Spitfire, The Full Story Of A Unique Battle Of Britain Fighter Squadron

Researched from the 1980s, this is the most thorough book about any squadron in RAF service during the Battle of Britain. This research captured the thoughts and experiences of the pilots who are now all dead. It is an impeccable source of information and a gripping story – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Spitfire, The Full Story Of A Unique Battle Of Britain Fighter Squadron
FILE: R2967
AUTHOR: Dilip Sarkar MBE
PUBLISHER: Pen and Sword, Air World
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £30.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: Bi-planes, Mono-planes, Spitfire, 19 Squadron, Duxford, Duxford Wing, 
Battle of Britain, pilots, tactics, operational flying, WWII, World War II, World War 2, 
Second World War

ISBN: 1-52673-281-5

IMAGE: B2967.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y33f5hc2
LINKS: 
DESCRIPTION: Researched from the 1980s, this is the most thorough book about 
any squadron in RAF service during the Battle of Britain. This research captured 
the thoughts and experiences of the pilots who are now all dead. It is an 
impeccable source of information and a gripping story –    Most Highly 
Recommended.

The author began researching in the 1980s, inspired by the story of Squadron Leader 
Brian Lane DFC. His earlier Spitfire Squadron: 19 Squadron at War 1939-41 has 
been the foundation from which this completely new and lavishly illustrated book 
has emerged.

19 Squadron was mounted on one of the common biplane fighters before WWII,  
the Gloster Gauntlet II. This fighter was typical of the period, sharing the technology 
of WWI biplane fighters and achieving the most modest increases in performance. 
When 19 Squadron was selected to take the amazing new Spitfire into operational 
service it was a huge leap for the pilots. The first machines were fitted with the 
traditional wooden fixed pitch propeller but everything else was very different. The 
monocoque construction was a world away from the wood and steel tube frame of 
the biplanes. The cockpit was enclosed, the undercarriage retracted, the pilot was in 
radio communication with the most advance command and control system ever built 
by anyone, sleek contours of the forward fuselage, that housed the Merlin engine,
and the beautiful elliptical wing form was as far removed from tradition as could be. 
Everywhere there were rare or unique features, including the very effective and 
revolutionary reflector gun sight.

The author has told the story of the revolution from Gauntlet to Spitfire and captured 
the impressions of the pilots who faced the challenge and great opportunity of 
revolution. The words of these pilots and the extensive collection of images combine 
to produce what must be the definitive book in its topic field. This is a book that no 
professional, enthusiast or military historian should miss and it should and will 
appeal to an even wider audience