Southern Thunder, The Royal Navy and the Scandinavian Trade in World War One

The Baltic Trade was vital to the British Isles for hundreds of years, dating back to before the Medieval period. The First World War saw Britain and Germany competing for trade with Scandinavia, providing vital supplies to Britain and requiring the defeat of German trade to enforce a tight blockade of Germany. – Very Highly Recommended

http://reviews.firetrench.com

http://adn.firetrench.com

http://bgn.firetrench.com

http://nthn.firetrench.com

NAME: Southern Thunder, The Royal Navy and the Scandinavian Trade in World 
War One
FILE: R2824
AUTHOR: Steve R Dunn
PUBLISHER: Pen & Sword, Seaforth
BINDING: hard back 
PAGES: 304
PRICE: £25.00
GENRE: Non Fiction
SUBJECT: WWI, World War One, World War I, World War 1, First World War, 
The Great War, naval warfare, tactics, technology, politics, Baltic Trade, 
Scandinavian Trade, convoys

ISBN: 978-105267-2663-6

IMAGE: B2824.jpg
BUYNOW: tinyurl.com/y2s5rzc5
LINKS:  
DESCRIPTION:   The Baltic Trade was vital to the British Isles for hundreds 
of years, dating back to before the Medieval period. The First World War saw 
Britain and Germany competing for trade with Scandinavia, providing vital 
supplies to Britain and requiring the defeat of German trade to enforce a tight 
blockade of Germany. - Very Highly Recommended

The Scandinavian Countries were neutrals but had a strong vested interest in 
supplying both sides in the conflict, not only maintaining the pre-war levels of 
trade, but also now at premium prices. Germany needed food and raw materials as 
the British blockade cut access to most overseas trading partners and greatly 
restricted supplies from those remaining. For Britain, cutting German trade had the 
dual benefit of providing essential supplies to Britain from traditional trading 
sources, and denying those supplies to Germany.

The situation was much as it had been  during the Napoleonic Wars, where the 
British had to use naval power to cut supplies to mainland Europe and protect its 
own merchant ships. In WWI, this involved the aggressive use of ships and 
submarines of the Royal Navy in the North Sea and in the Baltic, and the 
introduction of escorted convoys of merchant ships.

The author has brought new light to a vital part of the story of WWI and one 
which has been strangely neglected by historians. There is good analysis, careful 
research, assembly of first hand accounts, and good illustrious in a black and 
white photo-plate section, including images of airship and aircraft convoy escorts 
from the RNAS.