STUG III & IV, German Army, Waffen-SS and Luftwaffe, Western Front, 1944-1945

A welcome addition to a very popular series aimed at model makers and military vehicle enthusiasts. Circumstances forced the Germans to find creative ways of keeping obsolescent armoured vehicles current and the STUG III & IV are classics of this – Highly Recommended.

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

http://ftnews.firetrench.com

NAME: STUG III & IV, German Army, Waffen-SS and Luftwaffe, Western Front, 
1944-1945
FILE: R2964
AUTHOR: Dennis Oliver
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, TankCraft
BINDING: soft back
PRICE: £14.99
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War II, World War 2, Second World War, armour, tank 
killers, assault guns, obsolescent designs, German Army, Waffen-SS, Luftwaffe, 
SP anti-aircraft guns, Western Front, Closing Stages of WWII

ISBN: 1-52675-586-6

IMAGE: B2964.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y5onktg4
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: A welcome addition to a very popular series aimed at model makers 
and military vehicle enthusiasts. Circumstances forced the Germans to find 
creative ways of keeping obsolescent armoured vehicles current and the 
STUG III & IV are classics of this –    Highly Recommended.

The Pkw III and IV tanks were late into service with the Polish invasion and early 
WWII actions depending heavily on the training tanks Pkw 1 and Pkw II which were
inadequately armoured and armed. The small number of Pkw III tanks used in the 
Battle of France proved inferior to the British Matilda infantry tank which could 
shrug off fire from the Pkw III and hit it fatally with a much more effective anti-tank 
cannon. The Germans faced a fundamental problem that it could not build tanks fast 
enough and faced an even greater challenge in developing and adequately testing 
new designs. To fill the gap they came up with some creative methods of increasing 
firepower and armour, if with a number of limitations.

The basic problem facing tank designers around the world was that as soon as a 
new model entered service, the enemies or potential enemies were introducing 
more effective designs. The Soviet T-34 was an example of a new design that 
caught the Germans on the hop and made their existing tanks obsolete almost 
overnight. The Pkw III and Pkw IV models needed urgently to be up-gunned and 
up-armoured to meet the Soviet threat and also the new designs entering service 
with the Western Allies. However, the most reliable approach would have been to 
design a larger tank with much heavier and better sloped armour, topped with a 
larger, better armoured turret mounting a much more powerful gun with better fire 
control. The real answer was the Pkw V Panther and the Tiger I & II designs but 
producing them fast enough and fixing all the teething problems meant delays and 
reliability problems.

Fixing the gap was addressed by converting the Pkw III and Pkw IV designs into 
assault tanks, where an much heavier gun was mounted directly in the hull to 
overcome the limitations of trunnion spacing and turret ring limitations of a turreted 
design. To improve protection, additional armour was bolted on, spaced from the 
original armour. The resulting vehicle had the advantage of lower silhouette against 
the disadvantage of limited traverse and elevation/depression and a greater overall 
weight that limited performance.

This book provides outstanding illustration and a concise history of the models and 
their development. This is accompanied with the comprehensive review of available 
model kits and specialist parts to modify kits to produce exhibition standard models. 
It will be very well received by its primary targeted readership, but this is a great 
value book with impressive illustration that is affordable and informative for those 
developing an interest in military history.