Stalag Luft III, An Official History of the ‘Great Escape’ PoW Camp

The film ‘The Great Escape’ was great entertainment, but with re-written history. This overdue account is a warts and all commentary of the events at and related to German PoW camp Stalag Luft III. Every bit as entertaining as the film, but its also a stirring and poinient account of downed airmen not prepared to give up. Strongly Recommended.


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NAME: Stalag Luft III, An Official History of the 'Great Escape' 
PoW Camp
FILE: R2471
AUTHOR: Howard Tuck
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, frontline
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES:  276
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWII, World War 2, World War II, Second World War, PoW, 
downed airmen, Great Escape, tunnels, escape kits, money, maps, fake 
ID cards, 'Trojan Horse', 'Tom', 'Dick', 'Harry', home run, massacre, 
Germans

ISBN: 1-47388-305-9

IMAGE: B2471.jpg
BUYNOW: http://tinyurl.com/moyqhrq
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION: The film 'The Great Escape' was great entertainment, but 
with re-written history. This overdue account is a warts and all 
commentary of the events at and related to German PoW camp Stalag Luft 
III.  Every bit as entertaining as the film, but its also a stirring 
and poinient account of downed airmen not prepared to give up. 
Strongly Recommended. 

Across Germany and German held territory, PoW camps sprouted up to hold 
captured Allied prisoners of war. Although a camp might be largely 
filled with prisoners of one nationality, there were also captives of 
other nationalities. There was generally good co-operation between 
Allied prisoners and a common desire to attempt to escape. Where the 
Germans had hoped to guard their PoW camps with a few old soldiers, or 
airmen, accompanied by comrades who had poor health or battle wounds, 
the determined attempts by Allied POWs forced them to allocate more 
and more able front-line troops to guard duty. Every time an escape 
was attempted, it tied up thousands of police and troops across 
Germany to foil the escapes and re-capture the POWs. Documentation 
reveals that Nazi officials had made several attempts to win approval 
for actions against International Treaties to reduce the cost of 
keeping POWs, but fear of retaliatory action by the Allies, against 
German POWs held by them, restrained the Nazis. Stalag Luft III was 
to produce such a large escape attempt that the SS were allowed to 
take most of the re-captured escapees and shoot them.

The war crime of murdering re-captured 'Great Escape' POWs has often 
overshadowed the actions that led up to the escape and to the 
experiences of the escapees. Equally, books and films about the 'Great 
Escape' have not given even coverage to the story. This official 
history does achieve balance and is based on information and 
testimonies from those who were there. The result is a factual account 
of the development of the camp and the activities of the POWs leading 
up to the escape. It also provides a view of the way in which the 
Germans ran the camp and punished escapees who were re-captured.

As with any good 'official' history it provides information that is 
unlikely to be bettered or even equalled, correcting previous flawed 
accounts and entertainments based on the story.