Sovereign of the Seas 1637, A Reconstruction of the Most Powerful Warship of its Day

A sumptuous production of a book to underline the extraordinary vessel that is its subject. The publisher is renowned for releasing very high quality books on naval history and this is an excellent example with stunning and lavish illustration. – Most Highly Recommended.

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NAME: Sovereign of the Seas 1637, A Reconstruction of the Most Powerful 
Warship of its Day
FILE: R3158
AUTHOR: John McKay
PUBLISHER: Seaforth Publishing, Pen & Sword
BINDING: hard back
PRICE: £40.00                                                               
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT:  Line of battle ship, gun platform, technology, Royal Navy, rigging, 
construction, power, heavy guns, 100+ gun ship, 17th Century, naval warfare, naval 
architecture

ISBN: 978-1-5267-6629-8

PAGES: 296
IMAGE: B3158.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y95q2hpc
DESCRIPTION: A sumptuous production of a book to underline the extraordinary 
vessel that is its subject. The publisher is renowned for releasing very high 
quality books on naval history and this is an excellent example with stunning 
and lavish illustration. – Most Highly Recommended.

The Sovereign of the Seas was an incredibly powerful warship that was something of 
a vanity project for the King who was personally involved in her specification and 
massive firepower. The ship was not only a powerful warship but also a highly 
decorated work of art. The Dutch called her the 'Golden Devil' and she dwarfed the 
ships of the Admiralties of the United Provinces. Many readers may come to the 
history of this ship with a perspective set in the days of Nelson. For many, HMS 
Victory is seen as the most powerful vessel at the peak of ship design. It is interesting 
to compare her to the Sovereign of the Seas

The Sovereign of the Seas not only achieved more than 100 guns, but they included 
heavier long guns than the largest battleships in the navy of Nelson. The guns were 
equal in accuracy and could be used at longer range. Where the ships of Nelson's day 
carried long guns in the main battery of 32 pounders, the Sovereign carried 42 
pounders. The secondary armament was of 18 pounders and 9 pounders. In weight of 
shell, the Royal Navy a hundred fifty years on did carry 64 pounder guns but these 
were the Carronades, or Smashers, mounted on slides and with a short barrel. They 
were intended for close action, where the Sovereign could stand off a target and 
pound it with its 42 pounder long guns on four wheel trucks.

The author has reconstructed the Sovereign of the Seas. No contemporary plans have 
survived and visual evidence is contradictory. He has therefore analysed the available 
data and reconstructed the design and appearance in incredible detail. The result is a 
book that will satisfy all naval history enthusiasts and provide all of the detail to 
assist a skilled modeller in producing a spectacular exhibition quality model. Very 
few books of warships contain the level of detail provided here in logical sections 
that cover every aspect of design and construction.