A 
musket required ball and powder to sustain a rate of fire of three to four rounds per 
minute. A machine gun in 1914 used 500 rounds a minute, all of which had to be 
transported from factories, to depots, to trains, to ships, to trains, and trucks and 
still required manpower and horsepower to make it the final miles through the mud 
to the trenches. As light railways were built to speed the final miles to delivery, that 
was soon swallowed up by the insatiable machine guns and the bolt action rifles. 
Something often forgotten is that a well trained British rifle company could achieve 
a rate of fire that rivalled machine guns. Just one part of a very complex mix of 
requirements.

Food and clothing was equally essential and demanding. In other theatres, great 
mobility required supplies to be sent long distances to converge with where the 
Army was expected to be at some future point. The Middle East involved moving 
supplies across hostile terrain to reach an army that was mounted on horses, camels 
and motor vehicles moving around without the level of communications achieved 
in WWII.

A special factor for the British was that they were a composite force of many 
nationalities, languages and religions. This introduced the obvious challenge of 
labels that all could understand, but it also meant dietary considerations where 
one group could not eat the same food, or observed a different day of rest.

Although logistics have become so critical to modern warfare, remarkably little 
has been written about this vital service. It is a pleasure to read a well-research 
and comprehensive account of logistics in WWI in support of the British Army.