Storm Over Europe, Allied Bombing Missions in The Second World War

A well-illustrated study of the air war over Europe, many images being in full colour. The author has provided a very readable study, with images of the aircraft that took part in the greatest air battle in history. – Very Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Storm Over Europe, Allied Bombing Missions in The Second World War
FILE: R3147
AUTHOR: Juan Vazquez Garcia
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £25.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  World War 2, World War Two, World War II, WWII, Second World War, 
air war, bombing missions, light bombers, medium bombers, heavy bombers, night 
bombing, day bombing, fighter escorts, night fighters, rocket fighters, jet fighters, 
anti aircraft artillery, rockets, bombs, defensive armament

ISBN: 1-52674-098-2
PAGES: 154
IMAGE: B3147.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/wzxpoqh
DESCRIPTION: A well-illustrated study of the air war over Europe, many images 
being in full colour. The author has provided a very readable study, with images 
of the aircraft that took part in the greatest air battle in history. – Very Highly 
Recommended.

When war was declared in 1939, the RAF was in the process of re-equipping, with 
Fighter Command receiving the priority for manufacture and delivery. The US was 
not expected to enter the war anytime soon, the Germans were equipped with aircraft 
and tactics proven in the Spanish Civil War, and the rest of Europe had been equipped 
with obsolescent and obsolete war planes. The author has nicely captured the 
unfolding developments in bomber aircraft and night fighters, with the introduction 
of jet and rocket power and missiles.

At the start of war, the RAF was surprisingly ill-equipped with bomber aircraft in 
view of strategic bombing being one of the original justifications for establishing a 
air force independent from the Army and the Royal Navy. The Whitley was an 
attempt at introducing a monoplane twin engine bomber with heavy defensive 
armament, a good bomb load capacity and range to target, capable of deployment in 
the strategic bombing role. It was never the less an interim machine that was soon 
relegated to secondary duties of maritime patrol and glider towing. The Wellington 
was a much more serious design that was the backbone of strategic bombing until the 
four engine heavy bomber arrived with squadrons, continuing then as a medium 
bomber and in deployments to maritime strike and patrol.

The other bombers in the RAF inventory were similar in many ways to the German 
bombers. The crew were seated close together with light defensive armament, 
modest bomb load, disappointing performance and inadequate range for the strategic 
role. They were essentially close support machines to cooperate with the army but 
with added capacity that made them suitable as light or medium bombers in a wider 
role, including leaflet dropping.

By the end of WWII, Allied bombing fleets were able to pound targets anywhere in 
Germany and Occupied Europe around the clock and with increasingly powerful 
bombs, the RAF having 5 and 10 ton 'earthquake' bombs in their selection of bomb 
loads, the superlative Lancaster being able to carry the 10 ton earthquake bomb, or a 
similar weight in mixed weight and purpose bombs. The German fighter defence had 
developed in an attempt to stop the Allied bomber fleets and Allied bombers were 
accompanied all the way to and from most targets by effective escort fighters, 
including radar equipped Mosquitoes that accompanied the RAF night raids into 
Germany, took out German night fighters, and attacked their airfields and radar 
systems. This amazing chain of development is neatly illustrated by the author.