Stopping Hitler, an Official Account of How Britain Planned to Defend Itself in the Second World War

Captain Wynne of the Historical Section of the Cabinet Office produced this unique account of British threat responses to potential German conflict. The response was in four sections to different threats and used some documents that were later destroyed or filed under security restrictions – Strongly Recommended.


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NAME: Stopping Hitler, an Official Account of How Britain Planned to 
Defend Itself in the Second World War
FILE: R2493
AUTHOR: Captain G C Wynne
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Frontline
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  388
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Second World War, WWII, World War Two, World War 2, 
Dunkirk, Sea lion, defence, coast defence, underground army, 
intelligence, street fighting, armour, artillery

ISBN: 1-47389-552-9

IMAGE: B2493.jpg6
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/m88qbf5
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: Captain Wynne of the Historical Section of the Cabinet 
Office produced this unique account of British threat responses to 
potential German conflict. The response was in four sections to 
different threats and used some documents that were later destroyed 
or filed under security restrictions - Strongly Recommended.

This account of British plans is probably the only full account until 
historians later access some documents that have been sealed. Even 
then, their accounts will be unable to include documents destroyed. 
Captain Wynne had full access to all documentation for his research. 
The final security review of his work may have required the deletion 
of some information, and required various modifications, but there is 
no way of knowing now what may have been stripped out for security 
reasons. When the work was completed in 1948, British policies were 
again changing. The incoming Labour Government unwisely started by 
assuming their real ally would be the Soviet Union and they 
disgracefully shipped military technology to Stalin as gifts. By 1948, 
even the dyed in the wool communist members of the Atlee 
Administration were being forced to accept that this view of the 
Soviet Union was seriously flawed and, slowly, the Government was 
being forced to make a series of changes to respond to this new and 
growing threat. The consequences of this to history are that Churchill 
had deliberately ordered the destruction of some technology and 
documentation to prevent the Labour Party sharing it with Russia. The 
Labour Government then realized his worst fears by making many unwise 
gifts to the Soviets. As even Labour came to understand their 
stupidity, some documentation that was highly sensitive, and some 
technologies and strategies, were reclassified to restrict access to 
these secrets.

Capt Wynne came into the situation as it was moving towards the new 
Cold War footing. As a result, some documents may have already been 
destroyed, but he did have access to all classified, sensitive and 
unclassified documentation relating to the preparations for WWII and 
the modifications introduced to meet changing circumstances.

Although the period following WWI was dominated by a political and 
public belief that the Great War had been the war to end all war, and 
that any further conflict could never be, there were people who 
doubted this fervent wish. Even before the Nazis came to power, there 
were some voices of caution, mostly from an understanding of how 
unwise the final Peace Treaty had been in providing German resentment. 
In the military, there were officers who had the job of preparing for 
all sorts of contingencies, however unlikely they might seem to most 
people. When Hitler came to power, the military began to increase 
preparations for a new war with Germany, even though very few 
politicians were prepared to consider this possibility. In fact 
Churchill was almost a lone voice warning of the dangers.

By the mid 1930s, Britain was starting to spend an increasing sum on 
updating the seriously neglected Armed Forces. Crash programs began to 
attempt to design and build modern aircraft, ships and tanks. However, 
that was just the visible part of the activity. The military had to 
decide what the threat priorities were, decide what equipment and 
manpower was required and prepare the way for manufacture of weapons. 
As these weapons were coming into service, the military had to develop 
new tactics and strategies to use systems that were a major change 
from what they had been equipped with.

There were four different threats envisaged and these were reviewed 
with developing plans to counter them. As no threat stands still, 
the plans had to be modified to reflect the current realities. The 
author has produced a unique and detailed account of the preparations 
and the modest photo-plate section includes some very interesting 
images.